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Page of Ulysses Annotated Quote Text Name Post date Link
34 A woman too brought Parnell low This refers to Irish-nationalist Charles Stewart Parnell's affair with Katherine O'Shea, wife of Captain William O'Shea, an Irish soldier and Member of Parliament. Captain O'Shea had not divorced his wife because she was expecting a large inheritance. When Captain O'Shea finally filed for divorce in 1889, the ensuing trial revealed the affair and the fact that Parnell had fathered three of Katherine's children. The divorce scandal severely damaged Parnell's reputation and caused the Catholic church to condemn his immorality. Heather Munro P... 2016-06-06 10:01 view
43 Moi faire, she said. Tous les messieurs French for "I do" she said "All gentlemen" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:58 view
42 chaussons French for "slippers" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:56 view
42 Pantalon Blanc et Culotte Rouge French for "White Pants and Red Panties" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:56 view
42 Encore deux minutes French for "another two minutes" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:55 view
42 Fermé French for "closed" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:55 view
41 mou en civet French for "Lung Soup" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:54 view
41 lapin French for "bunny" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:53 view
39 Duces Tecum Latin for "To bring with you" Modern day subpoena for evidence serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:52 view
39 Requiescat Here is a link to Wilde's poem: http://www.poetry-archive.com/w/requiescat.html serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:45 view
41 mahamanvantara Sanskrit- used in Hinduism to denote a long period of time serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:42 view
41 mahamanvantara Helena Blavatsky "The Key to Theosophy": The great interludes between the Manus, the period of universal activity. Manvantara here implies simply a period of activity, as opposed to praylaya or rest, without reference to the length of the cycle. serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:42 view
40 Descende, calve, ut ne nimium decalveris. Latin for "Come down, thou bald head, they should not be too much hair was cut off" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:34 view
43 froeken, bonne à tout faire Froeken- Danish for "miss" bonne a tout faire- French for "good all" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:32 view
43 La Patrie French for "the homeland" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:30 view
43 dents jaunes. French for "Yellow Teeth" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:29 view
43 Vieille ogresse French for "Old Ogress" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:29 view
43 slainte Drinking Toast serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:28 view
43 Il est Irlandais. Hollandais? Non fromage. Deux Irlandais, nous, Irlande, vous savez? Ah, oui! French for "Is it Irish. Dutch? Not cheese. Two irishmen, we, Ireland, you know? Ah yes!" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:27 view
41 physiques, chimiques et naturelles French for "Physical, Chemical and Natural" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:13 view
41 Schluss French for "conclusion" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:12 view
41 Mon père, oui My father, yes. serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:11 view
41 Il croit French for "He believes" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:11 view
41 C'est tordant, vous savez. Moi je suis socialiste. Je ne crois pas en l'exis-tence de Dieu. Faut pas le dire à mon père French for "It's twisting , you know. I am a socialist . I do not believe in the existence of God. Must not tell my father" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:10 view
41 gros lots French for "Jackpot" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:08 view
41 lait chaud French for "Hot Milk" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:08 view
41 C'est le pigeon French for "This is the pigeon" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:05 view
41 Qui vous a mis dans cette fichue position French for "Who put you in this damn position" serinamarie89 2016-05-10 15:04 view
54 Curious mice never squeal. Seem to like it. Curious THAT mice never squeal. Displays the patterns that Bloom's thoughts begin to take. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:49 view
53 : Excessive colons. I really think that Joyce is playing on the idea of the body's colon as well as the grammatical function, especially considering what happens at the end of this episode. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:38 view
53 Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish the inner organs of beasts and fowls. He liked thick giblet soup, nutty gizzards, a stuffed roast heart, liver slices fried with crustcrumbs, fried hencods’ roes. Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine. Compare the way Joyce introduces Stephen to the way he introduces Bloom. Stephen is a mind, Bloom is a body. hannahlynmussey 2016-05-01 14:31 view
577 portion apparently the narrator's 'typo', not joyce's Tim Finnegan 2016-01-26 13:29 view
586 the figure 16 Supposedly this is some sort of sexual code, maybe gay, but I can't find any support online Tim Finnegan 2016-01-26 04:07 view
617 cases of which Josie and Molly towards Poldy's social graces (not singing, as here falsely implied) Tim Finnegan 2016-01-25 04:16 view
297 someone The 'someone' is Bloom. pbohan 2016-01-24 04:48 view
7 if you and I could only work together we might do something for the island. Hellenise it Joyce's strategy-- eventually effective I think-- was to reflect back a shocking, liberating uncensored portrait of Gogarty among the rest Tim Finnegan 2016-01-20 04:04 view
268 Bore this Bloom mentions boredom on p58 and p81 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-26 04:37 view
249 Married to Bloom, to greaseaseabloom Joyce's intentional misdirection (via an anonymous narrative voice) for careless readers-- they're talking about an old fogey in Boyd's, not Bloom. Tim Finnegan 2015-12-26 04:22 view
196 I think you’re getting on very nicely. echoes p37 "getting on nicely in the dark" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-26 03:02 view
364 next year in Next year in Jerusalem cf p118? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 05:12 view
364 AM. A. like "U P up" there's an ambiguity between "I AM A..." and "I A..." Possibilities include 'I am a naughty boy' or 'I am a cad' or 'I am sorry' Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 05:11 view
419 THE SOAP Joyce's 1908 notebook speaks of "the naturalism of the Celtic mind" eg "Gogarty: He addresses lifeless objects and hits them smartly with his cane" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 04:31 view
481 injection mark is Zoe a heroin addict??? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 04:19 view
512 mammamufflered does this imply Bloom's mother was still living in 1882? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 04:11 view
574 halfcrowns 2s 6p, also Bloom's gift to Martha on p268 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 04:01 view
599 crosstempered echoing father Simon? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 03:28 view
657 Bernard Corrigan identified on p602 as Dignam's brother-in-law but unmentioned in ch6, coincidentally sharing a name with Molly's childhood priest on pp683 and 693 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 03:17 view
662 1822 in 1822 Bloom's father was about 10yo in Hungary Tim Finnegan 2015-12-24 03:01 view
9 twining entwining, pronounced with long i Tim Finnegan 2015-12-23 02:57 view
23 Home We'll glimpse the dire Dedalus home in episode 10 p217 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:53 view
22 creek just a narrowing inlet? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:49 view
21 Brief hinting of underwear? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:45 view
21 Here I am. Like mother May, dead/absent Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:44 view
21 businessman what sort of businessman? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:29 view
21 Hear, hear. Prolonged applause is this SD's sleepy brain finally awaking for the day? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:28 view
20 the mass for pope Marcellus, a musical composition by Palestrina, a favorite of Joyce's Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:25 view
20 et unam sanctam catholicam et apostolicam ecclesiam: SD has just spoken the English translation: "the holy Roman catholic and apostolic church" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:24 view
