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Page of Ulysses Annotatedsort descending Quote Text Name Post date Link
34 sinned against the light Some modern-day Christians blamed modern-day Jews for the execution of Jesus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake. Depicted herein is the clash between visions of a theory, or philosophy, of progressive history and a Modernist conception of a more chaotic theory of history. See, for example, the ninth thesis of Walter Benjamin's "Theses on the Philosophy of History," which may be found here: http://pages.ucsd.edu/~rfrank/class_web/ES-200A/Week%202/benjamin_ps.pdf Here, at the critical crystallization of Stephen's thoughts on the matter, it's worth recalling that it was Haines' casual comment that "it seems history is to blame" has triggered most of Stephen's thinking in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 10:47 view
34 Who has not? i.e. Who has not sinned in some way? Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:14 view
34 A woman too brought Parnell low This refers to Irish-nationalist Charles Stewart Parnell's affair with Katherine O'Shea, wife of Captain William O'Shea, an Irish soldier and Member of Parliament. Captain O'Shea had not divorced his wife because she was expecting a large inheritance. When Captain O'Shea finally filed for divorce in 1889, the ensuing trial revealed the affair and the fact that Parnell had fathered three of Katherine's children. The divorce scandal severely damaged Parnell's reputation and caused the Catholic church to condemn his immorality. Heather Munro P... 2016-06-06 10:01 view
34 sinned against the light Some modern-day Christians blamed modern-day Jews for the execution of Jesus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 A shout in the street Rather than an almighty judge, Stephen suggests 'God' might be just one more random set of opinions Tim Finnegan 2015-03-26 04:33 view
34 merchant Stephen gently suggests that the hatred of unscrupulous merchants should be directed against the merchants themselves, not against a race Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 sinned against the light Some modern-day Christians blamed modern-day Jews for the execution of Jesus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 merchant Stephen gently suggests that the hatred of unscrupulous merchants should be directed against the merchants themselves, not against a race Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 Who has not? i.e. Who has not sinned in some way? Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:14 view
34 merchant Stephen gently suggests that the hatred of unscrupulous merchants should be directed against the merchants themselves, not against a race Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:15 view
34 History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake. Depicted herein is the clash between visions of a theory, or philosophy, of progressive history and a Modernist conception of a more chaotic theory of history. See, for example, the ninth thesis of Walter Benjamin's "Theses on the Philosophy of History," which may be found here: http://pages.ucsd.edu/~rfrank/class_web/ES-200A/Week%202/benjamin_ps.pdf Here, at the critical crystallization of Stephen's thoughts on the matter, it's worth recalling that it was Haines' casual comment that "it seems history is to blame" has triggered most of Stephen's thinking in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 10:47 view
34 Who has not? i.e. Who has not sinned in some way? Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:14 view
28 algebra Echo of Mulligan's early explanation of Stephen's Hamlet paradox Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Amor matris ''amor matris'' is Latin for ''a mother's love'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 Give hands directions for the dancing of a morris Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Yet someone had loved him Stephen muses on the wonder of the love of mothers for their children, even children as weak and ill-favored as Sargent, as ''the only true thing in life''; he obviously has an uneasiness over his relationship to his deceased mother, whose last wish he slighted in order to feel free. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:10 view
28 subjective and objective genitive. The ambiguous grammar can mean either a mother's love for a child, or a child's love for the mother Tim Finnegan 2015-03-26 04:38 view
28 mien appearance/countenance /complexion Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 The only true thing in life? Stephen remembering Cranly's words and argument from Portrait. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:41 view
28 morrice Like ''morris'', a medieval, slow country dance remotely like American square dancing Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Amor matris ''amor matris'' is Latin for ''a mother's love'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 Give hands directions for the dancing of a morris Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Yet someone had loved him Stephen muses on the wonder of the love of mothers for their children, even children as weak and ill-favored as Sargent, as ''the only true thing in life''; he obviously has an uneasiness over his relationship to his deceased mother, whose last wish he slighted in order to feel free. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:10 view
28 mien appearance/countenance /complexion Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 The only true thing in life? Stephen remembering Cranly's words and argument from Portrait. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:41 view
28 morrice Like ''morris'', a medieval, slow country dance remotely like American square dancing Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 subjective and objective genitive subjective and objective genitive are the declensions of the Latin nouns (declensions are to nouns sort of what conjugations are to verbs; the declension of a noun indicates how it is being used in a sentence) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:06 view
28 Moors Algebra is an Arabic (archaic "Moorish") invention Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:08 view
28 algebra Echo of Mulligan's early explanation of Stephen's Hamlet paradox Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 mien appearance/countenance /complexion Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 morrice Like ''morris'', a medieval, slow country dance remotely like American square dancing Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 subjective and objective genitive subjective and objective genitive are the declensions of the Latin nouns (declensions are to nouns sort of what conjugations are to verbs; the declension of a noun indicates how it is being used in a sentence) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:06 view
28 Moors Algebra is an Arabic (archaic "Moorish") invention Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:08 view
28 algebra Echo of Mulligan's early explanation of Stephen's Hamlet paradox Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Amor matris ''amor matris'' is Latin for ''a mother's love'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:07 view
28 Give hands directions for the dancing of a morris Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:09 view
28 Yet someone had loved him Stephen muses on the wonder of the love of mothers for their children, even children as weak and ill-favored as Sargent, as ''the only true thing in life''; he obviously has an uneasiness over his relationship to his deceased mother, whose last wish he slighted in order to feel free. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:10 view
28 subjective and objective genitive subjective and objective genitive are the declensions of the Latin nouns (declensions are to nouns sort of what conjugations are to verbs; the declension of a noun indicates how it is being used in a sentence) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:06 view
28 Moors Algebra is an Arabic (archaic "Moorish") invention Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:08 view
35 Irish Homestead George Russell (AE) is associated with (editor of, 1905-23) The Irish Homestead. When Stephen goes to the National Library (Scylla and Charybdis), it is to deliver this letter of Deasy's to AE. bbogle 2015-05-28 12:21 view
35 couchant heraldic term for lying down (like a lion on a knight's shield) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:12 view
35 Irish Homestead George Russell (AE) is associated with (editor of, 1905-23) The Irish Homestead. When Stephen goes to the National Library (Scylla and Charybdis), it is to deliver this letter of Deasy's to AE. bbogle 2015-05-28 12:21 view
35 couchant heraldic term for lying down (like a lion on a knight's shield) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:12 view
35 Telegraph. Irish Homestead two Dublin papers with which Stephen has connections Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:13 view
35 couchant heraldic term for lying down (like a lion on a knight's shield) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:12 view
35 Telegraph. Irish Homestead two Dublin papers with which Stephen has connections Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:13 view
35 Telegraph. Irish Homestead two Dublin papers with which Stephen has connections Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:13 view
29 illdyed Illdyed ≈ Iliad? bbogle 2015-03-26 13:07 view
29 Stuart coins Stuart refers to the family that ruled England during the 1600s. Despite the Stuart's Catholicism and Irish ancestry, the family brought grief to Ireland by the backlash against their Catholicism following their rule. The treasure of their wealth is ''base'', as it has been taken from the Irish people Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 It is very simple Stephen struggled with sums when he was Sargent's age, as shown in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:00 view
29 gaitered wearing gaiters, an accessory that protected the ankles, and sometimes the shins, from mud Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 illdyed Illdyed ≈ Iliad? bbogle 2015-03-26 13:07 view
29 Stuart coins Stuart refers to the family that ruled England during the 1600s. Despite the Stuart's Catholicism and Irish ancestry, the family brought grief to Ireland by the backlash against their Catholicism following their rule. The treasure of their wealth is ''base'', as it has been taken from the Irish people Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 gaitered wearing gaiters, an accessory that protected the ankles, and sometimes the shins, from mud Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 gaitered wearing gaiters, an accessory that protected the ankles, and sometimes the shins, from mud Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 Mr Deasy A venerated geezer at the time of the Trojan War and a legendary horseman from days of yore, Nestor (Deasy) was a sort of Polonious-type, better known for dispensing outmoded advice than for achievements won in the execution thereof. Too old to fight at Troy himself, this master of war never failed to urge young men to do so. In seeking Odysseus, Telemachus (Stephen) first visited Nestor, where he heard a wealth of opinion and learned little information of use. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:22 view
29 Mr Deasy A venerated geezer at the time of the Trojan War and a legendary horseman from days of yore, Nestor (Deasy) was a sort of Polonious-type, better known for dispensing outmoded advice than for achievements won in the execution thereof. Too old to fight at Troy himself, this master of war never failed to urge young men to do so. In seeking Odysseus, Telemachus (Stephen) first visited Nestor, where he heard a wealth of opinion and learned little information of use. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:22 view
29 Stuart coins Stuart refers to the family that ruled England during the 1600s. Despite the Stuart's Catholicism and Irish ancestry, the family brought grief to Ireland by the backlash against their Catholicism following their rule. The treasure of their wealth is ''base'', as it has been taken from the Irish people Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
29 It is very simple Stephen struggled with sums when he was Sargent's age, as shown in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:00 view
27 fox burying his grandmother under a hollybush The fox imagery references Stephen, who is cunning like a fox and has also recently buried his mother (not quite grandmother, as in the riddle). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:12 view
27 Hockey Field (not ice) hockey Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:13 view
27 Futility Stephen recognizes the futility of the weak student's attempt to learn. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:11 view
27 Hockey Field (not ice) hockey Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:13 view
27 Sargent Gifford finds no source for the name Sargent. Perhaps it continues the military theme (i.e., "sergeant") begun in the history of Pyrrhus and echoing on in the battle-cries erupting from the hockey field as this episode plays out. bbogle 2015-03-26 12:11 view
27 Futility Stephen recognizes the futility of the weak student's attempt to learn. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:11 view
27 fox burying his grandmother under a hollybush The fox imagery references Stephen, who is cunning like a fox and has also recently buried his mother (not quite grandmother, as in the riddle). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:12 view
27 Sargent Gifford finds no source for the name Sargent. Perhaps it continues the military theme (i.e., "sergeant") begun in the history of Pyrrhus and echoing on in the battle-cries erupting from the hockey field as this episode plays out. bbogle 2015-03-26 12:11 view
27 Futility Stephen recognizes the futility of the weak student's attempt to learn. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:11 view
27 riddle The mystification of the pupils at Stephen's riddle reminds one of the riddle that Athy did not quite share with young Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, thereby bewildering that other once-upon-a-time young pupil. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:01 view
27 fox burying his grandmother under a hollybush The fox imagery references Stephen, who is cunning like a fox and has also recently buried his mother (not quite grandmother, as in the riddle). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:12 view
27 Hockey Field (not ice) hockey Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:13 view
27 Wh no indent Tim Finnegan 2015-11-22 02:04 view
27 riddle The mystification of the pupils at Stephen's riddle reminds one of the riddle that Athy did not quite share with young Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, thereby bewildering that other once-upon-a-time young pupil. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:01 view
33 The harlot's cry from street to streetShall weave old England's winding sheet. from William Blake's ''Auguries of Innocence'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:16 view
33 Rinderpest another type of cattle plague Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 pluterperfect Deasy combines two terms related to past tenses, ''pluperfect'' and ''preterperfect'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
33 England Note how Deasy considers Ireland just a part of England. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Cassandra A princess of Troy before its downfall. Apollo loved her and made her a seer; when his love was not returned, he cursed her so that her predictions would be accurate but always unheeded (for example, her prediction of Troy's sacking). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:19 view
33 The harlot's cry from street to streetShall weave old England's winding sheet. from William Blake's ''Auguries of Innocence'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:16 view
33 Rinderpest another type of cattle plague Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 pluterperfect Deasy combines two terms related to past tenses, ''pluperfect'' and ''preterperfect'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
33 England Note how Deasy considers Ireland just a part of England. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Cassandra A princess of Troy before its downfall. Apollo loved her and made her a seer; when his love was not returned, he cursed her so that her predictions would be accurate but always unheeded (for example, her prediction of Troy's sacking). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:19 view
33 embargo a ban on shipping or commerce Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 May I Stephen's interior monologue contains phrases from the letter he is skimming Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
33 England Note how Deasy considers Ireland just a part of England. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Cassandra A princess of Troy before its downfall. Apollo loved her and made her a seer; when his love was not returned, he cursed her so that her predictions would be accurate but always unheeded (for example, her prediction of Troy's sacking). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:19 view
33 embargo a ban on shipping or commerce Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 Koch's preparation This refers to the work of German physician and bacteriologist Heinrich Hermann Robert Koch (1843-1910), who performed groundbreaking work on the causes of anthrax, tuberculosis, cholera, and other bacterial diseases. Mr. Deasy is trying to show he is up to date on scientific discoveries. Unfortunately, in this case his interpretation of Koch's discoveries is wrong: foot and mouth disease cannot be cured. For more, see http://cas.umt.edu/english/joyce/notes/020055serumandvirus.htm Heather Munro P... 2015-06-16 16:35 view
33 May I Stephen's interior monologue contains phrases from the letter he is skimming Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
33 The harlot's cry from street to streetShall weave old England's winding sheet. from William Blake's ''Auguries of Innocence'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:16 view
33 Rinderpest another type of cattle plague Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 pluterperfect Deasy combines two terms related to past tenses, ''pluperfect'' and ''preterperfect'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
33 embargo a ban on shipping or commerce Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:17 view
33 May I Stephen's interior monologue contains phrases from the letter he is skimming Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:18 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. Going completely subjective: simply a lovely sentence. Notice how the episode ends, regardless, with one last grace note ringing a major motif of this episode: coins. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:49 view
36 phlegm Pattern of excretions: phlegm. wvarga7a1 2015-11-02 06:42 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. Going completely subjective: simply a lovely sentence. Notice how the episode ends, regardless, with one last grace note ringing a major motif of this episode: coins. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:49 view
36 path It seems significant that in the first three chapters Stephen never walks on a named road, while Bloom never does anything else Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:28 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. [spoiler] Foreshadows a later anecdote of Deasy's disagreeable wife throwing soup at a waiter Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:14 view
26 Weep no more Lines from a Milton poem Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 his shadow the shadow of Jesus, who is ''him who walked the waves'' (walked on water) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 an actuality of the possible as possible Stephen reflecting on the unfolding of history, of individual actualities precipitating out of a sea of potentialities in an indeterminate universe; or is the universe determinant, so that everything that happens unfolds as if by clockwork? bbogle 2015-05-28 11:36 view
26 studious silence Stephen remembers his recent studies in Paris; he was called home from these by the nearing death of his mother Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 Turn over Stephen knows the boy is sneaking glances at the text he was supposed to have memorized, and allows him to turn the page when he needs to; the boy pretends to not know what Stephen is talking about Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 Weep no more Lines from a Milton poem Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 To Caesar what is Caesar's "Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:21), Jesus's recommended method for dealing with secular and divine authorities Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 an actuality of the possible as possible Stephen reflecting on the unfolding of history, of individual actualities precipitating out of a sea of potentialities in an indeterminate universe; or is the universe determinant, so that everything that happens unfolds as if by clockwork? bbogle 2015-05-28 11:36 view
26 candescent glowing (incandescent) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 Turn over Stephen knows the boy is sneaking glances at the text he was supposed to have memorized, and allows him to turn the page when he needs to; the boy pretends to not know what Stephen is talking about Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 Weep no more Lines from a Milton poem Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 To Caesar what is Caesar's "Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:21), Jesus's recommended method for dealing with secular and divine authorities Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 candescent glowing (incandescent) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 his shadow the shadow of Jesus, who is ''him who walked the waves'' (walked on water) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 Hocke Field hockey which the boys play. That is, ritualized and stylized violence (sport): imparting through play the tradition of martial violence. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:39 view
26 studious silence Stephen remembers his recent studies in Paris; he was called home from these by the nearing death of his mother Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 To Caesar what is Caesar's "Render unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's, and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:21), Jesus's recommended method for dealing with secular and divine authorities Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 candescent glowing (incandescent) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 his shadow the shadow of Jesus, who is ''him who walked the waves'' (walked on water) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:14 view
26 Hocke Field hockey which the boys play. That is, ritualized and stylized violence (sport): imparting through play the tradition of martial violence. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:39 view
26 studious silence Stephen remembers his recent studies in Paris; he was called home from these by the nearing death of his mother Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
26 Turn over Stephen knows the boy is sneaking glances at the text he was supposed to have memorized, and allows him to turn the page when he needs to; the boy pretends to not know what Stephen is talking about Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:15 view
32 the dictates of common sense Deasy reads portions of the letter he is typing aloud, which is full of trite but high-sounding phrases Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 Where Cranly led me The race courses; Cranly is a friend from Stephen's younger days (and a character in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:25 view
32 foot and mouth disease Gilbert (pp 112-3) purports that Deasy's interest in cattle relates to the association between the home of Nestor near the River Alpheus, commonly associated with oxen. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:51 view
32 princely presence refers to the portrait of Albert Edward, not Mr. Deasy Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 Where Cranly led me The race courses; Cranly is a friend from Stephen's younger days (and a character in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:25 view
