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    Annotation author: skelley
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    Quote: 
    bearing a bowl
    Text: 
    The bowl symbolises the chalice used in mass; introduces the "mockery of the mass" motif that will be present throughout the episode (and the book.)
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    Annotation author: Amanda Visconti
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    Quote: 
    Introibo ad altare Dei
    Text: 
    A line spoken by a priest during a Latin Catholic mass, meaning "I will go to the altar of God".
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    Annotation author: Tim Finnegan
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    Quote: 
    Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.
    Text: 
    i'd suggest that if you believe joyce counted the words in sentences you can compile a table of all the sentence lengths and see if the patterns hold globally.
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    Quote: 
    Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed.
    Text: 
    Speculation: The first sentence of Ulysses contains 22 words; could this be a reference to the number 22 in patristic and English religious literature? Kate Gartner Frost has argued that 22 was often a structural element in prefaces of some seventeenth-century English religious writers (John Donne, Giles Fletcher), since it was the number of letters in the Hebrew alphabet, and the number of books of the Old Testament in Jerome’s Latin Vulgate edition.