20 I paid the rent. if SD (unlike JAJ) has been gainfully employed for three payperiods at 4 pounds per, maybe SD did pay. but the inner voice doesn't sound like him at all-- he's not acquisitive or possessive. Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:23 view
19 Three times a day, after meals if taken literally, this would imply SD and BM have been dining together consistently, without Haines Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:19 view
18 southward actually NW to SE, joyce's mental compass is skewy Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:16 view
18 saw his own image what's going on here? SD notices BM noticing SD's resemblance to Hamlet? BM can't bring himself to tease SD more? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:09 view
18 pique peaks... pique Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:06 view
17 Agenbite of inwit. typo in 1st edition, deleted Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:05 view
15 Ask nothing more of me, sweet. All I can give you I give. these are the opening lines of the song that continues below Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 05:02 view
14 ves needs apostrophe Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:59 view
14 cuckquean a cuckolded woman Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:58 view
14 Silk of the kine like 'cream of the crop' for cattle Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:58 view
13 But, hising up her petticoats.. The final line would have been "She pisses like a man" Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:56 view
10 us So Mulligan was woken, too Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:52 view
10 I am the boyThat can enjoyIn align stanza Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:51 view
10 birdcage Alderman Hooper gave the Blooms a stuffed owl as a wedding present, see p109 and 660 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:50 view
10 a gaud of amber beads Bloom gave Milly an amberoid necklace, see p60 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:48 view
9 White breast of the dim sea a further quote from the yeats lyric Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:45 view
9 And no more If Mulligan is specifically making fun of Stephen's emotions around his mother's death by singing the same song, it seems brutal. Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:44 view
7 Parried Who's parried whom? SD sees this as a duel, each trying to gain some advantage Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:37 view
5 Someone killed her God? Simon? Isn't this a logical fallacy? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:32 view
5 snotgreen sea. pic: https://twitter.com/JJ_Gazette/status/673914678481985538 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:30 view
5 Scutter shit http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:28 view
4 trouser so he's wearing pants Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:27 view
4 jejune Depending on how we understand 'jejune' couldn't the answer be yes or no? Does he starve himself of experiences, or hunger for them? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-15 04:26 view
12 hewing thick slices from the loaf cf Bloom's genteel preparation of Molly's breakfast tray, p53 Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 06:45 view
10 locked drawer We'll visit Bloom's locked drawer in episode 17; May's 'secrets' are just private memories Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 06:02 view
9 I sang it Could Mulligan know Stephen sang this then, so intensifying his assault? Tim Finnegan 2015-12-13 05:58 view
3 like pale oak The Trojan horse idea is intriguing-- 'equine' fits too. Are there further echoes anywhere? (It would be the Iliad not the Odyssey) Tim Finnegan 2015-12-08 15:03 view
3 current The tower doesn't seem to be electrified yet (nor does 7 Eccles) Tim Finnegan 2015-12-08 14:59 view
660 Dublin Post Office Directory http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/012466567?type[]=title&lookfor[]=Dublin%20Post%20Office%20Directory&ft= Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:43 view
661 5 plates http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t6h12wr0t;view=1up;seq=11 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:41 view
661 Laurence Bloomfield in Ireland http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t7gq6x182;view=1up;seq=9 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:39 view
661 2 volumes http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001239631?type[]=title&lookfor[]=History%20of%20the%20Russo-Turkish%20War&filter[]=authorStr%3AHozier%2C%20Henry%20Montague%2C%20Sir%2C%201842-1907&ft= Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:37 view
661 p. 24 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044102865649;view=1up;seq=36 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:35 view
661 Life of Napoleon http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.31175008533526;view=1up;seq=13 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:33 view
661 Stark-Munro Letters http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924013342799;view=1up;seq=11 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:29 view
661 Three Trips to Madagascar http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b577968;view=1up;seq=11 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:27 view
661 The Story of the Heavens http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t5fb4z22m;view=1up;seq=7 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:24 view
661 p. 217 http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b149281;view=1up;seq=229 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:21 view
661 Secret History of the Court of Charles II http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nnc1.50180639;view=1up;seq=7 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:20 view
661 Ready Reckoner http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015035513475;view=1up;seq=7 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:18 view
661 Denis Florence M'Carthy http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=loc.ark:/13960/t56d6fz0c;view=1up;seq=5 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:16 view
662 In the Track of the Sun http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.hnngzm;view=1up;seq=9 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:14 view
662 Short but yet Plain Elements of Geometry http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015057044789;view=1up;seq=5 Tim Finnegan 2015-11-29 11:10 view
3 Dedalus Does anyone know for sure if Joyce pronounced this DEED or DEAD? Tim Finnegan 2015-11-27 04:01 view
8 You said a rare use of italics for direct quotation Tim Finnegan 2015-11-25 03:30 view
8 only is it possible SD is offended by the dismissive word "only"? Gogarty accepting his mother's rejection of Stephen? Tim Finnegan 2015-11-25 03:28 view
77 Dr 1922 uses a rare superscript 'r' here, maybe to echo the sign's typography? (also twice with 'th's) Tim Finnegan 2015-11-22 03:21 view
27 Wh no indent Tim Finnegan 2015-11-22 02:04 view
36 phlegm Pattern of excretions: phlegm. wvarga7a1 2015-11-02 06:42 view
6 bile Part of the pattern of excretions: bile vomited. wvarga7a1 2015-11-02 06:40 view
415 That tired feeling http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/tired-feeling Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:17 view
411 Stag http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Circe Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:15 view
409 tatts http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Circe Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:14 view
405 Tarnally dog gone my shins if this beent the bestest puttiest longbreak yet. http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/the-best-puttiest-longbreak Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:11 view
406 Dusty Rhodes http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/dusty Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:10 view
405 prandypalls http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:09 view
405 Bonsoir la compagnie http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/bonsoir Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:07 view
405 Landlord, landlord, have you good wine, staboo? http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:07 view
405 Tell a cram http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/tell-a-cram Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:06 view
405 blurry http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:05 view
406 Sign on long o me http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/lincoln Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 03:01 view