32 foot and mouth disease Gilbert (pp 112-3) purports that Deasy's interest in cattle relates to the association between the home of Nestor near the River Alpheus, commonly associated with oxen. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:51 view
32 princely presence refers to the portrait of Albert Edward, not Mr. Deasy Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:21 view
32 the dictates of common sense Deasy reads portions of the letter he is typing aloud, which is full of trite but high-sounding phrases Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 princely presence refers to the portrait of Albert Edward, not Mr. Deasy Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:21 view
32 the dictates of common sense Deasy reads portions of the letter he is typing aloud, which is full of trite but high-sounding phrases Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:26 view
32 Where Cranly led me The race courses; Cranly is a friend from Stephen's younger days (and a character in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:25 view
32 foot and mouth disease a plague affecting cattle and other animals Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:21 view
25 pier a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 a disappointed bridge disappointed in that doesn't cross any water Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 here do you begin Stephen ignores the students' request and moves on to their recitation lesson, asking for the line the students were supposed to begin from Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 They knew The boys, despite their relative youth, have all had or know about sexual encounters. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 ghoststory A ghost story is much on Stephen's mind: the recurring vision of his dead mother, and of her death. The riddle he tells the class might be construed as an age-appropriate version of this ghost story. bbogle 2015-05-28 09:14 view
25 Had Pyrrhus not fallen Stephen wonders what would have happened if significant moments history had ended differently. Had Pyrrhus not fallen, Greece might have remained a free country. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 pier a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 No-one here to hear Stephen considers that since no one who heard his joke was able to appreciate it, he should save it for a witticism during tonight's drinking with Mulligan and Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 swarthy having dark, olive-toned skin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily Girls the boys know Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 beldam old woman, crone Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 mirthless but with meaning Though they might not enjoy the joke, the boys do enjoy being able to laugh condescendingly at their teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 What then Repeating his witticism for Haines and Mulligan would only make Stephen into a jester or servant, offering up his mind in return for a little laughter. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 a disappointed bridge disappointed in that doesn't cross any water Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 here do you begin Stephen ignores the students' request and moves on to their recitation lesson, asking for the line the students were supposed to begin from Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 They knew The boys, despite their relative youth, have all had or know about sexual encounters. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 Had Pyrrhus not fallen Stephen wonders what would have happened if significant moments history had ended differently. Had Pyrrhus not fallen, Greece might have remained a free country. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 pier a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 No-one here to hear Stephen considers that since no one who heard his joke was able to appreciate it, he should save it for a witticism during tonight's drinking with Mulligan and Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 breastwork fortification Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily Girls the boys know Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 infinite possibilities all the other events in history that didn't occur because another event did; Stephen wonders if it's even worth thinking of these alternate realities as existing, since they never came to pass Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 mirthless but with meaning Though they might not enjoy the joke, the boys do enjoy being able to laugh condescendingly at their teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 chosen all that part Stephen feels that all the Irish have taken on the role of jesters or servants to others, perhaps because their land had been so long run under by foreign people. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 For Haines's chapbook Stephen remarks that his joke on Kingstown Pier would probably please Haines enough to record, as with his earlier words on the cracked mirror as ''the symbol of Irish art''. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 here do you begin Stephen ignores the students' request and moves on to their recitation lesson, asking for the line the students were supposed to begin from Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily. Gerty possibly refers to the Gerty who is the focus of the ''Nausicaa'' episode later in the book. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 Had Pyrrhus not fallen Stephen wonders what would have happened if significant moments history had ended differently. Had Pyrrhus not fallen, Greece might have remained a free country. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 Kingstown pier From the boys' laughter, obviously a popular place for spooning with girls. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 No-one here to hear Stephen considers that since no one who heard his joke was able to appreciate it, he should save it for a witticism during tonight's drinking with Mulligan and Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 breastwork fortification Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily Girls the boys know Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 infinite possibilities all the other events in history that didn't occur because another event did; Stephen wonders if it's even worth thinking of these alternate realities as existing, since they never came to pass Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 mirthless but with meaning Though they might not enjoy the joke, the boys do enjoy being able to laugh condescendingly at their teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 chosen all that part Stephen feels that all the Irish have taken on the role of jesters or servants to others, perhaps because their land had been so long run under by foreign people. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 For Haines's chapbook Stephen remarks that his joke on Kingstown Pier would probably please Haines enough to record, as with his earlier words on the cracked mirror as ''the symbol of Irish art''. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 swarthy having dark, olive-toned skin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily. Gerty possibly refers to the Gerty who is the focus of the ''Nausicaa'' episode later in the book. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 beldam old woman, crone Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 Kingstown pier From the boys' laughter, obviously a popular place for spooning with girls. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 What then Repeating his witticism for Haines and Mulligan would only make Stephen into a jester or servant, offering up his mind in return for a little laughter. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 Ethel, Nurse Callan seems a bit old for these boys to be whispering about, methinks. So perhaps is Lily. Hm. bbogle 2015-05-15 08:36 view
25 breastwork fortification Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 a disappointed bridge disappointed in that doesn't cross any water Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 infinite possibilities all the other events in history that didn't occur because another event did; Stephen wonders if it's even worth thinking of these alternate realities as existing, since they never came to pass Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 They knew The boys, despite their relative youth, have all had or know about sexual encounters. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 Ethel, Conjecture: Women named Edith & Gerty appear in Nausicaa; a girl named Lily appeared in Telemachus, the Carlisle girl. There is none named Ethel in Ulysses, unless that may be nurse Callan's name (as in Ithaca, it is noted her first name is unknown). I don't mean the boys are whispering about these particular women or girls: Rather I take it that the reader is to puzzle together these names with those recited in Ithaca: "a nurse, Miss Callan (Christian name unknown), a maid, Gertrude (Gerty, family name unknown)." The reader knows Gerty's family name from the Narrator. Note too these four names echo the four names (of the patron saints of the then United Kingdom) in Circe: "Patrick, Andrew, David, George, be thou anointed!" Four women's names in a boys school in Stephen's head; four saint's names in a brothel in Bloom's head.. wvarga7a1 2015-05-14 07:19 view
25 ghoststory A ghost story is much on Stephen's mind: the recurring vision of his dead mother, and of her death. The riddle he tells the class might be construed as an age-appropriate version of this ghost story. bbogle 2015-05-28 09:14 view
25 chosen all that part Stephen feels that all the Irish have taken on the role of jesters or servants to others, perhaps because their land had been so long run under by foreign people. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 For Haines's chapbook Stephen remarks that his joke on Kingstown Pier would probably please Haines enough to record, as with his earlier words on the cracked mirror as ''the symbol of Irish art''. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:19 view
25 swarthy having dark, olive-toned skin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:16 view
25 Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily. Gerty possibly refers to the Gerty who is the focus of the ''Nausicaa'' episode later in the book. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:20 view
25 beldam old woman, crone Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:17 view
25 Kingstown pier From the boys' laughter, obviously a popular place for spooning with girls. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:21 view
25 What then Repeating his witticism for Haines and Mulligan would only make Stephen into a jester or servant, offering up his mind in return for a little laughter. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:18 view
25 Ethel, Nurse Callan seems a bit old for these boys to be whispering about, methinks. So perhaps is Lily. Hm. bbogle 2015-05-15 08:36 view
31 O'Connell Daniel O'Connell, an Irish political leader from roughly a century before the time of the story; he was a champion of Irish Catholics and worked for them to be admitted to the British Parliament Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 Croppies a derogatory name for Irish rebels against British rule, in reference to their cropped (short) hair Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 fillibegs kilt Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 put on his topboots to ride to Dublin This is one of the best in-jokes in the book. The actual MP, Sir John Blackwood reportedly *died* in the act of putting on his boots to go to vote *against* the act of Union. (see Jeri Johnson, p. 779) Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 08:03 view
31 papishes Catholics (from papacy, in reference to their allegiance to the Pope); an image of the Catholic-Protestant violence Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 Mulligan, nine pounds Stephen mentally lists all his debts (it is interesting that he lists himself as indebted to Mulligan, although Stephen has paid the rent for their tower and given Mulligan drinking money) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 Croppies lie down Title of a Protestant, anti-Catholic rebel song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=44&v=orLeh3GsY6s bbogle 2015-05-28 12:02 view
31 orange ''Orange'' Irish were Protestants; the term comes from William of Orange (William III, of the house of Orange), a champion of Protestantism over Catholicism Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 Per vias rectas Latin for ''by the righteous paths'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 Albert Edward King Edward VII's official title while his mother, the long-lived Queen Victoria, held the throne. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 black north the north of Ireland was notorious for its religious and native Irish vs. British violence (thus, ''black'') Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 lump the cash Stephen has on hand Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 fenians members of organizations focusing on freeing Ireland from British rule Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 O'Connell Daniel O'Connell, an Irish political leader from roughly a century before the time of the story; he was a champion of Irish Catholics and worked for them to be admitted to the British Parliament Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 spindle side maternally Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 fillibegs kilt Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 planters covenant many of the pro-British Protestants were well-off planters, so this probably refers to some anti-Catholic resolution Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 Mulligan, nine pounds Stephen mentally lists all his debts (it is interesting that he lists himself as indebted to Mulligan, although Stephen has paid the rent for their tower and given Mulligan drinking money) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 Glorious, pious and immortal memory. The opening of the Orange Toast of loyal Irish Protestants. See: http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Orange_Toast bbogle 2015-05-28 11:54 view
31 demagogue a leader who inspires cultish devotion among their followers Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 Per vias rectas Latin for ''by the righteous paths'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 tory a conservative Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 black north the north of Ireland was notorious for its religious and native Irish vs. British violence (thus, ''black'') Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 tartan plaid Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 fenians members of organizations focusing on freeing Ireland from British rule Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 Good man Stephen ironically mentally congratulates Deasy's choice of maxims Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 Lal the ral the raThe rocky road to Dublin. Another Irish ballad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxBKgOyMzSc bbogle 2015-05-28 12:05 view
31 O'Connell Daniel O'Connell, an Irish political leader from roughly a century before the time of the story; he was a champion of Irish Catholics and worked for them to be admitted to the British Parliament Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 spindle side maternally Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 fillibegs kilt Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 planters covenant many of the pro-British Protestants were well-off planters, so this probably refers to some anti-Catholic resolution Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 Mulligan, nine pounds Stephen mentally lists all his debts (it is interesting that he lists himself as indebted to Mulligan, although Stephen has paid the rent for their tower and given Mulligan drinking money) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 Glorious, pious and immortal memory. The opening of the Orange Toast of loyal Irish Protestants. See: http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Orange_Toast bbogle 2015-05-28 11:54 view
31 demagogue a leader who inspires cultish devotion among their followers Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 tory a conservative Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 Croppies a derogatory name for Irish rebels against British rule, in reference to their cropped (short) hair Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 tartan plaid Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 papishes Catholics (from papacy, in reference to their allegiance to the Pope); an image of the Catholic-Protestant violence Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 Good man Stephen ironically mentally congratulates Deasy's choice of maxims Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 five weeks' board Was this where he was living before the Tower? If he'd been paid twice while living there, why didn't he pay her? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:18 view
31 Lal the ral the raThe rocky road to Dublin. Another Irish ballad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxBKgOyMzSc bbogle 2015-05-28 12:05 view
31 orange ''Orange'' Irish were Protestants; the term comes from William of Orange (William III, of the house of Orange), a champion of Protestantism over Catholicism Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 spindle side maternally Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 Albert Edward King Edward VII's official title while his mother, the long-lived Queen Victoria, held the throne. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 guinea A guinea was an old gold coin, worth slightly more than one pound sterling (21 shillings - 1.05 pound). The coin itself was not in circulation at that time but it was still used as a unit in betting on horses and in "aristocratic" contracts. Joyce himself made a point of borrowing in gentlemanly guineas, and so does Stephen. The subtlety of a contract in guineas being more upper class is also present in "A Mother" in Dubliners. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:23 view
31 planters covenant many of the pro-British Protestants were well-off planters, so this probably refers to some anti-Catholic resolution Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 lump the cash Stephen has on hand Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 Russell Presumably George William Russell (AE). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_William_Russell bbogle 2015-05-28 11:50 view
31 demagogue a leader who inspires cultish devotion among their followers Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 tory a conservative Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 Croppies a derogatory name for Irish rebels against British rule, in reference to their cropped (short) hair Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 tartan plaid Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 papishes Catholics (from papacy, in reference to their allegiance to the Pope); an image of the Catholic-Protestant violence Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 Good man Stephen ironically mentally congratulates Deasy's choice of maxims Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:31 view
31 Croppies lie down Title of a Protestant, anti-Catholic rebel song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=44&v=orLeh3GsY6s bbogle 2015-05-28 12:02 view
31 orange ''Orange'' Irish were Protestants; the term comes from William of Orange (William III, of the house of Orange), a champion of Protestantism over Catholicism Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
31 Per vias rectas Latin for ''by the righteous paths'' Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:27 view
31 Albert Edward King Edward VII's official title while his mother, the long-lived Queen Victoria, held the throne. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 black north the north of Ireland was notorious for its religious and native Irish vs. British violence (thus, ''black'') Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:28 view
31 lump the cash Stephen has on hand Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:30 view
31 Russell Presumably George William Russell (AE). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_William_Russell bbogle 2015-05-28 11:50 view
31 fenians members of organizations focusing on freeing Ireland from British rule Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:29 view
24 — You, Cochrane, what city sent for him? It seems history, we've already seen, is to blame; here, Stephen is obliged to teach history, toward which he holds a certain aversion, as will soon be established. A widespread re-evaluation of history and its significance concerned many modernist artists, including James Joyce. History therefore becomes an important motif in Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:37 view
24 figrolls sweet pastry containing figs Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Asculum Site of Pyrrhus's ultimately disastrous (to Pyrrhus's cause) victory over the Romans Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 Blake's wings of excess An allusion to two of the Devil's proverbs from Blake's "The Marriage of Heaven and Hell": http://goo.gl/CTwW0Z ryanshaw 2015-02-05 15:14 view
24 Vico Road Actual road, but also an allusion to Giambattista Vico who elaborated a cyclical view of history. See all of Finnegans Wake for more information. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:55 view
24 pier. a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 That phrase ''Another victory like that and we are done for''; Stephen imagines the sentence being spoken. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 the daughters of memory Haines' earlier casual comment in Telemachus about history being to blame has triggered many of Stephen's subsequent thoughts this day concerning the meaning, significance, and (un)reality of what we call history. Nestor is thematically concerned with history's fables leading so often to violence. To go deeper down this particular rabbit hole, see this 1902 essay by Joyce about the Irish poet James Clarence Mangan. A search on the page for the word daughters reveals the relevant paragraph. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:10 view
24 Cochrane One of Stephen's students (the setting has changed to the day school where Stephen teaches) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:24 view
24 figrolls sweet pastry containing figs Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Asculum Site of Pyrrhus's ultimately disastrous (to Pyrrhus's cause) victory over the Romans Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 Cochrane Based on Ellmann's evidence, the boys are about 14 years old. Tim Finnegan 2015-03-19 04:11 view
24 gorescarred That is, gorescarred precisely because it is a book of history, a parade of wars and crimes. At least, the word gorescarred signals to us Stephen's perspective. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:40 view
24 Pyrrhus, a pier Armstrong, not knowing the answer, jokes by declining the word as if it were a Latin noun. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Pyrrhus The term ''Pyrrhic victory'' is named after him, as many of his battles were won only through heavy losses that were ultimately disastrous (''Another victory like that and we are done for''). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 what city Stephen is in the middle of quizzing the boys on ancient history, specifically a battle of the Greek Pyrrhus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 figrolls sweet pastry containing figs Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Asculum Site of Pyrrhus's ultimately disastrous (to Pyrrhus's cause) victory over the Romans Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 gorescarred That is, gorescarred precisely because it is a book of history, a parade of wars and crimes. At least, the word gorescarred signals to us Stephen's perspective. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:40 view
