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    Annotation author: Armagan Ekici
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    Quote: 
    fearful
    Text: 
    "fearful": Gifford reads this as "frightening" (people, including Mulligan, were afraid of the erudition of Jesuits), Thornton as "afraid" (with reference to Romeo and Juliet:``Romeo, come forth, come forth thou fearful man"). `"Afraid" is more in the spirit of other lines of Mulligan. Yet, in the French translation approved by Joyce it is "abominable" and it is unlikely that Joyce would miss something like that in the first page. Perhaps the double meaning was intentional.
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    Annotation author: HCE
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    Quote: 
    Two strong shrill whistles answered through the calm.
    Text: 
    Who is whistling back here?
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    Annotation author: laurapavlo
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    Quote: 
    the dark winding stairs
    Text: 
    Takes place at the Martello tower in Sandycove (outside of Dublin). Joyce briefly lived there with a friend, medical student Oliver St. John Gogarty) after whom Mulligan is modeled. In Dublin's Temple Bar district, there is a pub called the Oliver St. John Gogarty, and a statue of Joyce and Gogarty is outside of it commemorating their relationship. This particular stairway in the tower is an extremely narrow, dark, spiral staircase, that leads to the top of the tower. The view from the top overlooks the coastline and the town of Sandycove with Dublin in the distance. Martello towers were used for spotting incoming attacks; there are about 50 along Ireland's coast, many of which are used as locations in works of fiction. The Sandycove tower is now a museum called the James Joyce Tower.
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    Annotation author: Armagan Ekici
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    Quote: 
    Thanks, old chap, he cried briskly. That will do nicely. Switch off the current, will you?
    Text: 
    Jorn Barger's interpretation: Mulligan is thanking God ("old chap") for the miracle of the shrill whistles answering from nowhere just in time for his Mass parody.