404 Smutty Moll for a mattress jig http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:58 view
404 Cribbed out of Meredith http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/meredith Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:57 view
404 Lapland http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/lapland Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:56 view
404 Your starving eyes and allbeplastered neck you stole my heart, O gluepot http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/glue-pots Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:55 view
403 Bet to the ropes http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:53 view
403 Ma mère m'a mariée http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/mother Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:51 view
403 armstrong, hollering http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/fitzgerald Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:49 view
401 the wellremembered grove of lilacs at Roundtown http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/pater Tim Finnegan 2015-10-30 02:47 view
397 Lafayette http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:18 view
395 leave his mother an orphan http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/orphan Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:16 view
393 Jacob’s pipe http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/jacob Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:15 view
389 old Glory Allelujerum http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/hallelujurum Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:13 view
384 or was due as with the noted physician, Mr Austin Meldon, to a wolf in the stomach http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:11 view
379 to crush a cup of wine http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:10 view
372 Malachi’s praise of that beast the unicorn http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/unicorn Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:08 view
370 This meanwhile this good sister http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/malory Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:07 view
368 Some man that wayfaring was http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/cuthbert Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:05 view
367 loose boyconnell flux http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Oxen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:03 view
358 Corns on his kismet http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/kismet Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:01 view
357 far away on the pillow http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/billow Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 19:00 view
351 Catch em alive, O. http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/catch-em-alive Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:58 view
350 pettiwidth http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/pettiwidth Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:56 view
349 a light broke in upon her http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/harraden Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:55 view
347 catch it while it was flying http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/catch-it Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:53 view
347 Puddeny pie! http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Nausicaa Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:51 view
338 pay a visit to the Miss White http://www.jjon.org/gifford-corrections/gifford-corrections-3#Nausicaa Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:50 view
334 joyous little laugh http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/harraden Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:44 view
334 Thursday for wealth http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/thursday Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:43 view
334 eyebrowleine http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/eyebrow-line Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:42 view
333 that tired feeling http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-environs/tired-feeling Tim Finnegan 2015-10-29 18:40 view
673 Y. IM MI.Y Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 12:59 view
42 1904 Joyce changed this from 1902, though factually it could only have been 1903 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 04:16 view
687 1893, to the birth on 29 December 1893 of second (and only male) issue, deceased 9 January 1895 elsewhere Bloom and Molly claim Rudy would have been 11 in 1904, so he may have been born in 1892. in any case '1895' is wrong Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 04:08 view
96 The last house actually next-to-last Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:59 view
130 eightyone eightytwo Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:57 view
243 Dame gate anachronism Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:47 view
244 Deep in Leinster street actually Lincoln place Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:46 view
263 wrong not wrong here Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:44 view
383 his intention to buy a colour or a cornetcy in the fencibles and list for the wars Seymour not Bannon Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:40 view
429 Then too far. it sounds like he missed the train stop and had to walk back, but the timing is impossible Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:38 view
461 mix. nux Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:35 view
558 prone, his face to the sky paradoxical, cf notesheet "Head front human, back animal" Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:32 view
582 five two Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:30 view
585 eightyone eightytwo Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:29 view
620 perceived by both meteorologically absurd, they were seven miles apart Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:25 view
622 MXMIV MCMIV Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:23 view
625 thirteen fifteen Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:21 view
626 72 162 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:20 view
631 1893 1897 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:19 view
632 714 762 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:18 view
632 83,300 20,230 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:18 view
632 81,396 B. C. 17,158 B.C. Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:17 view
663 2 weeks and 3 days 3 weeks and 4 days Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:13 view
669 2 Febuary 1888 1 Feb Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:11 view
670 1866 1865 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:10 view
678 elm oak Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:08 view
687 5 months and 18 days actually 6 months and 19 days Tim Finnegan 2015-10-25 03:07 view
366 Universally it's anachronistic, but this paragraph reminds me of a long DNA molecule with mostly 'junk' DNA Tim Finnegan 2015-10-13 02:26 view
722 worse and worse says Warden Daly No one has traced this, though Joyce recycles it in Finnegans Wake as "Woe on woe, says Wardeb Daly." There was a historical Warden Daly in Galway in the early 19thC so maybe Joyce picked it up from Nora? Tim Finnegan 2015-10-09 02:42 view
681 Where was Moses when the candle went out ? The traditional answer to this antique riddle was "In the dark" or later "Down in the cellar eating sauerkraut" Tim Finnegan 2015-10-08 12:00 view
693 his eyes were red when his father died the only hint Molly knew Poldy in 1886 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:58 view
393 a goodly hunk of wheaten loaf, a mother's thought. rare evidence of Ellen Higgins Bloom Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:56 view
503 dear Gerald cf p485 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:54 view
485 dear Gerald cf p503 Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:53 view
356 foreskin Bloom is uncircumcised Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:50 view
634 Higgins (born Hegarty both Catholic names Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:49 view
675 the portrait atelier of their (respectively) 1st and 2nd cousin on p148 Bloom claims Rudolph had a 'daguerreotype atelier'; on p716 Molly thinks it was Lipoti's Tim Finnegan 2015-10-07 13:47 view
405 Too full for words cf p74 where Bloom applies this phrase to horses just after meeting Lyons Tim Finnegan 2015-09-22 03:22 view
366 incorrupted what sense of 'corrupted' here? Tim Finnegan 2015-09-18 12:00 view
366 omnipollent what Latin nuance distinguishes "poll" from "pot"? Tim Finnegan 2015-09-18 12:00 view