24 Pyrrhus, a pier Armstrong, not knowing the answer, jokes by declining the word as if it were a Latin noun. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Pyrrhus The term ''Pyrrhic victory'' is named after him, as many of his battles were won only through heavy losses that were ultimately disastrous (''Another victory like that and we are done for''). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 what city Stephen is in the middle of quizzing the boys on ancient history, specifically a battle of the Greek Pyrrhus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 I hear the ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry, and time one livid final flame. A Blakean vision destined to recur in Stephen's day, here in apocalyptic combination with the fall of Troy and of local autonomy to the encroaching Roman Empire (e.g., Pyrrhus). See also passage in Proteus http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/43 and, most dramatically, in Circe http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/542 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
24 pier. a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 That phrase ''Another victory like that and we are done for''; Stephen imagines the sentence being spoken. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 Cochrane One of Stephen's students (the setting has changed to the day school where Stephen teaches) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:24 view
24 — You, Cochrane, what city sent for him? It seems history, we've already seen, is to blame; here, Stephen is obliged to teach history, toward which he holds a certain aversion, as will soon be established. A widespread re-evaluation of history and its significance concerned many modernist artists, including James Joyce. History therefore becomes an important motif in Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:37 view
24 Pyrrhus, a pier Armstrong, not knowing the answer, jokes by declining the word as if it were a Latin noun. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 Pyrrhus The term ''Pyrrhic victory'' is named after him, as many of his battles were won only through heavy losses that were ultimately disastrous (''Another victory like that and we are done for''). Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 what city Stephen is in the middle of quizzing the boys on ancient history, specifically a battle of the Greek Pyrrhus Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 I hear the ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry, and time one livid final flame. A Blakean vision destined to recur in Stephen's day, here in apocalyptic combination with the fall of Troy and of local autonomy to the encroaching Roman Empire (e.g., Pyrrhus). See also passage in Proteus http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/43 and, most dramatically, in Circe http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/542 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
24 Vico Road Actual road, but also an allusion to Giambattista Vico who elaborated a cyclical view of history. See all of Finnegans Wake for more information. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:55 view
24 pier. a dock or other walkway extending into water upon supports Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:22 view
24 That phrase ''Another victory like that and we are done for''; Stephen imagines the sentence being spoken. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:23 view
24 the daughters of memory Haines' earlier casual comment in Telemachus about history being to blame has triggered many of Stephen's subsequent thoughts this day concerning the meaning, significance, and (un)reality of what we call history. Nestor is thematically concerned with history's fables leading so often to violence. To go deeper down this particular rabbit hole, see this 1902 essay by Joyce about the Irish poet James Clarence Mangan. A search on the page for the word daughters reveals the relevant paragraph. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:10 view
24 Cochrane One of Stephen's students (the setting has changed to the day school where Stephen teaches) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 13:24 view
30 shillings, sixpences, halfcrowns units of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Iago Mr. Deasy's line ironically comes from the villain of Othello. This makes him not a mentor, like his Odysseyan counterpart Nestor, but another usurper; like Mulligan and Cranly, his words tempt Stephen to abandon his personal integrity. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 sovereign unit of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 The seas' ruler an epithet used earlier on Haines, referring to the British imperialist control of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 shillings, sixpences, halfcrowns units of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Iago Mr. Deasy's line ironically comes from the villain of Othello. This makes him not a mentor, like his Odysseyan counterpart Nestor, but another usurper; like Mulligan and Cranly, his words tempt Stephen to abandon his personal integrity. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 sovereign unit of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Three nooses Again, Stephen is conscious of being a servant; the three nooses are the three times he has accepted money for his work as a teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 emir a noble in a Middle Eastern country Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Iago Mr. Deasy's line ironically comes from the villain of Othello. This makes him not a mentor, like his Odysseyan counterpart Nestor, but another usurper; like Mulligan and Cranly, his words tempt Stephen to abandon his personal integrity. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 sovereign unit of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Three nooses Again, Stephen is conscious of being a servant; the three nooses are the three times he has accepted money for his work as a teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 emir a noble in a Middle Eastern country Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 The seas' ruler an epithet used earlier on Haines, referring to the British imperialist control of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 shillings, sixpences, halfcrowns units of British money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 Three nooses Again, Stephen is conscious of being a servant; the three nooses are the three times he has accepted money for his work as a teacher Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
30 emir a noble in a Middle Eastern country Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:33 view
30 The seas' ruler an epithet used earlier on Haines, referring to the British imperialist control of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:32 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 Agenbite of inwit "Agenbite of inwit" is Middle English, translating to "prick of remorse". Stephen is referring sarcastically to those who bathe more often than he does --perhaps they are trying to whiten their unclean consciences? "Yet here's a spot" refers to Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which the crazed Lady Macbeth comes to believe that she cannot wash the blood of her murders off her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 Would I make money by it Stephen, who is poor but feels that his art is above being traded for money from the English, voices what Mulligan is probably thinking (Mulligan sees his abilities -- and by extension, the abilities of the Irish -- as fungible goods to be traded for benefits form the English) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:20 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 Would I make money by it Stephen, who is poor but feels that his art is above being traded for money from the English, voices what Mulligan is probably thinking (Mulligan sees his abilities -- and by extension, the abilities of the Irish -- as fungible goods to be traded for benefits form the English) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:20 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 Agenbite of inwit "Agenbite of inwit" is Middle English, translating to "prick of remorse". Stephen is referring sarcastically to those who bathe more often than he does --perhaps they are trying to whiten their unclean consciences? "Yet here's a spot" refers to Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which the crazed Lady Macbeth comes to believe that she cannot wash the blood of her murders off her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
16 your 'your' must mean 'you Irish folk's' since Haines has shown no special respect for Stephen Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:16 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
16 Would I make money by it Stephen, who is poor but feels that his art is above being traded for money from the English, voices what Mulligan is probably thinking (Mulligan sees his abilities -- and by extension, the abilities of the Irish -- as fungible goods to be traded for benefits form the English) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:20 view
16 I see little hope Around this time Joyce hoped for a singing career Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:04 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 Agenbite of inwit "Agenbite of inwit" is Middle English, translating to "prick of remorse". Stephen is referring sarcastically to those who bathe more often than he does --perhaps they are trying to whiten their unclean consciences? "Yet here's a spot" refers to Shakespeare's Macbeth, in which the crazed Lady Macbeth comes to believe that she cannot wash the blood of her murders off her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
16 Would I make money by it? Stephen/Joyce had been selling his writing for years so this seems a reasonable question, though the answer is pretty obviously no. Haines seems to feel Stephen is a peasant who should be grateful just to be noticed Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:14 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
21 Hear, hear. Prolonged applause is this SD's sleepy brain finally awaking for the day? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:28 view
21 Michael an archangel often depicted as militant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 Photo girl Milly (Bloom's daughter) is working as a photographer's assistant. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 five fathoms unit of nautical measurement; five fathoms recalls Ariel's "full fathom five thy father lies" song in Shakespeare's The Tempest Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:40 view
21 Zut! Nom de Dieu! mild French oaths ("Well, shoot! Name of God!") of amazement Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
21 The void awaits Hell awaits all who try to bend religion's truth with strange logic. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 the Bannons A family name Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Bullock harbour a harbor southeast of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:41 view
21 Hear, hear. Prolonged applause Coming out of his revery, Stephen imagines fake applause. As a would-be poet, he is ever aware that despite the intelligence that lets him have such interior monologues, he has produced no great work to share with others) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 Photo girl Milly (Bloom's daughter) is working as a photographer's assistant. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 terrene earthly Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 five fathoms unit of nautical measurement; five fathoms recalls Ariel's "full fathom five thy father lies" song in Shakespeare's The Tempest Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:40 view
21 Zut! Nom de Dieu! mild French oaths ("Well, shoot! Name of God!") of amazement Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
21 Brief hinting of underwear? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:45 view
21 The void awaits Hell awaits all who try to bend religion's truth with strange logic. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 the Bannons A family name Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Bullock harbour a harbor southeast of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:41 view
21 Hear, hear. Prolonged applause Coming out of his revery, Stephen imagines fake applause. As a would-be poet, he is ever aware that despite the intelligence that lets him have such interior monologues, he has produced no great work to share with others) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 a sweet young thing Bannon's female find happens to be the young Milly Bloom, daughter of not-yet-introduced protagonist Leopold Bloom Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 terrene earthly Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 Westmeath an area in the middle of Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Two men Two men are watching the water, looking for the body of a man who drowned about nine days ago. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
21 Here I am. Like mother May, dead/absent Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:44 view
21 Michael an archangel often depicted as militant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 the Bannons A family name Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Bullock harbour a harbor southeast of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:41 view
21 Hear, hear. Prolonged applause Coming out of his revery, Stephen imagines fake applause. As a would-be poet, he is ever aware that despite the intelligence that lets him have such interior monologues, he has produced no great work to share with others) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 a sweet young thing Bannon's female find happens to be the young Milly Bloom, daughter of not-yet-introduced protagonist Leopold Bloom Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 terrene earthly Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 Westmeath an area in the middle of Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Two men Two men are watching the water, looking for the body of a man who drowned about nine days ago. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
21 businessman what sort of businessman? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:29 view
21 piously A mocking gesture to warn them it's a priest Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:45 view
21 Michael an archangel often depicted as militant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:44 view
21 Photo girl Milly (Bloom's daughter) is working as a photographer's assistant. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 five fathoms unit of nautical measurement; five fathoms recalls Ariel's "full fathom five thy father lies" song in Shakespeare's The Tempest Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:40 view
21 Zut! Nom de Dieu! mild French oaths ("Well, shoot! Name of God!") of amazement Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
21 a sweet young thing Bannon's female find happens to be the young Milly Bloom, daughter of not-yet-introduced protagonist Leopold Bloom Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:38 view
21 The void awaits Hell awaits all who try to bend religion's truth with strange logic. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:45 view
21 Westmeath an area in the middle of Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:39 view
21 Two men Two men are watching the water, looking for the body of a man who drowned about nine days ago. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:43 view
5 Epi oinopa ponton Greek for "the wine-dark sea", as Homer terms it in the Odyssey; afterwards paralleled by Mulligan with "the snot-green sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 Scutter shit http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:28 view
5 in a dream Stephen's recently deceased mother appears to Stephen in his dreams Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 The aunt Mulligan's aunt, like Mulligan, is an Anglicized Irishwoman; she looks askance at the unkempt Stephen and his family Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
5 The bard Referring to Stephen's literary interest and talents, but also linking Stephen to Shakespeare. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:23 view
5 you killed your mother Stephen, who recently abandoned his previously devout Catholicism, refused to kneel down and pray with his dying mother May (a young Joyce had done the same). He is berated both by Mulligan and his conscience, visited by dreams and visions of a reproachful ghost Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 great sweet mother From a Swinburne poem: "I will go back to the great sweet mother, / Mother and lover of men, the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 mummer a low actor, such as might perform at a parade or carnival Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 Thalatta Greek for "the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 new art colour cf the citizen's handkerchief on p318 Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 12:08 view
5 Algy Algernon Charles Swinburne, a controversial Victorian poet Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 Algy The phrase appears in Swineburne's The Triumph of Time (1866) nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:29 view
5 in a dream Stephen's recently deceased mother appears to Stephen in his dreams Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 you killed your mother Stephen, who recently abandoned his previously devout Catholicism, refused to kneel down and pray with his dying mother May (a young Joyce had done the same). He is berated both by Mulligan and his conscience, visited by dreams and visions of a reproachful ghost Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 great sweet mother From a Swinburne poem: "I will go back to the great sweet mother, / Mother and lover of men, the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 mummer a low actor, such as might perform at a parade or carnival Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 I must teach you Joyce had chosen to study Italian in school instead of Greek Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:54 view
5 Thalatta Greek for "the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 Algy Algernon Charles Swinburne, a controversial Victorian poet Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 Algy The phrase appears in Swineburne's The Triumph of Time (1866) nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:29 view
5 hyperborean living in or from the far north; from a mythical race that lived beyond the north wind Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 Epi oinopa ponton Greek for "the wine-dark sea", as Homer terms it in the Odyssey; afterwards paralleled by Mulligan with "the snot-green sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 Someone killed her God? Simon? Isn't this a logical fallacy? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:32 view
5 Thalatta! Thalatta! In Xenophon's Anabasis,'Thalatta! Thalatta!' (The sea! The sea!') is the cry of ecstasy uttered by the 10,000 Greeks upon summitting Mount Theches and seeing the Black Sea. The army had just come from Cyrus the Young's failed march on the Persian Empire. bekconn 2015-03-09 19:00 view
5 mummer Specifically an actor in a British seasonal folk play Min Wild 2015-07-09 11:02 view
5 mummer a low actor, such as might perform at a parade or carnival Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 The aunt Mulligan's aunt, like Mulligan, is an Anglicized Irishwoman; she looks askance at the unkempt Stephen and his family Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
5 Thalatta Greek for "the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 Algy Algernon Charles Swinburne, a controversial Victorian poet Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 great sweet mother From the Swinburne poem The Triumph of Time. nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:32 view
5 hyperborean living in or from the far north; from a mythical race that lived beyond the north wind Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 Epi oinopa ponton Greek for "the wine-dark sea", as Homer terms it in the Odyssey; afterwards paralleled by Mulligan with "the snot-green sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 snotgreen sea. pic: https://twitter.com/JJ_Gazette/status/673914678481985538 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:30 view
5 in a dream Stephen's recently deceased mother appears to Stephen in his dreams Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 The aunt Mulligan's aunt, like Mulligan, is an Anglicized Irishwoman; she looks askance at the unkempt Stephen and his family Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
5 The bard Referring to Stephen's literary interest and talents, but also linking Stephen to Shakespeare. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:23 view
5 you killed your mother Stephen, who recently abandoned his previously devout Catholicism, refused to kneel down and pray with his dying mother May (a young Joyce had done the same). He is berated both by Mulligan and his conscience, visited by dreams and visions of a reproachful ghost Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
5 great sweet mother From a Swinburne poem: "I will go back to the great sweet mother, / Mother and lover of men, the sea" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:41 view
5 great sweet mother From the Swinburne poem The Triumph of Time. nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:32 view
5 hyperborean By using "hyperborean" in the sense of "disbeliever", Mulligan is alluding to the introduction of Nietzsche's "Antichrist", which was a very new book at that time. He will allude to Nietzsche once more at the end of the chapter. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-26 17:35 view
5 hyperborean living in or from the far north; from a mythical race that lived beyond the north wind Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:40 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 that subject masturbation Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:25 view
12 In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus Sancti Latin Catholic blessing usually spoken while making the sign of the cross: "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit." Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
12 When I makes tea I makes tea A humorous Irish folkloric figure, possibly created by Mulligan, but presented to Haines half-mockingly as valid cultural material for his book. Mulligan couches vulgar anecdotes as Irish folklore, subtly mocking Ireland's ability to produce any nobel or heroic mythology. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus Sancti Latin Catholic blessing usually spoken while making the sign of the cross: "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit." Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 What sort of a kip is this Mulligan is peeved that the milkwoman has not appeared at the appointed time. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 In nomine Patris et Filii et Spiritus Sancti Latin Catholic blessing usually spoken while making the sign of the cross: "In the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit." Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 coming up is she already on the stairs, or coming up the road/path? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:32 view
12 What sort of a kip is this Mulligan is peeved that the milkwoman has not appeared at the appointed time. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
12 hewing thick slices from the loaf cf Bloom's genteel preparation of Molly's breakfast tray, p53 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 06:45 view
12 When I makes tea I makes tea A humorous Irish folkloric figure, possibly created by Mulligan, but presented to Haines half-mockingly as valid cultural material for his book. Mulligan couches vulgar anecdotes as Irish folklore, subtly mocking Ireland's ability to produce any nobel or heroic mythology. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
12 the fry eggs and rashers/bacon Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:31 view
12 What sort of a kip is this Mulligan is peeved that the milkwoman has not appeared at the appointed time. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:27 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
12 When I makes tea I makes tea A humorous Irish folkloric figure, possibly created by Mulligan, but presented to Haines half-mockingly as valid cultural material for his book. Mulligan couches vulgar anecdotes as Irish folklore, subtly mocking Ireland's ability to produce any nobel or heroic mythology. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
6 skivvy servant/maid Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 smokeblue note this change from "grey searching eyes"; Mulligan is mercurial, willing to change any part of himself to make the most gain Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 Caliban The wild native creature, a tragic fool-villain, from Shakespeare's The Tempest. In the prologue to The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde wrote, "The nineteenth-century dislike of realism is the rage of Caliban seeing his own face in a glass. The nineteenth-century dislike of romanticism is the rage of Caliban not seeing his own face in a glass." Mulligan uses the quotation to mock Stephen's obvious discomfort with difference between the image of himself that the mirror presents and his own idea of himself. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 Dottyville nickname for an insane asylum Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
6 I can't wear them Despite his refusal to pray with his dying mother, Stephen is observing the social custom of displaying one's mourning by wearing only black clothing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 skivvy servant/maid Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 smokeblue note this change from "grey searching eyes"; Mulligan is mercurial, willing to change any part of himself to make the most gain Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 g. p. i. "General paralysis of the insane" was a form of madness specifically related to syphilis at that time. This discussion (whether Joyce/Stephen had syphilis) is continuing even today: http://goo.gl/1SWMAO Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:44 view
6 Caliban The wild native creature, a tragic fool-villain, from Shakespeare's The Tempest. In the prologue to The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde wrote, "The nineteenth-century dislike of realism is the rage of Caliban seeing his own face in a glass. The nineteenth-century dislike of romanticism is the rage of Caliban not seeing his own face in a glass." Mulligan uses the quotation to mock Stephen's obvious discomfort with difference between the image of himself that the mirror presents and his own idea of himself. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 Dottyville nickname for an insane asylum Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 bile Part of the pattern of excretions: bile vomited. wvarga7a1 2015-11-02 06:40 view
6 I can't wear them Despite his refusal to pray with his dying mother, Stephen is observing the social custom of displaying one's mourning by wearing only black clothing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 Ursula Ursula is also the name of a saint, renowned for her chastity; Mulligan implies that she is chaste because she is so plain-looking. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 g. p. i. short for "general paralysis of the insane," the old term for schizophrenia; Stephen's descent from prize-winning, hyper-devout student to unwashed artist who refused to pray for his dying mother suggests a mental instability to people who observe him Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 threadbare cuffedge Mulligan has given Stephen some of his old clothing and shoes. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 Caliban The wild native creature, a tragic fool-villain, from Shakespeare's The Tempest. In the prologue to The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde wrote, "The nineteenth-century dislike of realism is the rage of Caliban seeing his own face in a glass. The nineteenth-century dislike of romanticism is the rage of Caliban not seeing his own face in a glass." Mulligan uses the quotation to mock Stephen's obvious discomfort with difference between the image of himself that the mirror presents and his own idea of himself. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 Lead him not into temptation. A reference to the Pater Noster, the original line reading 'lead us not into temptation'. Here it has potentially licentious connotations referring to how the aunt (apparently) seeks to keep Buck away from attractive women, and therefore continues his mocking of religious ritual. indigoecho 2015-03-24 07:30 view
6 Dottyville nickname for an insane asylum Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 I can't wear them Despite his refusal to pray with his dying mother, Stephen is observing the social custom of displaying one's mourning by wearing only black clothing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 g. p. i. Dementia from syphilis Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:52 view
6 Ursula Ursula is also the name of a saint, renowned for her chastity; Mulligan implies that she is chaste because she is so plain-looking. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 g. p. i. short for "general paralysis of the insane," the old term for schizophrenia; Stephen's descent from prize-winning, hyper-devout student to unwashed artist who refused to pray for his dying mother suggests a mental instability to people who observe him Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
6 threadbare cuffedge Mulligan has given Stephen some of his old clothing and shoes. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 skivvy servant/maid Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 smokeblue note this change from "grey searching eyes"; Mulligan is mercurial, willing to change any part of himself to make the most gain Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 He kills his mother Mulligan here is needling Stephen's greatest vulnerability, the conflict between art and duty Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:50 view
6 Ursula Ursula is also the name of a saint, renowned for her chastity; Mulligan implies that she is chaste because she is so plain-looking. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:38 view
6 g. p. i. short for "general paralysis of the insane," the old term for schizophrenia; Stephen's descent from prize-winning, hyper-devout student to unwashed artist who refused to pray for his dying mother suggests a mental instability to people who observe him Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
6 threadbare cuffedge Mulligan has given Stephen some of his old clothing and shoes. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:39 view
19 when I'm making the wine the miracle at Cana, when Jesus turned water into wine for wedding guests Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
19 Olivet The Mount of Olives, at the foot of which is the Garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus spent the night of his betrayal Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 Mercury's hat The description of Mulligan's hat as Mercury's points both to the fleetness of his capering, but also to his willingness to behave mercurially (i.e. changefully) in order to remain in control of situations Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:51 view
19 when I'm making the wine the miracle at Cana, when Jesus turned water into wine for wedding guests Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
19 a smooth silver case in which twinkled a green stone a little metaphor: Haines, the Englishman, offers Stephen an image of Ireland (the emerald) as a decoration in England's pocket Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:52 view
19 fortyfoot hole Probably not named for its depth, maybe for its association with the 42nd Highland Regiment of Foot Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:53 view
19 Mercury's hat The description of Mulligan's hat as Mercury's points both to the fleetness of his capering, but also to his willingness to behave mercurially (i.e. changefully) in order to remain in control of situations Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:51 view
19 when I'm making the wine the miracle at Cana, when Jesus turned water into wine for wedding guests Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
19 a smooth silver case in which twinkled a green stone a little metaphor: Haines, the Englishman, offers Stephen an image of Ireland (the emerald) as a decoration in England's pocket Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:52 view
19 tinderbox Self-consciously retro Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:48 view
19 Olivet The Mount of Olives, at the foot of which is the Garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus spent the night of his betrayal Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 a smooth silver case in which twinkled a green stone a little metaphor: Haines, the Englishman, offers Stephen an image of Ireland (the emerald) as a decoration in England's pocket Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:52 view
19 Three times a day, after meals if taken literally, this would imply SD and BM have been dining together consistently, without Haines Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:19 view
19 Olivet The Mount of Olives, at the foot of which is the Garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus spent the night of his betrayal Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:53 view
19 Mercury's hat The description of Mulligan's hat as Mercury's points both to the fleetness of his capering, but also to his willingness to behave mercurially (i.e. changefully) in order to remain in control of situations Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:51 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 made rapid crosses Mulligan continues to mock the Mass by making the sign of the cross (a Catholic hand gesture) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 untonsured Tonsuring is the practice of shaving off the crown of a priest or monk's hair (e.g. to show humility and/or religious devotion) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 untonsured So this is a nice touch to signal the absence of an absence hugo truyens 2015-03-09 16:54 view
3 Dedalus Does anyone know for sure if Joyce pronounced this DEED or DEAD? Tim Finnegan 2015-11-27 04:01 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei. With his morning shave, Mulligan begins a mockery of the mass that is sustained for much of the episode, complete with blessings and the shaving bowl as holy incense. This mockery is a subtle taunt to Stephen, who was extremely devout as a boy. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Kinch Mulligan's nickname for Stephen, who he describes as a "knife-blade" (the OED defines a kinch as a type of knot and I've never been able to find the word defined as a knife, but for the purposes of the novel it makes the most sense to go with Mulligan's definition). This nickname, which alludes to the sharpness of Stephen's intellect, is used somewhat patronizingly–Mulligan recognizes that Stephen has greater intellectual powers than him and is passively-aggressively jealous, but is also aware that Stephen does not use his mind to as great a social advantage as Mulligan does. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 Christine A jokingly female version of Christ Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 bearing a bowl it may also indicate the holy grail, the chalice in which Jesus' blood was supposedly caught by Joseph of Arimethea so that the prophecy could be fulfilled, "Not a drop of his blood shall touch the ground." This would set Buck up as aligned with the feminine, and invoke Stephen/Jesus against the mother figure that will haunt in coming passages. ghostprof 2015-02-05 18:58 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak Harry Blamires' The New Bloomsday Book suggests this is an allusion to the Trojan Horse meant to clue us to Mulligan's duplicitous nature. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-30 17:37 view
3 preacher's tone Mulligan continues to mock the mass Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 made rapid crosses Mulligan continues to mock the Mass by making the sign of the cross (a Catholic hand gesture) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 untonsured Tonsuring is the practice of shaving off the crown of a priest or monk's hair (e.g. to show humility and/or religious devotion) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei Translates to : I will go to the altar of G CarTay 2015-03-04 20:22 view
3 the tower As in Hamlet, the action commences as characters move among castle turrets, or their counterpart. Soon, as we shall see, thoughts of a ghost will preoccupy Stephen Dedalus, our broody prince. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:20 view
3 ouns Ouns is 'wounds', meaning, in the context, Christ's wounds. This info found here: http://goo.gl/Ikfyff nfraistat 2015-02-05 14:52 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei A line spoken by a priest during a Latin Catholic mass, meaning "I will go to the altar of God". Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Jesuit A Catholic order that organized many schools in Ireland. The Jesuits were characterized as skilled equivocators, using craftiness to answer unanswerable religious questions and also protecting the order during the time it was suppressed by the Pope. Stephen has been taught by Jesuits; Mulligan fears his subtle intellect, which often allows him to provide answers through roundabout logic (see his discussion of Hamlet, mentioned later in this episode and explored more fully in the episode Scylla and Charybdis). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 Chrysostomos chrys[o] = (Greek) gold, golden, golden yellow; + -ostome = (Greek) mouth, orifice; therefore, goldenmouth. Suggests Buck's lofty rhetoric is ornamentation lavished to conceal a plainer soul. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:49 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Spoken lines are indicated with an em dash Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 like pale oak The Trojan horse idea is intriguing-- 'equine' fits too. Are there further echoes anywhere? (It would be the Iliad not the Odyssey) Tim Finnegan 2015-12-08 15:03 view
3 bearing a bowl it may also indicate the holy grail, the chalice in which Jesus' blood was supposedly caught by Joseph of Arimethea so that the prophecy could be fulfilled, "Not a drop of his blood shall touch the ground." This would set Buck up as aligned with the feminine, and invoke Stephen/Jesus against the mother figure that will haunt in coming passages. ghostprof 2015-02-05 18:58 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
3 Chrysostomos Reference to Saint John Chrysostom, nicknamed "the golden-mouthed" for his speaking ability; Stephen links Mulligan's glibness to his gold-capped teeth Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 Buck Mulligan Buck Mulligan plays off the same rhythm of the name Oliver Gogarty. healeywi 2015-03-12 09:18 view
3 preacher's tone Mulligan continues to mock the mass Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 made rapid crosses Mulligan continues to mock the Mass by making the sign of the cross (a Catholic hand gesture) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 untonsured Tonsuring is the practice of shaving off the crown of a priest or monk's hair (e.g. to show humility and/or religious devotion) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 Stately Some ingenious critics have shown how the first sentence begins with the state and ends with a cross, highlighting the tension between nationality and religion Stephen has trying to escape since A Portrait... Also, the first and last letters here are inverted in the last word of the book (don't worry, no spoilers!). Also, in the Random House edition of the book, the first letters of each of the three parts of the book were printed in huge font, drawing speculation that they stood for the most important person in the life of the main character in that section ('S' here is for narcissistic Stephen, M (in 'Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish...') for Bloom's love of Molly, and, P (in 'Preparatory to anything else...') for Molly's pet name for husband, Poldy). HCE 2015-03-09 16:47 view
3 faced about "to turn and face in the opposite direction" (Macmillan Dictionary) grf 2015-04-15 19:11 view
3 Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed. i'd suggest that if you believe joyce counted the words in sentences you can compile a table of all the sentence lengths and see if the patterns hold globally. Tim Finnegan 2015-06-25 16:56 view
3 the tower As in Hamlet, the action commences as characters move among castle turrets, or their counterpart. Soon, as we shall see, thoughts of a ghost will preoccupy Stephen Dedalus, our broody prince. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:20 view
3 ouns Ouns is 'wounds', meaning, in the context, Christ's wounds. This info found here: http://goo.gl/Ikfyff nfraistat 2015-02-05 14:52 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei A line spoken by a priest during a Latin Catholic mass, meaning "I will go to the altar of God". Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Jesuit A Catholic order that organized many schools in Ireland. The Jesuits were characterized as skilled equivocators, using craftiness to answer unanswerable religious questions and also protecting the order during the time it was suppressed by the Pope. Stephen has been taught by Jesuits; Mulligan fears his subtle intellect, which often allows him to provide answers through roundabout logic (see his discussion of Hamlet, mentioned later in this episode and explored more fully in the episode Scylla and Charybdis). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 gunrest The stairs did have a sort of 'handrail' but it was just a straight metal pole, not something round you could mount. The roof was designed for one cannon on wheels linked to the central axis, which is the raised round central platform Joyce is referring to. (It's unlikely the builders called it that.) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 14:38 view
3 Chrysostomos chrys[o] = (Greek) gold, golden, golden yellow; + -ostome = (Greek) mouth, orifice; therefore, goldenmouth. Suggests Buck's lofty rhetoric is ornamentation lavished to conceal a plainer soul. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:49 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Spoken lines are indicated with an em dash Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 current The tower doesn't seem to be electrified yet (nor does 7 Eccles) Tim Finnegan 2015-12-08 14:59 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak The oak is also a symbol of England. ghostprof 2015-02-05 19:05 view
3 Thanks, old chap, he cried briskly. That will do nicely. Switch off the current, will you? Jorn Barger's interpretation: Mulligan is thanking God ("old chap") for the miracle of the shrill whistles answering from nowhere just in time for his Mass parody. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:22 view
3 Chrysostomos Reference to Saint John Chrysostom, nicknamed "the golden-mouthed" for his speaking ability; Stephen links Mulligan's glibness to his gold-capped teeth Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 bearing a bowl The bowl symbolises the chalice used in mass; introduces the "mockery of the mass" motif that will be present throughout the episode (and the book.) skelley 2015-02-05 17:13 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei. With his morning shave, Mulligan begins a mockery of the mass that is sustained for much of the episode, complete with blessings and the shaving bowl as holy incense. This mockery is a subtle taunt to Stephen, who was extremely devout as a boy. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Kinch Mulligan's nickname for Stephen, who he describes as a "knife-blade" (the OED defines a kinch as a type of knot and I've never been able to find the word defined as a knife, but for the purposes of the novel it makes the most sense to go with Mulligan's definition). This nickname, which alludes to the sharpness of Stephen's intellect, is used somewhat patronizingly–Mulligan recognizes that Stephen has greater intellectual powers than him and is passively-aggressively jealous, but is also aware that Stephen does not use his mind to as great a social advantage as Mulligan does. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
3 fearful "fearful": Gifford reads this as "frightening" (people, including Mulligan, were afraid of the erudition of Jesuits), Thornton as "afraid" (with reference to Romeo and Juliet:``Romeo, come forth, come forth thou fearful man"). `"Afraid" is more in the spirit of other lines of Mulligan. Yet, in the French translation approved by Joyce it is "abominable" and it is unlikely that Joyce would miss something like that in the first page. Perhaps the double meaning was intentional. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:00 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 Christine A jokingly female version of Christ Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 Two strong shrill whistles answered through the calm. Who is whistling back here? HCE 2015-03-09 16:37 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak Harry Blamires' The New Bloomsday Book suggests this is an allusion to the Trojan Horse meant to clue us to Mulligan's duplicitous nature. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-30 17:37 view
3 a mirror the shape of hand mirrors is a possible source for the traditional symbol for female/Venus: ♀ Tim Finnegan 2015-06-25 16:50 view
3 untonsured That is, Buck Mulligan is not very monk-like. In "The Dead," the Protestant Mr Browne is bewildered by the expressions of piety engaged in by the monks at the Mount Melleray monastery. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:09 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei A line spoken by a priest during a Latin Catholic mass, meaning "I will go to the altar of God". Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Jesuit A Catholic order that organized many schools in Ireland. The Jesuits were characterized as skilled equivocators, using craftiness to answer unanswerable religious questions and also protecting the order during the time it was suppressed by the Pope. Stephen has been taught by Jesuits; Mulligan fears his subtle intellect, which often allows him to provide answers through roundabout logic (see his discussion of Hamlet, mentioned later in this episode and explored more fully in the episode Scylla and Charybdis). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 Chrysostomos S. Bazargan suggests that this is a reference to Stephen or Joyce himself. See http://goo.gl/Vxt51u amWard 2015-04-30 00:23 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Spoken lines are indicated with an em dash Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:08 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak The oak is also a symbol of England. ghostprof 2015-02-05 19:05 view
3 Chrysostomos. Here's a picture of Chrysostomos (from Hagia Sophia in Istanbul): http://goo.gl/V30Bw5 Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:20 view
3 Chrysostomos Reference to Saint John Chrysostom, nicknamed "the golden-mouthed" for his speaking ability; Stephen links Mulligan's glibness to his gold-capped teeth Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 Two strong shrill whistles answered through the calm. The incoming mailboat hugo truyens 2015-03-09 17:04 view
3 a razor lay crossed Cross imagery? drlilithsternin 2015-03-05 03:59 view
3 bearing a bowl The bowl symbolises the chalice used in mass; introduces the "mockery of the mass" motif that will be present throughout the episode (and the book.) skelley 2015-02-05 17:13 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei. With his morning shave, Mulligan begins a mockery of the mass that is sustained for much of the episode, complete with blessings and the shaving bowl as holy incense. This mockery is a subtle taunt to Stephen, who was extremely devout as a boy. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:07 view
3 Kinch Mulligan's nickname for Stephen, who he describes as a "knife-blade" (the OED defines a kinch as a type of knot and I've never been able to find the word defined as a knife, but for the purposes of the novel it makes the most sense to go with Mulligan's definition). This nickname, which alludes to the sharpness of Stephen's intellect, is used somewhat patronizingly–Mulligan recognizes that Stephen has greater intellectual powers than him and is passively-aggressively jealous, but is also aware that Stephen does not use his mind to as great a social advantage as Mulligan does. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 Christine A jokingly female version of Christ Amanda Visconti 2015-01-29 13:09 view