366 of evils the original if it be absent is Eve's original sin being blamed here for painful labor? Tim Finnegan 2015-09-18 11:58 view
689 Where ? See Gifford, pg. 12: https://books.google.com/books?id=uW5iTi8f_b8C&lpg=PA12&ots=a1mugZdlHL&dq=gifford%20ulysses%20annotated%20SMP&pg=PA12#v=onepage&q=gifford%20ulysses%20annotated%20SMP&f=false wvarga7a1 2015-08-30 14:55 view
364 next year in drawers does this refer to Gerty's age? Tim Finnegan 2015-08-06 04:56 view
356 papa’s pants will soon fit Willy music-hall catchphrase, cliche of child's growth (Google disagrees with Gifford) Tim Finnegan 2015-08-06 03:01 view
355 Looked round. She smelt an onion. Wrinkling her nose-- he disgusts her? Tim Finnegan 2015-08-06 02:56 view
336 a man among men consensus is this alludes to Lincoln but GoogleBooks disagrees Tim Finnegan 2015-08-04 13:48 view
345 conundrum Gifford says "Slang for a thing with an unknown or puzzling name" but what's puzzling about 'pocketwatch'? instead maybe 'chronometer' or hinting 'condom'??? Tim Finnegan 2015-08-04 13:44 view
331 Howth was this visible then? Tim Finnegan 2015-08-03 05:53 view
187 T Why is the "T" capitalized? I suspect that some or all of this passage ought to have been set as verse. with "Tried" starting a verse line. wvarga7a1 2015-08-01 09:30 view
187 Ulysses This is the first of four instances of "Ulysses" in the text , marking this passage as notable. The character Ulysses appears in Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida, Dante's Inferno, and as Odysseus in Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. The character's "appearance" in Joyce appears to be part of the latter's 3+1 pattern: or why the number "four" is significant in Joyce's book. wvarga7a1 2015-08-01 09:28 view
37 Ineluctable also available here in comic form: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/proteus-comic Tim Finnegan 2015-08-01 06:28 view
77 Pity so empty. Bloom is just using the church backdoor as a discreet shortcut, but he's content to make a show of joining in (why doesn't he express any annoyance here?) Tim Finnegan 2015-08-01 06:24 view
80 southward https://goo.gl/maps/3ixal Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 18:26 view
68 sir John Rogerson’s quay https://goo.gl/maps/Abu1j Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 18:20 view
55 He crossed https://goo.gl/maps/avvUd Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 18:16 view
17 He walked on https://goo.gl/maps/Cir9i Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 17:33 view
619 followed https://goo.gl/maps/d3KC2 Tim Finnegan 2015-07-31 14:36 view
54 Curious mice never squeal. Seem to like it. Bloom/Joyce's masochism as natural law? Cf Christian martyrs?? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-28 04:13 view
5 new art colour cf the citizen's handkerchief on p318 Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 12:08 view
7 oxy or ox-like? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:59 view
8 Humour her Stephen considered this betraying his art Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:57 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly, Although it seems synchronized with Bloom's cloud in episode 4, meteorologically they must be miles apart. Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:51 view
9 loudly even if Haines is standing at the stairs, a loud call would be pretty faint by the time it reached the roof Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:47 view
11 grease butter or lard? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:32 view
12 coming up is she already on the stairs, or coming up the road/path? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:32 view
12 the fry eggs and rashers/bacon Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:31 view
13 entering has Haines signalled her to come in, or did the open door suffice? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:29 view
14 confidently he was nervous she might be able to criticize his pronunciation Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:19 view
17 his trunk page 6 had "his strong wellknit trunk" Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 11:02 view
22 stew the context suggests cramming for army exams? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-20 10:51 view
304 So and So could Bergan be sparing Bloom's feelings?? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-16 10:48 view
304 Delany does joyce omit any british-sounding names? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-16 08:08 view
304 clergy is joyce saying the numerous clergy are a burden? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-16 08:07 view
304 canon in the 1901 census he capitalises this Tim Finnegan 2015-07-16 07:44 view
304 Amongst is this joyce's lifetime-worst paragraph? a list copied from thom's? any hidden redeeming artistry? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-16 07:43 view
307 truth of a libel cf Joyce and Ardilaun? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-14 04:26 view
303 talk steady Ellmann: "Furlan enjoyed this kind of discussion, but was less pleased when he was asked to describe an oil lamp. He fumbled helplessly for the technical language, and Joyce then took over and spent half an hour, in what seemed to Furlan 'a descriptive lust,' explaining the lamp's obvious and minute details." Tim Finnegan 2015-07-14 04:18 view
286 Ah! Ow! Don’t be talking! the alternative reading is that this 'Ow' reflects the 'click' of the drink, not the pissing Tim Finnegan 2015-07-13 12:06 view
285 gave me the wheeze this isn't about Throwaway yet, just payday at the newspaper office Tim Finnegan 2015-07-13 11:42 view
285 the prudent member this is enough of a clue for the others to know who he means Tim Finnegan 2015-07-13 11:40 view
283 he ambiguous, but surely the human Tim Finnegan 2015-07-13 11:34 view
315 Black Beast Burned in Omaha. Ga. 1919 story: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Omaha_race_riot_of_1919 Tim Finnegan 2015-07-12 04:40 view
315 Ga. London Times error for Nebraska Tim Finnegan 2015-07-12 04:40 view
312 our white flint glass down there by Ballybough Gifford says fragments were found in a cave, but I can't find anything online Tim Finnegan 2015-07-12 04:17 view
311 trick of the loop can this really just mean a ring toss game? it sounds more like fancy knot-tying Tim Finnegan 2015-07-12 03:51 view
311 There’s hair used repeatedly in Finnegans Wake, traceable to a Robert Burns song, maybe alluding to puberty? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-11 14:06 view
292 a half one Doran only offers Bergan half a drink?? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-11 04:06 view
5 mummer Specifically an actor in a British seasonal folk play Min Wild 2015-07-09 11:02 view
321 when I got back if the urination has been present tense, how can this post-urination be past tense? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-06 14:00 view
282 ingots among all the fishwords we get this metal, and "seagems" Tim Finnegan 2015-07-03 05:23 view
282 gunnard Joyce's error for 'gurnard' Tim Finnegan 2015-07-03 04:57 view
280 There is should we assume the 'is' is emphasized as if italicised, if joyce ever allowed italics for emphasis which he doesn't? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-03 04:26 view
280 thief Joyce used a real name and address out of Thom's so this was libelous Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:20 view
280 Joe Hynes Hynes was at Dignam's funeral and misunderstood Bloom re McIntosh Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:19 view
281 John of God’s a real insane asylum Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:14 view
281 our friend who? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:14 view
281 alienated not even eaten? Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:13 view
280 any God’s quantity the debt would be a little over $150 today Tim Finnegan 2015-07-02 04:06 view
56 Sad thing about poor Dignam, Mr O’Rourke. Anticipating what he'll say in his head.-- but he doesn't have the courage to raise the subject of death-- weather safer. Min Wild 2015-06-30 12:35 view
286 Ah! Ow! Don’t be talking! As will be later revealed (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/321), these Ahs and ows are sound effects which accompany the urination of our gonorrheic unnamed narrator. David Hayman proposes that at least this part of the tale of Bloom in the Cyclops' sordid den is being recounted by the speaker and his auditor(s) while both are engaged in pissing. bbogle 2015-06-27 09:16 view
286 Ah! Ow! Don’t be talking! As will be later revealed (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/321), these Ahs and ows are sound effects which accompany the urination of our gonorrheic unnamed narrator. David Hayman proposes that at least this part of the tale of Bloom in the Cyclops' sordid den is being recounted by the speaker and his auditor(s) while both are engaged in pissing. bbogle 2015-06-27 09:16 view