3 the dark winding stairs Takes place at the Martello tower in Sandycove (outside of Dublin). Joyce briefly lived there with a friend, medical student Oliver St. John Gogarty) after whom Mulligan is modeled. In Dublin's Temple Bar district, there is a pub called the Oliver St. John Gogarty, and a statue of Joyce and Gogarty is outside of it commemorating their relationship. This particular stairway in the tower is an extremely narrow, dark, spiral staircase, that leads to the top of the tower. The view from the top overlooks the coastline and the town of Sandycove with Dublin in the distance. Martello towers were used for spotting incoming attacks; there are about 50 along Ireland's coast, many of which are used as locations in works of fiction. The Sandycove tower is now a museum called the James Joyce Tower. laurapavlo 2015-03-09 12:52 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak Harry Blamires' The New Bloomsday Book suggests this is an allusion to the Trojan Horse meant to clue us to Mulligan's duplicitous nature. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-30 17:37 view
3 untonsured That is, Buck Mulligan is not very monk-like. In "The Dead," the Protestant Mr Browne is bewildered by the expressions of piety engaged in by the monks at the Mount Melleray monastery. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:09 view
3 preacher's tone Mulligan continues to mock the mass Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:44 view
3 in rapt attention He knows the mailboat's outgoing routine, and plays on it Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:00 view
9 The twining stresses The lines of the song are built of pairs of unstressed-stressed syllables. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 Loyola founder of the Catholic Jesuit order; here, a symbol of rigid belief Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
9 Where now? Stephen, who no longer is certain of an afterlife, wonders what has become of his dead mother. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 loudly even if Haines is standing at the stairs, a loud call would be pretty faint by the time it reached the roof Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:47 view
9 And no more Mulligan is ironically singing the song Stephen mother asked him to sing for her on her deathbed. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 I sang it Could Mulligan know Stephen sang this then, so intensifying his assault? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 05:58 view
9 And no more If Mulligan is specifically making fun of Stephen's emotions around his mother's death by singing the same song, it seems brutal. Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:44 view
9 Fergus' song the Yeats song Mulligan was singing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 Sassenach Scottish vernacular for an Englishman Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 Where now? Stephen, who no longer is certain of an afterlife, wonders what has become of his dead mother. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 And no more Mulligan is ironically singing the song Stephen mother asked him to sing for her on her deathbed. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 holding down the long dark chords Was he playing the guitar or the piano? Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:08 view
9 Fergus' song the Yeats song Mulligan was singing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 Sassenach Scottish vernacular for an Englishman Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly The same cloud observed by Bloom in Calypso (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/58)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:55 view
9 a bowl of bitter waters. A reference to the bile of Stephen's mother and, by extension, his own act of insubordination by not praying for her. indigoecho 2015-03-27 06:40 view
9 The twining stresses The lines of the song are built of pairs of unstressed-stressed syllables. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 Loyola founder of the Catholic Jesuit order; here, a symbol of rigid belief Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
9 Fergus' song the Yeats song Mulligan was singing Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 Sassenach Scottish vernacular for an Englishman Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 twining entwining, pronounced with long i Tim Finnegan 2015-12-23 02:57 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly The same cloud observed by Bloom in Calypso (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/58)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:55 view
9 rashers. sausages, cf Bloom's cooking for himself and Molly Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:36 view
9 The twining stresses The lines of the song are built of pairs of unstressed-stressed syllables. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 Loyola founder of the Catholic Jesuit order; here, a symbol of rigid belief Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
9 Where now? Stephen, who no longer is certain of an afterlife, wonders what has become of his dead mother. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:31 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly, Although it seems synchronized with Bloom's cloud in episode 4, meteorologically they must be miles apart. Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:51 view
9 And no more Mulligan is ironically singing the song Stephen mother asked him to sing for her on her deathbed. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:32 view
9 White breast of the dim sea a further quote from the yeats lyric Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:45 view
22 up the pole Pregnant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:36 view
22 key Mulligan succeeds in getting the key from Stephen, effectively shutting him out of his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
22 go to God Interpretation: Why does Joyce have Mulligan exclaim "Go to God"? We might expect "Go to Hell." This exclamation appears to be the first instance of Joyce throwing the reader a clue as to his method: Take something familiar (from Homer, Dante, or Shakespeare) and invert it. Joseph Campbell writes (Mythic Worlds, Modern Words, pg. 15), "Dante depicts Florence as Hell. Joyce reverses this idea: he depicts hell as Dublin." Hence "Go to God" that reverses "Go to Hell" indicates the reader is "not in Kansas anymore." wvarga7a1 2015-05-13 22:27 view
22 Uebermensch Nietzsche's "Superman" or ideal for all humanity Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:37 view
22 creek just a narrowing inlet? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:49 view
22 Seymour a friend of Mulligan's, mentioned earlier when Mulligan offered to rag Haines for bothering Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:06 view
22 up the pole Pregnant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:36 view
22 key Mulligan succeeds in getting the key from Stephen, effectively shutting him out of his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
22 Uebermensch Nietzsche's "Superman" or ideal for all humanity Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:37 view
22 Seymour a friend of Mulligan's, mentioned earlier when Mulligan offered to rag Haines for bothering Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:06 view
22 Zarathustra An ancient religious poet; Thus Spake Zarathustra is the name of a late-19th-century book by Nietzsche Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
22 Uebermensch Nietzsche's "Superman" or ideal for all humanity Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:37 view
22 Seymour a friend of Mulligan's, mentioned earlier when Mulligan offered to rag Haines for bothering Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:06 view
22 stew the context suggests cramming for army exams? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 10:51 view
22 Zarathustra An ancient religious poet; Thus Spake Zarathustra is the name of a late-19th-century book by Nietzsche Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
22 up the pole Pregnant Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:36 view
22 key Mulligan succeeds in getting the key from Stephen, effectively shutting him out of his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
22 Zarathustra An ancient religious poet; Thus Spake Zarathustra is the name of a late-19th-century book by Nietzsche Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:05 view
18 the Muglins dangerous rocks in the waters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:56 view
18 The Father and the Son idea An interpretation of Hamlet in which Hamlet and the murdered king correspond to Jesus and the Father image of God; both Hamlet and God's Father/Son relationship are paralleled in this book Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:01 view
18 a blithe broadly smiling face Mulligan hints at his bad side by mocking a serious theme of the book (the father/Son relationship will be paralleled in Bloom/Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
18 southward actually NW to SE, joyce's mental compass is skewy Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:16 view
18 The Father and the Son idea. The Son striving to be atoned with the Father. Also an allusion to the Odyssean thrust of this episode: that the son Telemachus (Stephen) seeks atonement with Odysseus (Bloom). bbogle 2015-03-26 08:09 view
18 My mother's a jew, my father's a bird Jesus's mother Mary; the dove form of the Holy Spirit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:55 view
18 He himself Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:58 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
18 The seas' ruler Haines is English, and at that time Great Britain's impressive fleet had virtual sovereignty of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
18 Japhet in search of a father! Japhet: son of Noah and progenitor of European nations. But also Telemachus (Stephen) in search of Odysseus (Bloom). Why should Mulligan compare Stephen to Japhet? Perhaps because Stephen had once declared his intention "to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." bbogle 2015-03-26 08:21 view
18 the Muglins dangerous rocks in the waters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:56 view
18 The Father and the Son idea An interpretation of Hamlet in which Hamlet and the murdered king correspond to Jesus and the Father image of God; both Hamlet and God's Father/Son relationship are paralleled in this book Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:01 view
18 a blithe broadly smiling face Mulligan hints at his bad side by mocking a serious theme of the book (the father/Son relationship will be paralleled in Bloom/Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
18 saw his own image what's going on here? SD notices BM noticing SD's resemblance to Hamlet? BM can't bring himself to tease SD more? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:09 view
18 these cliffs The path they're walking on is at the edge of a 30 foot drop Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:08 view
18 The Father and the Son idea. The Son striving to be atoned with the Father. Also an allusion to the Odyssean thrust of this episode: that the son Telemachus (Stephen) seeks atonement with Odysseus (Bloom). bbogle 2015-03-26 08:09 view
18 Joseph the joiner In Christianity, Mary's husband Joseph is a carpenter Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:54 view
18 He proves by algebra that Hamlet's grandson is Shakespeare's grandfather and that he himself is the ghost of his own father Mulligan sarcastically makes a muddle of Stephen's Hamlet theory, making Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:57 view
18 The seas' ruler Haines is English, and at that time Great Britain's impressive fleet had virtual sovereignty of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
18 Japhet in search of a father! Japhet: son of Noah and progenitor of European nations. But also Telemachus (Stephen) in search of Odysseus (Bloom). Why should Mulligan compare Stephen to Japhet? Perhaps because Stephen had once declared his intention "to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." bbogle 2015-03-26 08:21 view
18 the Muglins dangerous rocks in the waters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:56 view
18 The Father and the Son idea An interpretation of Hamlet in which Hamlet and the murdered king correspond to Jesus and the Father image of God; both Hamlet and God's Father/Son relationship are paralleled in this book Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:01 view
18 pique peaks... pique Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:06 view
18 O, shade of Kinch the elder! Mulligan laughs, picturing the differences between Stephen's charismatic father and Stephen; Japhet, one of Noah's sons, reinforces the father-son relationship motif Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
18 Joseph the joiner In Christianity, Mary's husband Joseph is a carpenter Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:54 view
18 He proves by algebra that Hamlet's grandson is Shakespeare's grandfather and that he himself is the ghost of his own father Mulligan sarcastically makes a muddle of Stephen's Hamlet theory, making Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:57 view
18 The seas' ruler Haines is English, and at that time Great Britain's impressive fleet had virtual sovereignty of the seas Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
18 a sail tacking by the Muglins I can't help thinking this is also a reference to the perils of being caught between the Scylla and Charybdis; rather, the risk of tacking too close to Mulligan. bbogle 2015-03-26 08:16 view
18 My mother's a jew, my father's a bird Jesus's mother Mary; the dove form of the Holy Spirit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:55 view
18 He himself Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:58 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
18 O, shade of Kinch the elder! Mulligan laughs, picturing the differences between Stephen's charismatic father and Stephen; Japhet, one of Noah's sons, reinforces the father-son relationship motif Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
18 Joseph the joiner In Christianity, Mary's husband Joseph is a carpenter Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:54 view
18 He proves by algebra that Hamlet's grandson is Shakespeare's grandfather and that he himself is the ghost of his own father Mulligan sarcastically makes a muddle of Stephen's Hamlet theory, making Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:57 view
18 a blithe broadly smiling face Mulligan hints at his bad side by mocking a serious theme of the book (the father/Son relationship will be paralleled in Bloom/Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
18 a sail tacking by the Muglins I can't help thinking this is also a reference to the perils of being caught between the Scylla and Charybdis; rather, the risk of tacking too close to Mulligan. bbogle 2015-03-26 08:16 view
18 My mother's a jew, my father's a bird Jesus's mother Mary; the dove form of the Holy Spirit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:55 view
18 He himself Haines confused as to whether Hamlet or Stephen is referred to as the ghost of his own father Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:58 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
18 O, shade of Kinch the elder! Mulligan laughs, picturing the differences between Stephen's charismatic father and Stephen; Japhet, one of Noah's sons, reinforces the father-son relationship motif Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:16 view
17 To the secretary of state for war The Martello tower shared by Stephen, Mulligan, and Haines was originally a defensive structure --thus the strange landlord. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly. Notice how this Christian reference sets up Mulligan to betray Stephen. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
17 Thomas Aquinas Doctor of the Catholic Church and subtle logician (Mulligan is referring to Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 ladder Historically there had been a ladder that could be pulled up, but it's inconceivable the milkwoman climbed a ladder carrying her can, so this must be the later immovable iron staircase Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:57 view
17 ashplant a walking-stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Latin quarter hat Stephen wears an unfashionable hat, possibly obtained while studying in the student area of Paris Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
17 Billy Pitt Many towers like Stephen's were built around the coasts of Great Britain during the Napoleonic wars. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly Mulligan plays with sound, mimicking the description of Peter after he betrays Jesus three times ("And going forth, he wept bitterly".) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Thomas Aquinas Doctor of the Catholic Church and subtle logician (Mulligan is referring to Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 ashplant a walking-stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Latin quarter hat Stephen wears an unfashionable hat, possibly obtained while studying in the student area of Paris Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
17 his trunk page 6 had "his strong wellknit trunk" Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:02 view
17 Billy Pitt Many towers like Stephen's were built around the coasts of Great Britain during the Napoleonic wars. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly Mulligan plays with sound, mimicking the description of Peter after he betrays Jesus three times ("And going forth, he wept bitterly".) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Did you bring the key? Mulligan is hinting he wants it, he can't really think Stephen left it in the lock Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:06 view
17 To the secretary of state for war The Martello tower shared by Stephen, Mulligan, and Haines was originally a defensive structure --thus the strange landlord. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 He walked on https://goo.gl/maps/Cir9i Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 17:33 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly. Notice how this Christian reference sets up Mulligan to betray Stephen. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
17 Billy Pitt Many towers like Stephen's were built around the coasts of Great Britain during the Napoleonic wars. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly Mulligan plays with sound, mimicking the description of Peter after he betrays Jesus three times ("And going forth, he wept bitterly".) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Agenbite of inwit. typo in 1st edition, deleted Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:05 view
17 To the secretary of state for war The Martello tower shared by Stephen, Mulligan, and Haines was originally a defensive structure --thus the strange landlord. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 And going forth he met Butterly. Notice how this Christian reference sets up Mulligan to betray Stephen. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
17 Thomas Aquinas Doctor of the Catholic Church and subtle logician (Mulligan is referring to Stephen) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:17 view
17 ashplant a walking-stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:18 view
17 Latin quarter hat Stephen wears an unfashionable hat, possibly obtained while studying in the student area of Paris Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:19 view
10 Liliata rutilantium Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at May's deathbed Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 us So Mulligan was woken, too Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:52 view
10 blood of squashed lice Supposedly the color 'puce' (see Mulligan's gloves below) was favored to conceal lousebloodstains Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:33 view
10 dancecards A dancecard was a card used in a ball with a list of dance partners. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:09 view
10 blood of squashed lice Stephen transitions from imagining May's pleasant childhood memories to the hardships she faced as a mother of many children living in poverty (Stephen's father, while charismatic and popular, is a drinker and not a consistent breadwinner) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 Liliata rutilantium Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at May's deathbed Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 I am the boyThat can enjoyIn align stanza Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:51 view
10 blood of squashed lice Stephen transitions from imagining May's pleasant childhood memories to the hardships she faced as a mother of many children living in poverty (Stephen's father, while charismatic and popular, is a drinker and not a consistent breadwinner) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 No, mother Stephen revolts against the image of his reproachful mother, whose guilt threatens Stephen's sense of independence from the stultifying confines of religion and Irish tradition. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
10 birdcage Alderman Hooper gave the Blooms a stuffed owl as a wedding present, see p109 and 660 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:50 view
10 Her secrets Stephen moves from images of the trifles May left behind (e.g. dancecards hinting at a life before she was a mother) to imagined memories from May's childhood. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 blood of squashed lice Stephen transitions from imagining May's pleasant childhood memories to the hardships she faced as a mother of many children living in poverty (Stephen's father, while charismatic and popular, is a drinker and not a consistent breadwinner) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 No, mother Stephen revolts against the image of his reproachful mother, whose guilt threatens Stephen's sense of independence from the stultifying confines of religion and Irish tradition. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
10 a gaud of amber beads Bloom gave Milly an amberoid necklace, see p60 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:48 view
10 Her secrets Stephen moves from images of the trifles May left behind (e.g. dancecards hinting at a life before she was a mother) to imagined memories from May's childhood. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 Liliata rutilantium Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at May's deathbed Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
10 locked drawer We'll visit Bloom's locked drawer in episode 17; May's 'secrets' are just private memories Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 06:02 view
10 No, mother Stephen revolts against the image of his reproachful mother, whose guilt threatens Stephen's sense of independence from the stultifying confines of religion and Irish tradition. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
10 Liliata rutilantium te confessorum turma circumdet; iubilantium te virginum chorus excipiat. Stephen seems genuinely upset, and may use this cheerful Latin formula to soothe his nerves Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:34 view
10 Her secrets Stephen moves from images of the trifles May left behind (e.g. dancecards hinting at a life before she was a mother) to imagined memories from May's childhood. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:30 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
15 Bill, sir? she said, halting. Well, it's seven mornings a pint at two pence is seven twos is a shilling and twopence over and these three mornings a quart at fourpence is three quarts is a shilling and one and two is two and two, sir. Despite being characterized by the men that receive her as lowly, pedestrian, or unrefined, she is able to deftly perform complex computations. A statement, perhaps, on the capabilities of subject peoples underestimated by the more refined oppressors? joseph.koivisto 2015-03-08 21:39 view
15 stony Mulligan is "as dry as stone" and needs a drink Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
15 stony Mulligan is "as dry as stone" and needs a drink Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
15 Ask nothing more of me, sweet. All I can give you I give. these are the opening lines of the song that continues below Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:02 view
15 stony Mulligan is "as dry as stone" and needs a drink Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
7 Magdalen Magdalen College, part of the University of Oxford Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 Cranly Cranly, like Mulligan, was once (in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) one of Stephen's best friends, but since fell out of favor after Stephen questions his integrity (a pattern with Stephen; like Mulligan, Cranly had counseled Stephen to complete an Easter ritual to please his mother even though Stephen is no longer sure he is a believer). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 Young shouts of moneyed voices in Clive Kempthorpe's rooms. Here Buck professes a readiness to abuse Haines if it will please Stephen. Stephen never went to Oxford and never met Clive Kempthorpe, but Buck did. Earlier Buck flattered Stephen, speaking from experience: "You have the real Oxford manner." Buck and Haines likely met at Oxford. Buck has previously told Stephen the story of Clive Kempthorpe's brutal hazing there, and he may well have participated in that ugly event. Stephen's ability to visualize the story he's heard second- or third-hand, populating it with rich detail ― including the presence of a deaf gardener outside (probably his Matthew Arnold face is intended to help fix the scene at Oxford) ― is remarkable. (Note that Arnold's 1860 work, On Translating Homer, might alone boost his significance to Joyce.) bbogle 2015-05-12 21:09 view
7 oxy from Oxford College Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 Bray Head apparently Joyce's error-- Howth might have been visible but not Bray Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:45 view
7 Matthew Arnold A popular Victorian poet; the gardener, though masked with the face of culture, is deaf to the violence going on among the nearby students Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 aproned The garb of a craftsman, one who creates, an artist. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:39 view
7 only one that knows what you are Mulligan, for all his willingness to do anything for gain, is one of the few people who recognize that Stephen is intelligent and not insane or useless. However, Stephen cannot reconcile himself with Mulligan's willingness to serve up Ireland to make a dollar, and Mulligan knows Stephen sees this side of him and is angered. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 tin money/fortune Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 ox This bovine ceremony, rife with ritual violence, suggests foreshadowing of the Nestor episode, as well as Oxen of the Sun. We may also consider that Leopold Bloom has been psychically gelded. This little imagining of Stephen's probably bears more weight than is superficially apparent. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:30 view
7 a symbol of Irish art Stephen sees Irish art is an attempt to mirror the real, marred by the Irish artist's toadying to the British ideal of art. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
7 Magdalen Magdalen College, part of the University of Oxford Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 Cranly Cranly, like Mulligan, was once (in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) one of Stephen's best friends, but since fell out of favor after Stephen questions his integrity (a pattern with Stephen; like Mulligan, Cranly had counseled Stephen to complete an Easter ritual to please his mother even though Stephen is no longer sure he is a believer). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 Young shouts of moneyed voices in Clive Kempthorpe's rooms. Here Buck professes a readiness to abuse Haines if it will please Stephen. Stephen never went to Oxford and never met Clive Kempthorpe, but Buck did. Earlier Buck flattered Stephen, speaking from experience: "You have the real Oxford manner." Buck and Haines likely met at Oxford. Buck has previously told Stephen the story of Clive Kempthorpe's brutal hazing there, and he may well have participated in that ugly event. Stephen's ability to visualize the story he's heard second- or third-hand, populating it with rich detail ― including the presence of a deaf gardener outside (probably his Matthew Arnold face is intended to help fix the scene at Oxford) ― is remarkable. (Note that Arnold's 1860 work, On Translating Homer, might alone boost his significance to Joyce.) bbogle 2015-05-12 21:09 view
7 oxy from Oxford College Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 debagged Joyce's notes suggest Stephen is falsely 'remembering' Oxford where he's never been, confusing words like 'debagged' and 'gilded' Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:44 view
7 To ourselves... new paganism... omphalos. Stephen moves from thoughts of Matthew Arnold's writings to the idea of of the omphalos, or navel (Martello Tower is referred to as the omphalos). Disturbed by the image of violence, Stephen is moved to forgive Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
7 watching narrowly Watching narrowly....Could this be another of Stephen's contemplations on the God of Creation who has refined Himself out of His Work, watching narrowly from the sidelines? A deaf gardener mowing down the grass stems: that would be an interesting metaphor. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:38 view
7 ragging Stephen imagines a schoolboy being humiliated by his fellow classmates, a story he has probably heard from Mulligan before. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 Hellenise make into something appreciative of and producing arts and culture similar to that of Golden Age Greece Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 Parried Who's parried whom? SD sees this as a duel, each trying to gain some advantage Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:37 view
7 ox This bovine ceremony, rife with ritual violence, suggests foreshadowing of the Nestor episode, as well as Oxen of the Sun. We may also consider that Leopold Bloom has been psychically gelded. This little imagining of Stephen's probably bears more weight than is superficially apparent. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:30 view
7 He fears the lancet of my art Stephen, the unhygienic, is superstitiously fearful of modern medicine (he is also afraid of thunder--ironic, given his apostasy-- and dogs). Mulligan fears Stephen's superior wit, and thus keeps his jealousy and dislike hidden. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
7 Cough it up. In keeping with the motif of phlegm and expectoration persistent in this episode. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:28 view
7 Magdalen Magdalen College, part of the University of Oxford Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 oxy or ox-like? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:59 view
7 Cranly Cranly, like Mulligan, was once (in Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man) one of Stephen's best friends, but since fell out of favor after Stephen questions his integrity (a pattern with Stephen; like Mulligan, Cranly had counseled Stephen to complete an Easter ritual to please his mother even though Stephen is no longer sure he is a believer). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 they This puzzled me for a long time. Who are "they?" See comments in following paragraphs. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:39 view
7 oxy from Oxford College Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 To ourselves... new paganism... omphalos. Stephen moves from thoughts of Matthew Arnold's writings to the idea of of the omphalos, or navel (Martello Tower is referred to as the omphalos). Disturbed by the image of violence, Stephen is moved to forgive Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
7 watching narrowly Watching narrowly....Could this be another of Stephen's contemplations on the God of Creation who has refined Himself out of His Work, watching narrowly from the sidelines? A deaf gardener mowing down the grass stems: that would be an interesting metaphor. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:38 view
7 ragging Stephen imagines a schoolboy being humiliated by his fellow classmates, a story he has probably heard from Mulligan before. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 Hellenise make into something appreciative of and producing arts and culture similar to that of Golden Age Greece Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 jalap to Zulus Mulligan is alliterating again. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:07 view
7 gilded Debagged: to remove the trousers; in this context a more intimate amputation is implied, and there's probable wordplay at work here involving gilded/gelded. Don't be steered wrong. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:20 view
7 He fears the lancet of my art Stephen, the unhygienic, is superstitiously fearful of modern medicine (he is also afraid of thunder--ironic, given his apostasy-- and dogs). Mulligan fears Stephen's superior wit, and thus keeps his jealousy and dislike hidden. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
7 Cough it up. In keeping with the motif of phlegm and expectoration persistent in this episode. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:28 view
7 Matthew Arnold A popular Victorian poet; the gardener, though masked with the face of culture, is deaf to the violence going on among the nearby students Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 only one that knows what you are Mulligan, for all his willingness to do anything for gain, is one of the few people who recognize that Stephen is intelligent and not insane or useless. However, Stephen cannot reconcile himself with Mulligan's willingness to serve up Ireland to make a dollar, and Mulligan knows Stephen sees this side of him and is angered. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 they This puzzled me for a long time. Who are "they?" See comments in following paragraphs. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:39 view
7 tin money/fortune Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 To ourselves... new paganism... omphalos. Stephen moves from thoughts of Matthew Arnold's writings to the idea of of the omphalos, or navel (Martello Tower is referred to as the omphalos). Disturbed by the image of violence, Stephen is moved to forgive Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
7 Shouts from the open window Compare to schoolyard shouts heard outside the window in Nestor, and Stephen's famous declaration that "God is a shout in the street." bbogle 2015-05-12 21:35 view
7 a symbol of Irish art Stephen sees Irish art is an attempt to mirror the real, marred by the Irish artist's toadying to the British ideal of art. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
7 ragging Stephen imagines a schoolboy being humiliated by his fellow classmates, a story he has probably heard from Mulligan before. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 Hellenise make into something appreciative of and producing arts and culture similar to that of Golden Age Greece Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 To ourselves "To ourselves" is the English translation of the slogan "Sinn Fein". Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:06 view
7 gilded Debagged: to remove the trousers; in this context a more intimate amputation is implied, and there's probable wordplay at work here involving gilded/gelded. Don't be steered wrong. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:20 view
7 He fears the lancet of my art Stephen, the unhygienic, is superstitiously fearful of modern medicine (he is also afraid of thunder--ironic, given his apostasy-- and dogs). Mulligan fears Stephen's superior wit, and thus keeps his jealousy and dislike hidden. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
7 if you and I could only work together we might do something for the island. Hellenise it Joyce's strategy-- eventually effective I think-- was to reflect back a shocking, liberating uncensored portrait of Gogarty among the rest Tim Finnegan 2016-01-20 04:04 view
7 Matthew Arnold A popular Victorian poet; the gardener, though masked with the face of culture, is deaf to the violence going on among the nearby students Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:35 view
7 aproned The garb of a craftsman, one who creates, an artist. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:39 view
7 only one that knows what you are Mulligan, for all his willingness to do anything for gain, is one of the few people who recognize that Stephen is intelligent and not insane or useless. However, Stephen cannot reconcile himself with Mulligan's willingness to serve up Ireland to make a dollar, and Mulligan knows Stephen sees this side of him and is angered. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 tin money/fortune Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:36 view
7 Shouts from the open window Compare to schoolyard shouts heard outside the window in Nestor, and Stephen's famous declaration that "God is a shout in the street." bbogle 2015-05-12 21:35 view
7 a symbol of Irish art Stephen sees Irish art is an attempt to mirror the real, marred by the Irish artist's toadying to the British ideal of art. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:37 view
23 a seal's is this Mulligan or a real seal? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:33 view
23 Usurper Ulysses parallels the problem of Penelope's suitors in the Odyssey with a series of similarly morally-suspect "usurper"s: the British (usurping Ireland's culture), various men who have dubious relationships with Leopold Bloom's wife Molly (e.g. Hugh Boylan) and Mulligan (who subtly tries to break Stephen's determination to be a free-willed artist, and also ultimately usurps his home). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:31 view
23 The Ship A tavern Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:34 view
23 smiling at wild Irish Stephen imagines that Haines condescends to him because he is an Irishman -- more of a curious freak than a genius. The text, though, shows nothing of Haines to suggest he is not sincere in his offer of friendship. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 Home also I cannot go. Stephen has about had it with Mulligan, and does not feel he could return to the tower to sleep (there is also the problem of no longer having the key); "home", now referring to the place his immediate family lives, is also not an option -- the family has broken up after May's death, and there is possibly some anger there over Stephen's refusal to pray for her. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:33 view
23 Liliata rutilantium.Turma circumdet.Jubilantium te virginum. Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at the deathbed of May, Stephen's mother Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 I will not sleep here tonight. Like Telemachus, Stephen (alternatively Hamlet/Shakespeare/Telemachus) has been thrust from his home and into his quest, thus initiating the dynamic action of the drama; unlike Telemachus, Stephen is not consciously aware that the object of his quest is a father-figure. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:47 view
23 Liliata rutilantium.Turma circumdet.Jubilantium te virginum. Does Stephen find these words soothing? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:31 view
23 Usurper Ulysses parallels the problem of Penelope's suitors in the Odyssey with a series of similarly morally-suspect "usurper"s: the British (usurping Ireland's culture), various men who have dubious relationships with Leopold Bloom's wife Molly (e.g. Hugh Boylan) and Mulligan (who subtly tries to break Stephen's determination to be a free-willed artist, and also ultimately usurps his home). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:31 view
23 The Ship A tavern Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:34 view
23 smiling at wild Irish Stephen imagines that Haines condescends to him because he is an Irishman -- more of a curious freak than a genius. The text, though, shows nothing of Haines to suggest he is not sincere in his offer of friendship. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 Home also I cannot go See Ellmann's biography of Joyce for parallels to Joyce's exit from the Martello tower. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:32 view
23 A voice Mulligan's, whose voice is "sweettoned": he's able to be "golden-mouthed" or honey-tongued when he wishes Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:02 view
23 Horn of a bull, hoof of a horse, smile of a Saxon. Stephen thinks his own version of a saying for three things a person should never trust. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:35 view
23 Usurper Ulysses parallels the problem of Penelope's suitors in the Odyssey with a series of similarly morally-suspect "usurper"s: the British (usurping Ireland's culture), various men who have dubious relationships with Leopold Bloom's wife Molly (e.g. Hugh Boylan) and Mulligan (who subtly tries to break Stephen's determination to be a free-willed artist, and also ultimately usurps his home). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:31 view
23 A voice, sweettoned and sustained, called to him from the sea. Turning the curve he waved his hand. It called again. Mayn't this be conceived of as the first siren's call heard in Ulysses? Aye, it may. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:19 view
23 The Ship A tavern Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:34 view
23 smiling at wild Irish Stephen imagines that Haines condescends to him because he is an Irishman -- more of a curious freak than a genius. The text, though, shows nothing of Haines to suggest he is not sincere in his offer of friendship. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 Home also I cannot go See Ellmann's biography of Joyce for parallels to Joyce's exit from the Martello tower. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:32 view
23 A voice Mulligan's, whose voice is "sweettoned": he's able to be "golden-mouthed" or honey-tongued when he wishes Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:02 view
23 Horn of a bull, hoof of a horse, smile of a Saxon. Stephen thinks his own version of a saying for three things a person should never trust. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:35 view
23 A voice, sweettoned and sustained, called to him from the sea. Turning the curve he waved his hand. It called again. Mayn't this be conceived of as the first siren's call heard in Ulysses? Aye, it may. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:19 view
23 Home also I cannot go. Stephen has about had it with Mulligan, and does not feel he could return to the tower to sleep (there is also the problem of no longer having the key); "home", now referring to the place his immediate family lives, is also not an option -- the family has broken up after May's death, and there is possibly some anger there over Stephen's refusal to pray for her. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:33 view
23 Liliata rutilantium.Turma circumdet.Jubilantium te virginum. Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at the deathbed of May, Stephen's mother Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 Home also I cannot go See Ellmann's biography of Joyce for parallels to Joyce's exit from the Martello tower. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:32 view
23 A voice Mulligan's, whose voice is "sweettoned": he's able to be "golden-mouthed" or honey-tongued when he wishes Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:02 view
23 Horn of a bull, hoof of a horse, smile of a Saxon. Stephen thinks his own version of a saying for three things a person should never trust. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:35 view
23 Home We'll glimpse the dire Dedalus home in episode 10 p217 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:53 view
23 Home also I cannot go. Stephen has about had it with Mulligan, and does not feel he could return to the tower to sleep (there is also the problem of no longer having the key); "home", now referring to the place his immediate family lives, is also not an option -- the family has broken up after May's death, and there is possibly some anger there over Stephen's refusal to pray for her. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:33 view
23 Liliata rutilantium.Turma circumdet.Jubilantium te virginum. Part of the Catholic liturgy for the dying, spoken at the deathbed of May, Stephen's mother Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:04 view
23 I will not sleep here tonight. Like Telemachus, Stephen (alternatively Hamlet/Shakespeare/Telemachus) has been thrust from his home and into his quest, thus initiating the dynamic action of the drama; unlike Telemachus, Stephen is not consciously aware that the object of his quest is a father-figure. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:47 view
11 barbacans castle towers (often spelled barbicans) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 I get paid Stephen has regular work teaching at a boy's school, as will be seen in Episode 2 (Nestor); Mulligan, a medical student, seems to get his money from his aunt Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 A server of a servant By serving Mulligan in bringing his shaving bowl, since Mulligan is himself a servant to society's demands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 your symbol of Irish art Mulligan has offered up the "cracked looking glass of a servant" image Stephen created earlier to Haines in hope of cadging a few coins for a drink; he is willing to sell off Stephen's art (and by extension, all Ireland) to the English for gain, if Stephen won't do it himself, but feigns shock when Stephen later facetiously asks Haines if he can make any money off his wit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 barbacans castle towers (often spelled barbicans) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 I get paid Stephen has regular work teaching at a boy's school, as will be seen in Episode 2 (Nestor); Mulligan, a medical student, seems to get his money from his aunt Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
11 grease butter or lard? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:32 view
11 A server of a servant By serving Mulligan in bringing his shaving bowl, since Mulligan is himself a servant to society's demands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 your symbol of Irish art Mulligan has offered up the "cracked looking glass of a servant" image Stephen created earlier to Haines in hope of cadging a few coins for a drink; he is willing to sell off Stephen's art (and by extension, all Ireland) to the English for gain, if Stephen won't do it himself, but feigns shock when Stephen later facetiously asks Haines if he can make any money off his wit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 domed designed to support the weight of a cannon Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:30 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
11 Clongowes A Jesuit boarding school attended by a young Stephen; the scene of Stephen's most devout Catholicism. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
11 A server of a servant By serving Mulligan in bringing his shaving bowl, since Mulligan is himself a servant to society's demands. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 your symbol of Irish art Mulligan has offered up the "cracked looking glass of a servant" image Stephen created earlier to Haines in hope of cadging a few coins for a drink; he is willing to sell off Stephen's art (and by extension, all Ireland) to the English for gain, if Stephen won't do it himself, but feigns shock when Stephen later facetiously asks Haines if he can make any money off his wit Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 O, wont we have a merry time,Drinking whisky, beer and wine,On coronation Coronation day?O, wont we have a merry timeOn coronation day? to the tune of 'O, Dem Golden Slippers' Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:29 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
11 Clongowes A Jesuit boarding school attended by a young Stephen; the scene of Stephen's most devout Catholicism. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
11 barbacans castle towers (often spelled barbicans) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 I get paid Stephen has regular work teaching at a boy's school, as will be seen in Episode 2 (Nestor); Mulligan, a medical student, seems to get his money from his aunt Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:29 view
11 I get paid Unlike Mulligan, Stephen seems reluctant to beg when he has an alternative Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:28 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
11 Clongowes A Jesuit boarding school attended by a young Stephen; the scene of Stephen's most devout Catholicism. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:28 view