316 Didn't I tell you? As true as I’m drinking this porter David Hayman proposes that these sentences can be read as revealing to us that the unnamed Narrator is telling some unknown auditor(s) what he saw some time earlier at Barney Kiernan's pub. That is, all of Cyclops would be a retelling that is recounted at some time removed from the hour in which the action unfolded. See annotations here: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/321 bbogle 2015-06-27 09:03 view
316 Didn't I tell you? As true as I’m drinking this porter David Hayman proposes that these sentences can be read as revealing to us that the unnamed Narrator is telling some unknown auditor(s) what he saw some time earlier at Barney Kiernan's pub. That is, all of Cyclops would be a retelling that is recounted at some time removed from the hour in which the action unfolded. See annotations here: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/321 bbogle 2015-06-27 09:03 view
321 ow! Ows and ahs: a gonorrheal urination. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:54 view
321 ow! Ows and ahs: a gonorrheal urination. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:54 view
321 hoik! phthook! Our friend Joyce vividly illustrating another physiological function in Ulysses: the act of expectoration. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:52 view
321 hoik! phthook! Our friend Joyce vividly illustrating another physiological function in Ulysses: the act of expectoration. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:52 view
321 letting off my load Our friend Joyce vividly illustrating another physiological function in Ulysses: the act of micturation. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:51 view
321 letting off my load Our friend Joyce vividly illustrating another physiological function in Ulysses: the act of micturation. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:51 view
321 cuckoos David Hayman proposes that the use of the word cuckoos synchs the telling of this Cyclopean tale by our unnamed Narrator with the end of Nausicaa; that is, the Narrator is retelling the whole story sometime later in another pub. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:42 view
321 cuckoos David Hayman proposes that the use of the word cuckoos synchs the telling of this Cyclopean tale by our unnamed Narrator with the end of Nausicaa; that is, the Narrator is retelling the whole story sometime later in another pub. bbogle 2015-06-27 08:42 view
319 — But it’s no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that. That’s not life for men and women, insult and hatred. And everybody knows that it’s the very opposite of that that is really life.      — What? says Alf.      — Love, says Bloom. This is one of the moments that really endear Bloom to me. You see people making fun of him etc. all day, and he's quietly holding these very firm and optimistic opinions. Amanda Visconti 2015-06-26 17:08 view
319 — But it’s no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that. That’s not life for men and women, insult and hatred. And everybody knows that it’s the very opposite of that that is really life.      — What? says Alf.      — Love, says Bloom. This is one of the moments that really endear Bloom to me. You see people making fun of him etc. all day, and he's quietly holding these very firm and optimistic opinions. Amanda Visconti 2015-06-26 17:08 view
319 — But it’s no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that. That’s not life for men and women, insult and hatred. And everybody knows that it’s the very opposite of that that is really life.      — What? says Alf.      — Love, says Bloom. This is one of the moments that really endear Bloom to me. You see people making fun of him etc. all day, and he's quietly holding these very firm and optimistic opinions. Amanda Visconti 2015-06-26 17:08 view
3 Stately, plump Buck Mulligan came from the stairhead, bearing a bowl of lather on which a mirror and a razor lay crossed. i'd suggest that if you believe joyce counted the words in sentences you can compile a table of all the sentence lengths and see if the patterns hold globally. Tim Finnegan 2015-06-25 16:56 view
3 a mirror the shape of hand mirrors is a possible source for the traditional symbol for female/Venus: ♀ Tim Finnegan 2015-06-25 16:50 view
319 Love Because Bloom is not the point of view character in Cyclops, it's easy to forget how very heavily the rendezvous between Boylan and Molly, begun more or less an hour earlier, is weighing on his mind during this episode. When Bloom's words and actions are read in that context, a deeper pathos emerges. bbogle 2015-06-25 06:26 view
319 Love Because Bloom is not the point of view character in Cyclops, it's easy to forget how very heavily the rendezvous between Boylan and Molly, begun more or less an hour earlier, is weighing on his mind during this episode. When Bloom's words and actions are read in that context, a deeper pathos emerges. bbogle 2015-06-25 06:26 view
233 She is drowning Interesting that the metaphor Stephen latches onto to describe Dilly's plight is "drowning." He feels guilt ― perhaps not elevated to full consciousness ― because he imagines that all his siblings are drowning in poverty and he can do nothing to save them: each one, including Stephen, can only fend for him- or herself. We must reassess what's previously been on his mind when he has thought about drownings, and maybe extend our consideration of the significance of "agenbite of inwit." The guilt he feels is not only related to his mother's death, perhaps, but also to his incapacity of helping his siblings. In Proteus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/45) Stephen asked himself if, in certain circumstances, he would try to save a drowning man. Now, in Wandering Rocks, he identifies his own sister in a drowning condition right before him. Does he try to help her? No. bbogle 2015-06-25 06:17 view
233 She is drowning Interesting that the metaphor Stephen latches onto to describe Dilly's plight is "drowning." He feels guilt ― perhaps not elevated to full consciousness ― because he imagines that all his siblings are drowning in poverty and he can do nothing to save them: each one, including Stephen, can only fend for him- or herself. We must reassess what's previously been on his mind when he has thought about drownings, and maybe extend our consideration of the significance of "agenbite of inwit." The guilt he feels is not only related to his mother's death, perhaps, but also to his incapacity of helping his siblings. In Proteus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/45) Stephen asked himself if, in certain circumstances, he would try to save a drowning man. Now, in Wandering Rocks, he identifies his own sister in a drowning condition right before him. Does he try to help her? No. bbogle 2015-06-25 06:17 view
220 16 June 1904 Now we know on what day the action of Ulysses takes place. bbogle 2015-06-25 05:39 view
220 16 June 1904 Now we know on what day the action of Ulysses takes place. bbogle 2015-06-25 05:39 view
60 The kettle is boiling he left it on the fire!? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-21 04:25 view
95 A coffin bumped out in imagination only Tim Finnegan 2015-06-20 04:39 view
33 Koch's preparation This refers to the work of German physician and bacteriologist Heinrich Hermann Robert Koch (1843-1910), who performed groundbreaking work on the causes of anthrax, tuberculosis, cholera, and other bacterial diseases. Mr. Deasy is trying to show he is up to date on scientific discoveries. Unfortunately, in this case his interpretation of Koch's discoveries is wrong: foot and mouth disease cannot be cured. For more, see http://cas.umt.edu/english/joyce/notes/020055serumandvirus.htm Heather Munro P... 2015-06-16 16:35 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
3 he Mulligan Amanda Visconti 2015-06-14 15:49 view
218 bridgepiers Recall from Nestor that a pier is a disappointed bridge. bbogle 2015-06-10 14:06 view
218 bridgepiers Recall from Nestor that a pier is a disappointed bridge. bbogle 2015-06-10 14:06 view
221 points of vantage An echo of "coign of vantage" expression used by Stephen Dedalus when imaging a visit to the Richie Goulding house in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:43 view
221 points of vantage An echo of "coign of vantage" expression used by Stephen Dedalus when imaging a visit to the Richie Goulding house in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:43 view
651 For what creature was the door of egress a door of ingress ? Compare to passage in Wandering Rocks (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/224) and Stephen Dedalus' consideration of the difference between a gate and a door in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:28 view