11 Cockney accent In "Circe", the King himself (Edward VII) sings this song, presumably without the Cockney accent. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:26 view
11 Janey Mack Mulligan is repeatedly taking pains not to"swear" (by mentioning the name of Jesus) in the presence of Haines. It is more a question of polite manners than avoiding blasphemy, since he is extremely blasphemous throughout the book. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:11 view
14 me she slights Like Stephen's picture of most Irish, the milkwoman is impressed with Anglicized learning but wouldn't be impressed with the works of an Irish artist (such as Stephen hopes to be), even though artistic abilities are closer to Ireland's cultural bequest than scientific ones Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 Do you understand Haines, the English boarder, is trying out his Gaelic on the milkwoman, who not only does not speak Irish but isn't aware that is what he is speaking Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:22 view
14 Silk of the kine and poor old woman epithets for Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
14 ves needs apostrophe Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:59 view
14 confidently he was nervous she might be able to criticize his pronunciation Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:19 view
14 me she slights Like Stephen's picture of most Irish, the milkwoman is impressed with Anglicized learning but wouldn't be impressed with the works of an Irish artist (such as Stephen hopes to be), even though artistic abilities are closer to Ireland's cultural bequest than scientific ones Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 the loud voice Haines tries some of his Irish out on the old woman, who doesn't speak Irish Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
14 To serve or to upbraid Seeing the milkwoman as a mythic Kathleen-Ni-Houlihan figure protecting Ireland, Stephen wonders whether she is there to help him in his fight against British tyranny, or to chasten him for failing Ireland. Though initially soothed by the site of a "real" (i.e. not Anglicized) Irish milkwoman, he quickly sees in her the faults he sees in all the modern Irish: ignorance of national history (she doesn't speak or even recognize Gaelic) and quickness to be impressed with foreign learning and cultivation (e.g. Mulligan's status as a medical student). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 cuckquean a cuckolded woman Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:58 view
14 me she slights Like Stephen's picture of most Irish, the milkwoman is impressed with Anglicized learning but wouldn't be impressed with the works of an Irish artist (such as Stephen hopes to be), even though artistic abilities are closer to Ireland's cultural bequest than scientific ones Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 Is there Gaelic on you One of the examples of Gaelic grammar seeping into English. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:28 view
14 the loud voice Haines tries some of his Irish out on the old woman, who doesn't speak Irish Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
14 maybe a messenger E.g., as Athena was wont to come in disguise to goad mortals into action, as she encouraged Telemachus to depart his home in Ithaca in search of his long-lost father, Odysseus. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:56 view
14 To serve or to upbraid Seeing the milkwoman as a mythic Kathleen-Ni-Houlihan figure protecting Ireland, Stephen wonders whether she is there to help him in his fight against British tyranny, or to chasten him for failing Ireland. Though initially soothed by the site of a "real" (i.e. not Anglicized) Irish milkwoman, he quickly sees in her the faults he sees in all the modern Irish: ignorance of national history (she doesn't speak or even recognize Gaelic) and quickness to be impressed with foreign learning and cultivation (e.g. Mulligan's status as a medical student). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 Silk of the kine like 'cream of the crop' for cattle Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:58 view
14 Do you understand Haines, the English boarder, is trying out his Gaelic on the milkwoman, who not only does not speak Irish but isn't aware that is what he is speaking Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:22 view
14 Silk of the kine and poor old woman epithets for Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
14 the loud voice Haines tries some of his Irish out on the old woman, who doesn't speak Irish Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:21 view
14 maybe a messenger E.g., as Athena was wont to come in disguise to goad mortals into action, as she encouraged Telemachus to depart his home in Ithaca in search of his long-lost father, Odysseus. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:56 view
14 To serve or to upbraid Seeing the milkwoman as a mythic Kathleen-Ni-Houlihan figure protecting Ireland, Stephen wonders whether she is there to help him in his fight against British tyranny, or to chasten him for failing Ireland. Though initially soothed by the site of a "real" (i.e. not Anglicized) Irish milkwoman, he quickly sees in her the faults he sees in all the modern Irish: ignorance of national history (she doesn't speak or even recognize Gaelic) and quickness to be impressed with foreign learning and cultivation (e.g. Mulligan's status as a medical student). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:23 view
14 Do you understand Haines, the English boarder, is trying out his Gaelic on the milkwoman, who not only does not speak Irish but isn't aware that is what he is speaking Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:22 view
14 Silk of the kine and poor old woman epithets for Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
4 prelate Person of high rank and influence within the church, such as a bishop Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
4 saved men from drowning Mulligan's rescue of a drowning man will be discussed later in the novel; for all that Stephen feels morally superior to the British-toadying Mulligan, he recognizes he would not have been brave enough to save the man's life. I believe Mulligan's real-life counter-part Gogarty might have similarly piqued Joyce with heroics, though I need to track down a reference to this. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:42 view
4 Hellenic Related to the ancient Greeks, around the time when their culture and learning most flourished Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 jejune jesuit Mulligan is alliterating as well. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:44 view
4 absurd Why absurd? lewpot 2015-03-05 02:35 view
4 dactyls Words consisting of one long (or accented) syllable followed by two short (or unaccented) syllables, such as MUL-li-gan Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 a black panther Haines' dream foreshadows the arrival of main character Leopold Bloom in the story; Bloom, a Jewish Dubliner, social misfit, and outcast from his own home, is often described as a sort of "dark horse" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 Saxon Antiquated term for an English person (England was populated by Saxons before the William of Normandy introduced the French) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 twenty quid about $2000 today Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:56 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
4 prelate Person of high rank and influence within the church, such as a bishop Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
4 trouser so he's wearing pants Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:27 view
4 Hellenic Related to the ancient Greeks, around the time when their culture and learning most flourished Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 two dactyls. A dactyl is a set of three syllables, where the first one is stressed, and the other two unstressed: MAL-a-chi, MULL-i-gan. 'Century', 'customer', 'devastate' etc are all dactyls: it's a way of describing stress and rhythm in poetry, especially classical verse. HCE 2015-03-09 16:54 view
4 Malachi Mulligan Gogarty commented that Joyce made him into a "stage Irish" as Malachi Mulligan. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:40 view
4 Haines Haines is an Englishman from Oxford who is boarding in the tower with Stephen and Mulligan, apparently with the goal of researching Irish folk tradition. The previous evening he had a nightmare involving shooting a black panther; the dream disturbed Stephen, who feared Haines would try to shoot his gun while half-awake. This story parallels a story from Joyce's own life (see Ellmann's biography of Joyce for details). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 to shave Why does Joyce have Mulligan shave? Mulligan's whiskers begin the pattern of excretions/secretions that will follow: everything the human body can excrete/secrete, will be in Ulysses. wvarga7a1 2015-05-13 22:10 view
4 Your absurd name Stephen's last name, Dedalus, is an unusual name for an Irish person. The name comes from the mythical Greek Daedalus, the great inventor who created the labyrinth for King Minos and escaped from Crete using wings he made from birds' feathers; Daedalus' son, Icarus, was given a similar set of wings for escaping, but flew so near the sun that the wings disintegrated and he drowned. Daedalus is often used as a symbol of the rational, unemotive, scientific mind, while Icarus represents the unrestrained artist; Stephen bears far more resemblance to the latter Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:06 view
4 a black panther Haines' dream foreshadows the arrival of main character Leopold Bloom in the story; Bloom, a Jewish Dubliner, social misfit, and outcast from his own home, is often described as a sort of "dark horse" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 jesuit youthful, lacking knowledge or experience Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
4 prelate Person of high rank and influence within the church, such as a bishop Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:45 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
4 jejune Depending on how we understand 'jejune' couldn't the answer be yes or no? Does he starve himself of experiences, or hunger for them? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:26 view
4 Hellenic Related to the ancient Greeks, around the time when their culture and learning most flourished Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 Haines Haines is an Englishman from Oxford who is boarding in the tower with Stephen and Mulligan, apparently with the goal of researching Irish folk tradition. The previous evening he had a nightmare involving shooting a black panther; the dream disturbed Stephen, who feared Haines would try to shoot his gun while half-awake. This story parallels a story from Joyce's own life (see Ellmann's biography of Joyce for details). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 Your absurd name Stephen's last name, Dedalus, is an unusual name for an Irish person. The name comes from the mythical Greek Daedalus, the great inventor who created the labyrinth for King Minos and escaped from Crete using wings he made from birds' feathers; Daedalus' son, Icarus, was given a similar set of wings for escaping, but flew so near the sun that the wings disintegrated and he drowned. Daedalus is often used as a symbol of the rational, unemotive, scientific mind, while Icarus represents the unrestrained artist; Stephen bears far more resemblance to the latter Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:06 view
4 saved men from drowning Mulligan's rescue of a drowning man will be discussed later in the novel; for all that Stephen feels morally superior to the British-toadying Mulligan, he recognizes he would not have been brave enough to save the man's life. I believe Mulligan's real-life counter-part Gogarty might have similarly piqued Joyce with heroics, though I need to track down a reference to this. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:42 view
4 jesuit youthful, lacking knowledge or experience Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 a black panther I don't see how "dark horse" maps onto "black panther." nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:26 view
4 dactyls Words consisting of one long (or accented) syllable followed by two short (or unaccented) syllables, such as MUL-li-gan Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 Haines Haines is an Englishman from Oxford who is boarding in the tower with Stephen and Mulligan, apparently with the goal of researching Irish folk tradition. The previous evening he had a nightmare involving shooting a black panther; the dream disturbed Stephen, who feared Haines would try to shoot his gun while half-awake. This story parallels a story from Joyce's own life (see Ellmann's biography of Joyce for details). Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 Saxon Antiquated term for an English person (England was populated by Saxons before the William of Normandy introduced the French) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 Your absurd name Stephen's last name, Dedalus, is an unusual name for an Irish person. The name comes from the mythical Greek Daedalus, the great inventor who created the labyrinth for King Minos and escaped from Crete using wings he made from birds' feathers; Daedalus' son, Icarus, was given a similar set of wings for escaping, but flew so near the sun that the wings disintegrated and he drowned. Daedalus is often used as a symbol of the rational, unemotive, scientific mind, while Icarus represents the unrestrained artist; Stephen bears far more resemblance to the latter Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:06 view
4 saved men from drowning Mulligan's rescue of a drowning man will be discussed later in the novel; for all that Stephen feels morally superior to the British-toadying Mulligan, he recognizes he would not have been brave enough to save the man's life. I believe Mulligan's real-life counter-part Gogarty might have similarly piqued Joyce with heroics, though I need to track down a reference to this. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:42 view
4 jesuit youthful, lacking knowledge or experience Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 a black panther I don't see how "dark horse" maps onto "black panther." nfraistat 2015-02-05 15:26 view
4 dactyls Words consisting of one long (or accented) syllable followed by two short (or unaccented) syllables, such as MUL-li-gan Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
4 a black panther Haines' dream foreshadows the arrival of main character Leopold Bloom in the story; Bloom, a Jewish Dubliner, social misfit, and outcast from his own home, is often described as a sort of "dark horse" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:43 view
4 Saxon Antiquated term for an English person (England was populated by Saxons before the William of Normandy introduced the French) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-01 12:07 view
20 It seems history is to blame. Haines' and Stephen's views of history are vastly different. See also the divergent philosophies of history spelled out in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:16 view
20 familiar a witch's animal companion Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 We feel in England Haines believes that English have historically treated the Irish wrongly, but is blind to the current effect Britain has on Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 He wants that key The tower has only one key, which Stephen has kept so far (with his regular teaching job, he has been the one to pay the rent). He senses now the Mulligan will ask for the key, effectively usurping his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 brazen Of bronze and insolent. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:23 view
20 They Haines and Mulligan on their way home Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 the servant of two masters the English master is England's pernicious influence on Ireland ("The imperial British state"); the Italian master is the Catholic Church and Pope, jealous of modern independent thought, demanding "kneel down before me" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:13 view
20 the mass for pope Marcellus, a musical composition by Palestrina, a favorite of Joyce's Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:25 view
20 It seems history is to blame. Haines' and Stephen's views of history are vastly different. See also the divergent philosophies of history spelled out in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:16 view
20 We feel in England Haines believes that English have historically treated the Irish wrongly, but is blind to the current effect Britain has on Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 ferrule a protective cap around the end of Stephen's walking stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 brazen Of bronze and insolent. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:23 view
20 They Haines and Mulligan on their way home Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 the servant of two masters the English master is England's pernicious influence on Ireland ("The imperial British state"); the Italian master is the Catholic Church and Pope, jealous of modern independent thought, demanding "kneel down before me" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:13 view
20 et unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam: SD has just spoken the English translation: "the holy Roman catholic and apostolic church" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:24 view
20 et unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam Latin: "The one, holy, universal and apostolic Church" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 ferrule a protective cap around the end of Stephen's walking stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 It is mine, I paid the rent. One of the tricky points. The common interpretation is Stephen paid the rent to the tower, and Mulligan is "usurping" the tower from him by taking the key. In real life, it was Gogarty who paid the rent; perhaps Joyce was taking some kind of revenge by reversing the situation. An alternative explanation is that it is Mulligan who paid the rent, and what we read here is Mulligan's voice ringing in Stephen's mind. This would square better with the real-life situation, and the later revelation of Stephen's debt of nine pounds (more than twice his salary) to Mulligan. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:30 view
20 grim displeasure Stephen's displeasure may be caused both by memory of his refusal to pray with his dying mother, and by the failure of his free-willed self to be as successful as those who serve other masters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
20 familiar a witch's animal companion Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 the servant of two masters the English master is England's pernicious influence on Ireland ("The imperial British state"); the Italian master is the Catholic Church and Pope, jealous of modern independent thought, demanding "kneel down before me" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:13 view
20 He wants that key The tower has only one key, which Stephen has kept so far (with his regular teaching job, he has been the one to pay the rent). He senses now the Mulligan will ask for the key, effectively usurping his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 I paid the rent. if SD (unlike JAJ) has been gainfully employed for three payperiods at 4 pounds per, maybe SD did pay. but the inner voice doesn't sound like him at all-- he's not acquisitive or possessive. Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:23 view
20 et unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam Latin: "The one, holy, universal and apostolic Church" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 ferrule a protective cap around the end of Stephen's walking stick Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 grim displeasure Stephen's displeasure may be caused both by memory of his refusal to pray with his dying mother, and by the failure of his free-willed self to be as successful as those who serve other masters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
20 familiar a witch's animal companion Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 We feel in England Haines believes that English have historically treated the Irish wrongly, but is blind to the current effect Britain has on Ireland Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 He wants that key The tower has only one key, which Stephen has kept so far (with his regular teaching job, he has been the one to pay the rent). He senses now the Mulligan will ask for the key, effectively usurping his home. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 et unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam Latin: "The one, holy, universal and apostolic Church" Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:12 view
20 They Haines and Mulligan on their way home Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 22:46 view
20 grim displeasure Stephen's displeasure may be caused both by memory of his refusal to pray with his dying mother, and by the failure of his free-willed self to be as successful as those who serve other masters Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:15 view
8 jesuit strain Stephen retains the Jesuit love of logic and reason without the accompanying religion or affection Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 hired mute a person hired to appear as a mourner at a funeral (Lalouette's is assumedly a funeral parlor) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
8 the Mater and Richmond Irish hospitals (Mulligan is a medical student) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 Her cerebral lobes are not functioning Mulligan imagines an old woman gradually losing her mental abilities, trying to show Stephen that one should humor the dying. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 You said a rare use of italics for direct quotation Tim Finnegan 2015-11-25 03:30 view
8 hired mute a person hired to appear as a mourner at a funeral (Lalouette's is assumedly a funeral parlor) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
8 the Mater and Richmond Irish hospitals (Mulligan is a medical student) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 Her cerebral lobes are not functioning Mulligan imagines an old woman gradually losing her mental abilities, trying to show Stephen that one should humor the dying. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 only is it possible SD is offended by the dismissive word "only"? Gogarty accepting his mother's rejection of Stephen? Tim Finnegan 2015-11-25 03:28 view
8 Yes Mulligan is fearless, anyway Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:39 view
8 jesuit strain Stephen retains the Jesuit love of logic and reason without the accompanying religion or affection Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 Humour her Stephen considered this betraying his art Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:57 view
8 Her cerebral lobes are not functioning Mulligan imagines an old woman gradually losing her mental abilities, trying to show Stephen that one should humor the dying. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 jesuit strain Stephen retains the Jesuit love of logic and reason without the accompanying religion or affection Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
8 hired mute a person hired to appear as a mourner at a funeral (Lalouette's is assumedly a funeral parlor) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:33 view
8 the Mater and Richmond Irish hospitals (Mulligan is a medical student) Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:34 view
13 entering has Haines signalled her to come in, or did the open door suffice? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:29 view
13 He watched her pour Stephen sees the "uncivilized" milkwoman as personifying the Irish spirit, her very oldness and lack of breeding suggesting she is a "messenger" or otherwise supernatural Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
13 Mabinogion The Mabinogion is a collection of old Welsh stories Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 the Upanishads The Upanishads are Hindu writings Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
13 He watched her pour Stephen sees the "uncivilized" milkwoman as personifying the Irish spirit, her very oldness and lack of breeding suggesting she is a "messenger" or otherwise supernatural Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
13 prepuces. pronounced PREP-yooces (cf puce gloves) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:24 view
13 Mabinogion The Mabinogion is a collection of old Welsh stories Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
13 collector of prepuces Mulligan continues to speak in an elevated anthropological style, mocking the milkwoman's simplicity and religion. Collector of prepuces: A reference to the Old Testament God's law that Jewish men be circumcised. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
13 That's folk Haines is apparently in Ireland to collect folk tales or culture for a book. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 He watched her pour Stephen sees the "uncivilized" milkwoman as personifying the Irish spirit, her very oldness and lack of breeding suggesting she is a "messenger" or otherwise supernatural Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:24 view
13 Five lines of text and ten pages of notes Joyce very self-consciously packed every sentence with nuances that would require explication, but even Finnegans Wake seems to require less than one page per line Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:21 view
13 Mabinogion The Mabinogion is a collection of old Welsh stories Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
13 collector of prepuces Mulligan continues to speak in an elevated anthropological style, mocking the milkwoman's simplicity and religion. Collector of prepuces: A reference to the Old Testament God's law that Jewish men be circumcised. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
13 That's folk Haines is apparently in Ireland to collect folk tales or culture for a book. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 collector I interpret the sense of "collector" as the "tax collector" here - the Jewish god demands payment of prepuces. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:27 view
13 the Upanishads The Upanishads are Hindu writings Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
13 collector of prepuces Mulligan continues to speak in an elevated anthropological style, mocking the milkwoman's simplicity and religion. Collector of prepuces: A reference to the Old Testament God's law that Jewish men be circumcised. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
13 That's folk Haines is apparently in Ireland to collect folk tales or culture for a book. Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:26 view
13 But, hising up her petticoats.. The final line would have been "She pisses like a man" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:56 view
13 the Upanishads The Upanishads are Hindu writings Amanda Visconti 2015-01-31 23:25 view
37 nacheinander. German for "in succession" KC 2015-03-08 19:47 view
37 nacheinander Nacheinander is associated with the sequentiality of time, while nebeneiander is associated with parallel paths through space; furthermore, Stephen associates time with hearing, because we hear one sound after another, and space with seeing, because we see in many directions at once. Working out these associations is one of the keys to unlocking Proteus. See also A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, p 212. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:13 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:131), meaning “master of those that know.” KC 2015-03-08 11:38 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
37 Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. Here Stephen is contemplating Aristotle's theory of light and colour, which is found in two of Aristotle's works: On the Soul and Sense and Sensibilia. KC 2015-03-08 19:45 view
37 nacheinander Nacheinander is associated with the sequentiality of time, while nebeneiander is associated with parallel paths through space; furthermore, Stephen associates time with hearing, because we hear one sound after another, and space with seeing, because we see in many directions at once. Working out these associations is one of the keys to unlocking Proteus. See also A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, p 212. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:13 view
37 iambs Stephen has made a mistake. The syllables are trochees (stressed syllable, unstressed syllable), not iambs (unstressed syllable, stressed syllable, made famous by Shakespearean verse). Despite his intellectualism, Stephen DOES make mistakes Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 21:29 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:131), meaning “master of those that know.” KC 2015-03-08 11:38 view
37 nebeneinander German for "side-by-side" KC 2015-03-08 19:48 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
37 Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. Here Stephen is contemplating Aristotle's theory of light and colour, which is found in two of Aristotle's works: On the Soul and Sense and Sensibilia. KC 2015-03-08 19:45 view
37 If I fell over a cliff that beetles o'er his base Shakespeare, with allusion to both Hamlet and King Lear. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:06 view
37 Signatures of all things I am here to read Jakob Boehme: http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sat/index.htm bbogle 2015-05-20 23:07 view
37 Ineluctable also available here in comic form: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/proteus-comic Tim Finnegan 2015-08-01 06:28 view
37 iambs marching Martial poetic feet: feet marching. See also Joyce's essay on James Clarence Mangan; search on the page for the word iambs. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:35 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
37 nebeneinander German for "side-by-side" KC 2015-03-08 19:48 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:130-131), meaning “master of those that know.” "Vidi il Maestro di color che sanno | Seder tra filosofica famiglia" - "I saw the master of those that know, | seated amid the philosophic family" Dante frequently acknowledges his debt to Aristotle whom he calls Maestro / Master and from whose writings and teachings Dante has based much of his works on. http://goo.gl/tGq4OB It is said that the play on the Italian use of ‘color’ and the English ‘colour’, is a connection that Joyce intended. KC 2015-03-08 11:58 view
37 If I fell over a cliff that beetles o'er his base Shakespeare, with allusion to both Hamlet and King Lear. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:06 view
37 Signatures of all things I am here to read Jakob Boehme: http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sat/index.htm bbogle 2015-05-20 23:07 view
37 iambs marching Martial poetic feet: feet marching. See also Joyce's essay on James Clarence Mangan; search on the page for the word iambs. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:35 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
37 nacheinander. German for "in succession" KC 2015-03-08 19:47 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:130-131), meaning “master of those that know.” "Vidi il Maestro di color che sanno | Seder tra filosofica famiglia" - "I saw the master of those that know, | seated amid the philosophic family" Dante frequently acknowledges his debt to Aristotle whom he calls Maestro / Master and from whose writings and teachings Dante has based much of his works on. http://goo.gl/tGq4OB It is said that the play on the Italian use of ‘color’ and the English ‘colour’, is a connection that Joyce intended. KC 2015-03-08 11:58 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
38 the liberties A slum south of the Liffey, associated for both Stephen and Bloom with prostitution Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:20 view
38 the steps from Leahy's terrace We know exactly where these were, one of the very few fixed landmarks in the episode. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:18 view
38 hushed in ruddy wool Molly knit a woolen jacket or sweater in which Rudy was buried. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:27 view
38 Hello. Kinch here. Put me on to Edenville. Aleph, alpha: nought, nought, one. Here Stephen is comparing the umbilical cord to telephone lines. He imitates a phone call to Adam and Eve in the biblical Eden, demonstrating both the interconnected nature of human existence (paralleling how all humans are derived from Adam and Eve with the contemporary connections made through the telephone) and the extent of Stephen's creative imagination. indigoecho 2015-03-27 06:25 view
38 hushed in ruddy wool Molly knit a woolen jacket or sweater in which Rudy was buried. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:27 view
38 Am I going to Aunt Sara's or not? A mysterious clue correlated somehow to a sighting near the start of episode six Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:23 view
39 Requiescat Here is a link to Wilde's poem: http://www.poetry-archive.com/w/requiescat.html serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:45 view
39 coign of vantage From the Scottish play, description of the castle at Inverness. The birds love it. "Coign" = corner; viz., a useful corner. http://shakespeare.mit.edu/macbeth/macbeth.1.6.html bbogle 2015-05-29 09:22 view
39 coign of vantage From the Scottish play, description of the castle at Inverness. The birds love it. "Coign" = corner; viz., a useful corner. http://shakespeare.mit.edu/macbeth/macbeth.1.6.html bbogle 2015-05-29 09:22 view
39 Duces Tecum Latin for "To bring with you" Modern day subpoena for evidence serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:52 view
40 what else were they invented for? Biologically, it's more accurate to say women invented men for sex Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:28 view
40 Descende, calve, ut ne nimium decalveris. Latin for "Come down, thou bald head, they should not be too much hair was cut off" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:34 view
41 Il croit French for "He believes" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:11 view
41 Qui vous a mis dans cette fichue position French for "Who put you in this damn position" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:04 view
41 C'est tordant, vous savez. Moi je suis socialiste. Je ne crois pas en l'exis-tence de Dieu. Faut pas le dire à mon père French for "It's twisting , you know. I am a socialist . I do not believe in the existence of God. Must not tell my father" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:10 view
41 physiques, chimiques et naturelles French for "Physical, Chemical and Natural" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:13 view
41 mahamanvantara Sanskrit- used in Hinduism to denote a long period of time serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:42 view
41 gros lots French for "Jackpot" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:08 view
41 Ring-send A village he may be walking towards Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:31 view
41 mou en civet French for "Lung Soup" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:54 view
41 Schluss French for "conclusion" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:12 view
41 mahamanvantara Helena Blavatsky "The Key to Theosophy": The great interludes between the Manus, the period of universal activity. Manvantara here implies simply a period of activity, as opposed to praylaya or rest, without reference to the length of the cycle. serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:42 view
41 lait chaud French for "Hot Milk" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:08 view
41 lapin French for "bunny" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:53 view
41 Mon père, oui My father, yes. serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:11 view
41 C'est le pigeon French for "This is the pigeon" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:05 view
42 Encore deux minutes French for "another two minutes" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:55 view
42 their mouths yellowed An echo of the Chrysostomos material of Telemachus. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:31 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Any guesses what this was for? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:34 view
42 Fermé French for "closed" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:55 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Vinegar is a dilution of acetic acid, if that helps. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:26 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Vinegar is a dilution of acetic acid, if that helps. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:26 view
42 chaussons French for "slippers" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:56 view
42 1904 Joyce changed this from 1902, though factually it could only have been 1903 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 04:16 view
42 Mother Later editions correct "Mother dying" to "Nother dyng" hence being a "curiosity." See Ellmann in NYT: https://goo.gl/b2TFtd wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 14:28 view
42 Pantalon Blanc et Culotte Rouge French for "White Pants and Red Panties" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:56 view
42 their mouths yellowed An echo of the Chrysostomos material of Telemachus. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:31 view
43 froeken, bonne à tout faire Froeken- Danish for "miss" bonne a tout faire- French for "good all" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:32 view
43 Il est Irlandais. Hollandais? Non fromage. Deux Irlandais, nous, Irlande, vous savez? Ah, oui! French for "Is it Irish. Dutch? Not cheese. Two irishmen, we, Ireland, you know? Ah yes!" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:27 view
43 La Patrie French for "the homeland" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:30 view
43 Shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-05-28 09:42 view
43 Moi faire, she said. Tous les messieurs French for "I do" she said "All gentlemen" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:58 view
43 dents jaunes. French for "Yellow Teeth" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:29 view
43 Shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-05-28 09:42 view
43 Vieille ogresse French for "Old Ogress" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:29 view
43 slainte Drinking Toast serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:28 view
44 A bloated carcase of a dog "Dogsbody" physicalized. bbogle 2015-05-20 22:47 view
44 A bloated carcase of a dog "Dogsbody" physicalized. bbogle 2015-05-20 22:47 view
45 dog Enter the protean dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:11 view
45 dog Enter the protean dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:11 view
46 bearish No,'tis like unto a bear. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:18 view
46 vulturing Or a vulture. In any event, quite mutable, this dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:26 view
46 calf Somewhat bovine as well. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 a buck Or no; how like unto a buck. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:17 view
46 vulturing Or a vulture. In any event, quite mutable, this dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:26 view
46 wolf Or mayhap a wolf... bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 a buck Or no; how like unto a buck. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:17 view
46 panther Very much like a panther. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:25 view
46 wolf Or mayhap a wolf... bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 like a bounding hare How like a hare this dog has become. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:16 view
46 panther Very much like a panther. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:25 view
46 bearish No,'tis like unto a bear. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:18 view
46 like a bounding hare How like a hare this dog has become. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:16 view
46 calf Somewhat bovine as well. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
47 trudges, schlepps, trains, drags, trascines Searching for the best synonym Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:42 view
48 O, touch me soon, now. See also Hades, when Bloom recalls probable occasion of conception of Rudy. http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/86 bbogle 2015-03-23 18:43 view
48 O, touch me soon, now. See also Hades, when Bloom recalls probable occasion of conception of Rudy. http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/86 bbogle 2015-03-23 18:43 view
48 That's twice I forgot to take slips from the library counter. As Leopold Bloom forgets his key. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:33 view
48 What she? He's choosing a female to fantasize about Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:46 view
48 That's twice I forgot to take slips from the library counter. As Leopold Bloom forgets his key. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:33 view
49 diebus ac noctibus iniurias patiens ingemiscit Latin for "All creation (sc. omnis creatura) groans enduring hardships days and nights". From St. Ambrose's commentary on St. Paul's Letter to the Romans, on verse 8:22 ("scimus enim quod omnis creatura ingemescit et parturit usque adhuc"). diyclassics 2015-02-17 18:40 view
49 diebus ac noctibus iniurias patiens ingemiscit Latin for "All creation (sc. omnis creatura) groans enduring hardships days and nights". From St. Ambrose's commentary on St. Paul's Letter to the Romans, on verse 8:22 ("scimus enim quod omnis creatura ingemescit et parturit usque adhuc"). diyclassics 2015-02-17 18:40 view
50 Shells Comparing his teeth to shells connects them to the many other mentions of shells in this episode, affiliated with the seaside as well as to Deasy's preoccupation with money in Nestor. bbogle 2015-05-20 23:15 view
50 My teeth are very bad. Why, I wonder? Feel. That one is going too. Shells. After all that business about chrysostomos in Telemachus it's only now, in the third episode, that we discover that Joyce (and Stephen) was setting up this dichotomy; that is, it is in part because of Stephen's bad teeth that he was sensitive to Buck's golden teeth, even, white and glittering. Stephen was not only describing but contrasting, presumably reflecting on the injustice of the situation. Thus at this line about Stephen's teeth, so far removed from the original observation, we suddenly have a new interpretation, or way of understanding, what had been informing Stephen's thoughts much earlier. How we understood at least one part of Telemachus is subtly altered. Of course by widely distributing meanings and interpretations throughout the entire text of Ulysses Joyce insures that our understanding of the whole is constantly being challenged. This technique makes the book more life-like and keeps us coming back to it as we slowly fall under, and eventually fully succumb to, the spell which Joyce weaves. bbogle 2015-04-27 21:20 view
50 Shells Comparing his teeth to shells connects them to the many other mentions of shells in this episode, affiliated with the seaside as well as to Deasy's preoccupation with money in Nestor. bbogle 2015-05-20 23:15 view
50 Moving through the air high spars of a threemaster, her sails brailed up on the crosstrees, homing, upstream, silently moving, a silent ship. Joyce revisits the crosstrees in Stephen's internal mocking of the Apostles' Creed in Scylla and Charybdis (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/189), and this silent ship, the threemaster Rosevean from Bridgwater with bricks, is mentioned at various times as well, including in Eumaeus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/580). bbogle 2015-03-23 19:09 view
50 My teeth are very bad. Why, I wonder? Feel. That one is going too. Shells. After all that business about chrysostomos in Telemachus it's only now, in the third episode, that we discover that Joyce (and Stephen) was setting up this dichotomy; that is, it is in part because of Stephen's bad teeth that he was sensitive to Buck's golden teeth, even, white and glittering. Stephen was not only describing but contrasting, presumably reflecting on the injustice of the situation. Thus at this line about Stephen's teeth, so far removed from the original observation, we suddenly have a new interpretation, or way of understanding, what had been informing Stephen's thoughts much earlier. How we understood at least one part of Telemachus is subtly altered. Of course by widely distributing meanings and interpretations throughout the entire text of Ulysses Joyce insures that our understanding of the whole is constantly being challenged. This technique makes the book more life-like and keeps us coming back to it as we slowly fall under, and eventually fully succumb to, the spell which Joyce weaves. bbogle 2015-04-27 21:20 view
50 Moving through the air high spars of a threemaster, her sails brailed up on the crosstrees, homing, upstream, silently moving, a silent ship. Joyce revisits the crosstrees in Stephen's internal mocking of the Apostles' Creed in Scylla and Charybdis (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/189), and this silent ship, the threemaster Rosevean from Bridgwater with bricks, is mentioned at various times as well, including in Eumaeus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/580). bbogle 2015-03-23 19:09 view
53 : Note how marked colonicity informs this episode. bbogle 2015-03-24 16:10 view
53 with relish With zest, or the condiment? bbogle 2015-03-24 14:30 view
53 my There are many deliberate ambivalences in this chapter. This 'my' could be Bloom thinking or even an intromission by Joyce. Later, 'she' might refer to either Molly or the cat. Molly is both Calypso and Penelope. Unlike Stephen who insists on 'only one sense of the word', Bloom is associated with many senses. pbohan 2015-03-30 15:04 view
53 tower Paralleling episode one Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:36 view
53 : Note how marked colonicity informs this episode. bbogle 2015-03-24 16:10 view
53 with relish With zest, or the condiment? bbogle 2015-03-24 14:30 view
53 The cat Never named Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:35 view
53 : Excessive colons. I really think that Joyce is playing on the idea of the body's colon as well as the grammatical function, especially considering what happens at the end of this episode. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:38 view
53 writingtable In episode 17 (p662ff) we'll see Bloom writing at a table with two drawers in the center of the livingroom, but that seems like the place for their dining table, not his writingtable. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:02 view
53 Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liver slices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencods’ roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine. Compare the way Joyce introduces Stephen to the way he introduces Bloom. Stephen is a mind, Bloom is a body. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:31 view
53 Wonder what I look like to her. Bloom shows vast empathy Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:37 view
53 O Contrast Bloom's "O" with Molly's first syllable to come. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 18:06 view
54 Curious mice never squeal. Seem to like it. Bloom/Joyce's masochism as natural law? Cf Christian martyrs?? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-28 04:13 view
54 Tweedy Penelope's father was Icarius, Calypso's was probably Atlas Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:47 view
54 Curious mice never squeal. Seem to like it. Curious THAT mice never squeal. Displays the patterns that Bloom's thoughts begin to take. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:49 view
54 the loose brass quoits of the bedstead jingled Repeating motif, foreshadows the coming adultery Manek 2015-04-05 21:17 view
54 Still perhaps : once in a way. A difficult sentence Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:42 view
54 milkman There's no need for a "milkman" to come to 7 Eccles Street as there was for a "milkwoman" to come to the Martello Tower in the Telemachus episode. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 14:47 view
54 green stones Where have I seen this before? http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/19 bbogle 2015-05-15 08:15 view
54 milkman It seems likelier the milkman visited before the episode starts, than that Bloom has already ventured out once to Hanlon's shop. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:40 view
54 green stones Where have I seen this before? http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/19 bbogle 2015-05-15 08:15 view
55 felt in his hip pocket for the latchkey Missing key