651 For what creature was the door of egress a door of ingress ? Compare to passage in Wandering Rocks (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/224) and Stephen Dedalus' consideration of the difference between a gate and a door in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:28 view
224 The gates of the drive opened wide to give egress to the viceregal cavalcade. Compare to passage in Ithaca (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/651) and Stephen Dedalus' consideration of the difference between a gate and a door in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:26 view
224 The gates of the drive opened wide to give egress to the viceregal cavalcade. Compare to passage in Ithaca (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/651) and Stephen Dedalus' consideration of the difference between a gate and a door in Proteus. bbogle 2015-06-10 13:26 view
83 buoyed lightly upward Recalling his earlier thoughts about the Dead Sea: "Where was the chap I saw in that picture somewhere? Ah, in the dead sea..." See: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/69 bbogle 2015-06-10 12:43 view
83 buoyed lightly upward Recalling his earlier thoughts about the Dead Sea: "Where was the chap I saw in that picture somewhere? Ah, in the dead sea..." See: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/69 bbogle 2015-06-10 12:43 view
265 Seven days in jail, Ben Dollard said, on bread and water. Then you’d sing, Simon, like a garden thrush. Because Simon Dedalus would not have access to alcohol in that time. bbogle 2015-06-10 12:34 view
265 Seven days in jail, Ben Dollard said, on bread and water. Then you’d sing, Simon, like a garden thrush. Because Simon Dedalus would not have access to alcohol in that time. bbogle 2015-06-10 12:34 view
209 Laud we the gods And let our crooked smokes climb to their nostrils From our bless'd altars. Did you enjoy that, gentle first-time reader? Did you have fun? I hope so, because that's it for the kiddie rides. Scylla and Charybdis is the first climax of Ulysses, the first summing-up, a tentative balancing of accounts. Next we pass through the central carousel-carousal that is Wandering Rocks, slowly rotating on its axis: time to catch your breath while it turns through 90 degrees, 180, 270, 360, and then you step off and, what? Huh? Wait! The kiddie carnival is gone! All is strictly adult entertainment from here on in. So keep your hands in the vehicle at all times. Not responsible for lost personal items or innocence. Hold on tight! Here goes! bbogle 2015-06-08 23:12 view
209 Laud we the gods And let our crooked smokes climb to their nostrils From our bless'd altars. Did you enjoy that, gentle first-time reader? Did you have fun? I hope so, because that's it for the kiddie rides. Scylla and Charybdis is the first climax of Ulysses, the first summing-up, a tentative balancing of accounts. Next we pass through the central carousel-carousal that is Wandering Rocks, slowly rotating on its axis: time to catch your breath while it turns through 90 degrees, 180, 270, 360, and then you step off and, what? Huh? Wait! The kiddie carnival is gone! All is strictly adult entertainment from here on in. So keep your hands in the vehicle at all times. Not responsible for lost personal items or innocence. Hold on tight! Here goes! bbogle 2015-06-08 23:12 view
216 Corny Kelleher sped a silent jet of hayjuice arching from his mouth while a generous white arm from a window in Eccles street flung forth a coin. Twin parabolic arcs traced by matter accelerating at 32 feet per second per second under the influence of gravity. See also Ithaca: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/655 bbogle 2015-06-08 19:09 view
216 Corny Kelleher sped a silent jet of hayjuice arching from his mouth while a generous white arm from a window in Eccles street flung forth a coin. Twin parabolic arcs traced by matter accelerating at 32 feet per second per second under the influence of gravity. See also Ithaca: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/655 bbogle 2015-06-08 19:09 view
210 Five to three. (Re: comment by Tim Finnegan: Assuming his watch is accurately set. It appears to be.) The importance of baldly stating an exact, or near-exact, time is that it allows us to reasonably accurately synchronize all the activity of the 19 sections of Wandering Rocks. A few other exact, or near-exact, timestamps which are relevant to this episode may also be found in Sirens and Penelope. No doubt Mr Joyce directly stated the time in the very first paragraph deliberately to signal to us that we *could* synchronize all the action. Synchronizations in space and time are central to a deeper understanding of this pivoting mid-book episode, although it can also be read more superficially with considerable enjoyment. bbogle 2015-06-08 18:53 view
210 Five to three. (Re: comment by Tim Finnegan: Assuming his watch is accurately set. It appears to be.) The importance of baldly stating an exact, or near-exact, time is that it allows us to reasonably accurately synchronize all the activity of the 19 sections of Wandering Rocks. A few other exact, or near-exact, timestamps which are relevant to this episode may also be found in Sirens and Penelope. No doubt Mr Joyce directly stated the time in the very first paragraph deliberately to signal to us that we *could* synchronize all the action. Synchronizations in space and time are central to a deeper understanding of this pivoting mid-book episode, although it can also be read more superficially with considerable enjoyment. bbogle 2015-06-08 18:53 view
23 A voice, sweettoned and sustained, called to him from the sea. Turning the curve he waved his hand. It called again. Mayn't this be conceived of as the first siren's call heard in Ulysses? Aye, it may. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:19 view
23 A voice, sweettoned and sustained, called to him from the sea. Turning the curve he waved his hand. It called again. Mayn't this be conceived of as the first siren's call heard in Ulysses? Aye, it may. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:19 view
163 Nosey Flynn said from his nook. "Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's..." From "Counterparts" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:06 view
163 Nosey Flynn said from his nook. "Nosey Flynn was sitting up in his usual corner of Davy Byrne's..." From "Counterparts" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-06-08 10:06 view
68 Oriental The Oriental motif which emerged in Calypso ― although in Proteus Stephen *almost* remembered a recurring dream involving, or associated with, Haroun al Raschid, who reigned in Baghdad during the Islamic Golden Age and is closely associated with the Book of One Thousand and One Nights ― coils cloyingly throughout Lotus Eaters, always carrying with it a wafting insinuation of exotic sensuality, particularly of a sexual proclivity. bbogle 2015-06-07 19:08 view
68 Oriental The Oriental motif which emerged in Calypso ― although in Proteus Stephen *almost* remembered a recurring dream involving, or associated with, Haroun al Raschid, who reigned in Baghdad during the Islamic Golden Age and is closely associated with the Book of One Thousand and One Nights ― coils cloyingly throughout Lotus Eaters, always carrying with it a wafting insinuation of exotic sensuality, particularly of a sexual proclivity. bbogle 2015-06-07 19:08 view
68 At eleven it is. That is, he has confirmed the hour of Dignam's funeral. bbogle 2015-06-07 18:49 view
68 At eleven it is. That is, he has confirmed the hour of Dignam's funeral. bbogle 2015-06-07 18:49 view
81 her skin First time readers, when they come to Lotus Eaters, sometimes (often) begin to conceive of Bloom as something of a philandering blackguard because of his illicit correspondence with Martha and his sneaking around, ogling women. These same readers usually begin to temper these uncharitable impressions about the time they read a few certain passages in Hades. Joyce is building a tower of expectations and beliefs in his readers which he shall, in due course, tear down, thereby strengthening considerably our sympathy for Mr Bloom. To begin to come to Leo's defense...You will note that throughout the day he never long stops thinking about Molly, in past or present tense, sometimes with humor, but never without admiration. He would never consider actually meeting Martha and consummating this flirtatious correspondence. Would Molly remain so true to him? We shall see. bbogle 2015-06-07 18:46 view
81 her skin First time readers, when they come to Lotus Eaters, sometimes (often) begin to conceive of Bloom as something of a philandering blackguard because of his illicit correspondence with Martha and his sneaking around, ogling women. These same readers usually begin to temper these uncharitable impressions about the time they read a few certain passages in Hades. Joyce is building a tower of expectations and beliefs in his readers which he shall, in due course, tear down, thereby strengthening considerably our sympathy for Mr Bloom. To begin to come to Leo's defense...You will note that throughout the day he never long stops thinking about Molly, in past or present tense, sometimes with humor, but never without admiration. He would never consider actually meeting Martha and consummating this flirtatious correspondence. Would Molly remain so true to him? We shall see. bbogle 2015-06-07 18:46 view
61 he carried the tray in and set it on the chair Interpretation: Bloom's serving breakfast echos Venus in Furs by Ritter von Leopold Sacher-Masoch: "Breakfast." I hasten to get it, and then kneel down with the tray beside her bed. "Here is breakfast, my mistress." http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/6852/pg6852.txt wvarga7a1 2015-06-07 10:46 view
622 gained retarded access to the kitchen through the subadjacent scullery See Gunn's "Figure 3 shows a single view of the model [of 7 Eccles St.]. This example has transparent walls and is part of a fly-through that follows Bloom's path in 'Ithaca' over the railings into the front area, through the door, along the passage, up the stairs and back to the front door." http://hjs.ff.cuni.cz/archives/v7/essays/gunn.htm See Raleigh's floorplan: https://books.google.com/books?id=QsJmAejhq68C&lpg=PP2&ots=TNggYzwWpj&dq=chronicle%20of%20leopold%20and%20molly%20bloom&pg=PA143#v=onepage&q&f=false wvarga7a1 2015-06-07 10:06 view
674 Miss Callan Conjecture: her name is "Ethel." See pg. 26: " Edith, Ethel, Gerty, Lily." As there is none expessly named "Ethel" in Ulysses, the conjecture is that Miss Callan's first name is "Ethel," making the joke of her being "Martha" funny. wvarga7a1 2015-06-06 10:26 view
731 of Mulvey In Calyspo anent a novel Molly asked, "Is she in love with the first fellow all the time?" In Nausicaa, Bloom thought, "Remember that till their dying day. Molly, lieutenant Mulvey that kissed her under the Moorish wall beside the gardens. Fifteen she told me." So "I was thinking of so many things he didnt know of Mulvey" gives the reader an answer: Molly IS in love with Mulvey "all the time" in this novel. wvarga7a1 2015-06-06 10:04 view
56 Dlugacz’s "Dlugacz's, pork butcher, is one of the few invented shops of Ulysses." Epic Geography: James Joyce's Ulysses, Michael Seidel, 1976, pg. 151: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4275560-epic-geography wvarga7a1 2015-06-05 21:30 view
558 fists outstretched Parallax: Stephen Dedalus vs. Private Carr mirrors that fight from May 22 recounted in Wandering Rocks missed by Master Dignam: "Myler Keogh, Dublin's pet lamb, will meet sergeantmajor Bennett, the Portobello bruiser." wvarga7a1 2015-06-05 10:35 view
87 it’s the most natural thing in the world Bloom does not appear to register the innuendo; maybe because his thoughts of Rudy are too sombre or maybe because he really does not share the allusion with the other men. pbohan 2015-06-05 07:26 view
86 the cease to do evil Cease to do evil; learn to do well was the motto over the door of the Richmond Bridewell (prison) which was later part of Griffith Barracks. pbohan 2015-06-05 07:11 view
84 Huggermugger We have done but greenly in hugger-mugger to inter him: Claudius (Hamlet IV v 85) describing the rushed and secretive burial of Polonius, slain by Hamlet. pbohan 2015-06-05 06:51 view
258 4 Lismore terrace Not on maps? Why just here, an exact address? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 13:08 view
258 Keogh’s Who? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 13:06 view
259 two gentlemen Who? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 13:04 view
261 told Told who what? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 12:51 view
258 drummajor Is there any reason to consider this factual? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 06:22 view
260 grave, tall Simon or Dollard or Cowley? Is Simon ever called 'tall'? (Is he singing to his dead wife?) Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 05:21 view
260 A Last Farewell Both Gifford and Bowen think this is a song title Simon sings, but they choose different songs. It's also claimed this is the title of a painting on the wall, but all these are guesses. Tim Finnegan 2015-06-04 05:18 view
242 Passing by Limping, surely? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-03 10:21 view
245 A jumping rose on satiny breasts of satin, Joyce is trying to evoke a wide range of musical instruments, one per line. This would be a viola or violin. Tim Finnegan 2015-06-03 10:17 view
253 one reserve Does this just mean he only needs one? why then two envelopes? Tim Finnegan 2015-06-03 10:14 view
185 Dana See the literary magazine, Dana http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015042108806;view=1up;seq=5 , to appreciate the insult perceived by Joyce from A.E. and his literary cronies. wvarga7a1 2015-06-03 07:33 view
687 10 years Corresponds to the ten years in which Odysseus was absent from Penelope. bbogle 2015-06-01 10:10 view
687 10 years Corresponds to the ten years in which Odysseus was absent from Penelope. bbogle 2015-06-01 10:10 view
59 — Poldy! In the following pages note the inversion of traditional domestic roles: this is the palace of feminine authority with the male acting as servant, as was the case when Odysseus was captive to (captivated by) Calypso. bbogle 2015-06-01 10:00 view
59 — Poldy! In the following pages note the inversion of traditional domestic roles: this is the palace of feminine authority with the male acting as servant, as was the case when Odysseus was captive to (captivated by) Calypso. bbogle 2015-06-01 10:00 view
62 Bath of the Nymph Bloom regards the portrayal of a bathing nymph hung over the bed. Who is Calypso in this episode: Molly or the depicted nymph? bbogle 2015-06-01 09:53 view
62 Bath of the Nymph Bloom regards the portrayal of a bathing nymph hung over the bed. Who is Calypso in this episode: Molly or the depicted nymph? bbogle 2015-06-01 09:53 view
62 reincarnation Should Odysseus reincarnate as Bloom, and should the process happen repeatedly in the fullness of time, then we have the essential premise of Finnegans Wake. bbogle 2015-06-01 09:45 view
62 reincarnation Should Odysseus reincarnate as Bloom, and should the process happen repeatedly in the fullness of time, then we have the essential premise of Finnegans Wake. bbogle 2015-06-01 09:45 view
710 was the first First time readers of Penelope may appreciate the reformatted text (Barger's RobotWisdom) at: http://web.archive.org/web/20111228211806/http://www.robotwisdom.com/jaj/ulysses/penelope2.html wvarga7a1 2015-06-01 07:46 view
711 yes O yes I pulled him off into my handkerchief Biography: see Brenda Maddox's Nora, pg. 21 "...the art of pleasing a man without losing her virtue": https://goo.gl/OD5Z7W wvarga7a1 2015-05-31 09:01 view
710 Mulveys Biography: Brenda Maddox recounts the model for Mulvey in Nora: https://goo.gl/GcEIzp wvarga7a1 2015-05-31 08:49 view
690 Yes First time readers of Penelope may appreciate the reformatted text (Barger's RobotWisdom) at: http://web.archive.org/web/20111228210145/http://www.robotwisdom.com/jaj/ulysses/penelope1.html wvarga7a1 2015-05-31 08:41 view
39 coign of vantage From the Scottish play, description of the castle at Inverness. The birds love it. "Coign" = corner; viz., a useful corner. http://shakespeare.mit.edu/macbeth/macbeth.1.6.html bbogle 2015-05-29 09:22 view
39 coign of vantage From the Scottish play, description of the castle at Inverness. The birds love it. "Coign" = corner; viz., a useful corner. http://shakespeare.mit.edu/macbeth/macbeth.1.6.html bbogle 2015-05-29 09:22 view
618 no pun intended. Interpretation: what's the pun? First, "budding" vs. "blooming" and "bud" vs. "bloom". Second, see Gogarty's verse, Molly, with its deniable smut on "bloom" and "bud": http://goo.gl/910ln6 So an inside joke is Joyce putting down Gogarty upon whom Mulligan is based. wvarga7a1 2015-05-29 08:41 view
618 no pun intended. Interpretation: what's the pun? First, "budding" vs. "blooming" and "bud" vs. "bloom". Second, see Gogarty's verse, Molly, with its deniable smut on "bloom" and "bud": http://goo.gl/U8i44b So an inside joke is Joyce putting down Gogarty upon whom Mulligan is based. wvarga7a1 2015-05-29 08:40 view
618 no pun intended Interpretation: What pun? First, "bloom" vs. "bud", "blooming" vs "budding". Second: see Gogarty's poem of deniable smut, Molly, with its "bud": http://goo.gl/OVCgpF wvarga7a1 2015-05-29 08:36 view
576 humorous element, Dr Mulligan, as a guide, philosopher, and friend, if I were in your shoes Interpretation: note the humor: Bloom putting down Mulligan while Stephen is literally wearing the shoes Mulligan gave him.. Thus if Bloom were "in [Stephen's] shoes" he'd be in those of Mulligan. wvarga7a1 2015-05-29 08:27 view
35 Irish Homestead George Russell (AE) is associated with (editor of, 1905-23) The Irish Homestead. When Stephen goes to the National Library (Scylla and Charybdis), it is to deliver this letter of Deasy's to AE. bbogle 2015-05-28 12:21 view
35 Irish Homestead George Russell (AE) is associated with (editor of, 1905-23) The Irish Homestead. When Stephen goes to the National Library (Scylla and Charybdis), it is to deliver this letter of Deasy's to AE. bbogle 2015-05-28 12:21 view
31 Lal the ral the raThe rocky road to Dublin. Another Irish ballad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxBKgOyMzSc bbogle 2015-05-28 12:05 view
31 Lal the ral the raThe rocky road to Dublin. Another Irish ballad. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxBKgOyMzSc bbogle 2015-05-28 12:05 view
31 Croppies lie down Title of a Protestant, anti-Catholic rebel song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=44&v=orLeh3GsY6s bbogle 2015-05-28 12:02 view
31 Croppies lie down Title of a Protestant, anti-Catholic rebel song. https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=44&v=orLeh3GsY6s bbogle 2015-05-28 12:02 view
31 Glorious, pious and immortal memory. The opening of the Orange Toast of loyal Irish Protestants. See: http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Orange_Toast bbogle 2015-05-28 11:54 view
31 Glorious, pious and immortal memory. The opening of the Orange Toast of loyal Irish Protestants. See: http://www.finnegansweb.com/wiki/index.php/Orange_Toast bbogle 2015-05-28 11:54 view
31 Russell Presumably George William Russell (AE). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_William_Russell bbogle 2015-05-28 11:50 view
31 Russell Presumably George William Russell (AE). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_William_Russell bbogle 2015-05-28 11:50 view
28 The only true thing in life? Stephen remembering Cranly's words and argument from Portrait. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:41 view
28 The only true thing in life? Stephen remembering Cranly's words and argument from Portrait. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:41 view
26 Hocke Field hockey which the boys play. That is, ritualized and stylized violence (sport): imparting through play the tradition of martial violence. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:39 view
26 Hocke Field hockey which the boys play. That is, ritualized and stylized violence (sport): imparting through play the tradition of martial violence. bbogle 2015-05-28 11:39 view
26 an actuality of the possible as possible Stephen reflecting on the unfolding of history, of individual actualities precipitating out of a sea of potentialities in an indeterminate universe; or is the universe determinant, so that everything that happens unfolds as if by clockwork? bbogle 2015-05-28 11:36 view
26 an actuality of the possible as possible Stephen reflecting on the unfolding of history, of individual actualities precipitating out of a sea of potentialities in an indeterminate universe; or is the universe determinant, so that everything that happens unfolds as if by clockwork? bbogle 2015-05-28 11:36 view
37 iambs marching Martial poetic feet: feet marching. See also Joyce's essay on James Clarence Mangan; search on the page for the word iambs. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:35 view
37 iambs marching Martial poetic feet: feet marching. See also Joyce's essay on James Clarence Mangan; search on the page for the word iambs. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:35 view
24 the daughters of memory Haines' earlier casual comment in Telemachus about history being to blame has triggered many of Stephen's subsequent thoughts this day concerning the meaning, significance, and (un)reality of what we call history. Nestor is thematically concerned with history's fables leading so often to violence. To go deeper down this particular rabbit hole, see this 1902 essay by Joyce about the Irish poet James Clarence Mangan. A search on the page for the word daughters reveals the relevant paragraph. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:10 view
24 the daughters of memory Haines' earlier casual comment in Telemachus about history being to blame has triggered many of Stephen's subsequent thoughts this day concerning the meaning, significance, and (un)reality of what we call history. Nestor is thematically concerned with history's fables leading so often to violence. To go deeper down this particular rabbit hole, see this 1902 essay by Joyce about the Irish poet James Clarence Mangan. A search on the page for the word daughters reveals the relevant paragraph. http://andromeda.rutgers.edu/~ehrlich/382/MANGAN1 bbogle 2015-05-28 10:10 view
43 Shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-05-28 09:42 view
43 Shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-05-28 09:42 view
25 ghoststory A ghost story is much on Stephen's mind: the recurring vision of his dead mother, and of her death. The riddle he tells the class might be construed as an age-appropriate version of this ghost story. bbogle 2015-05-28 09:14 view
25 ghoststory A ghost story is much on Stephen's mind: the recurring vision of his dead mother, and of her death. The riddle he tells the class might be construed as an age-appropriate version of this ghost story. bbogle 2015-05-28 09:14 view
176 U Of this episode, Robert Kellogg said: "Formally, 'Scylla and Charybdis' is a mock-Socratic dialogue, with something of the Quaker meeting and theosophic seance added." Hard to sum it up better than that. bbogle 2015-05-28 08:27 view
176 U Of this episode, Robert Kellogg said: "Formally, 'Scylla and Charybdis' is a mock-Socratic dialogue, with something of the Quaker meeting and theosophic seance added." Hard to sum it up better than that. bbogle 2015-05-28 08:27 view
239 Pokorny 1916 Tim Finnegan 2015-05-26 16:55 view
229 grinning can she really be amused? did the shilling allow her to relax?? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-26 05:05 view
96 Childs Samuel Childs tried and acquitted of murdering his seventy-six-year-old brother, Thomas. bbogle 2015-05-24 10:49 view
96 Childs Samuel Childs tried and acquitted of murdering his seventy-six-year-old brother, Thomas. bbogle 2015-05-24 10:49 view
96 Fogarty Mentioned in Dubliners, a grocer-friend of Tom Kernan's. bbogle 2015-05-24 10:44 view
96 Fogarty Mentioned in Dubliners, a grocer-friend of Tom Kernan's. bbogle 2015-05-24 10:44 view
244 Merrion square we last saw him on Nassau street so he's made some progress, maybe passing CBOFTF? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-24 05:08 view
244 Finn’s hotel less than a block from where he collided with the stripling Tim Finnegan 2015-05-24 05:05 view
244 Broadbent’s since colliding with CBOFTF on p240, the stripling has gone several blocks Tim Finnegan 2015-05-24 05:04 view
214 Don John is he really identifying himself with the lothario??? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-23 04:25 view
143 deus nobis hæc otia fecit Virgil's Eclogues, Book I, line 3 God has given us this ease. pbohan 2015-05-22 11:40 view
138 ears of porches Hamlet again (I.5): And in the porches of mine ears did pour/ The leperous distilment pbohan 2015-05-22 10:49 view
137 Hosts at Mullaghmast and Tara of the kings. The locations of two of O'Connell's monster meetings. pbohan 2015-05-22 10:48 view
95 A man I.e., Charon. bbogle 2015-05-21 19:13 view
95 A man I.e., Charon. bbogle 2015-05-21 19:13 view
94 Mrs Riordan "Dante" from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:59 view
94 Mrs Riordan "Dante" from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:59 view
93 Monday morning start afresh. Shoulder to the wheel. Martin Cunningham as Sisyphus, encountered by Odysseus in Hades. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:51 view
93 Monday morning start afresh. Shoulder to the wheel. Martin Cunningham as Sisyphus, encountered by Odysseus in Hades. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:51 view
92 like little Rudy’s was Not uncommonly, first time readers of Ulysses are put off by Bloom's dalliance with Martha Clifford and as various aspects of his character are revealed in The Louts Eaters. But as more of his back story emerges in Hades, a new sympathy begins to emerge. Reassessment follows. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:46 view
92 like little Rudy’s was Not uncommonly, first time readers of Ulysses are put off by Bloom's dalliance with Martha Clifford and as various aspects of his character are revealed in The Louts Eaters. But as more of his back story emerges in Hades, a new sympathy begins to emerge. Reassessment follows. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:46 view
92 Foundation stone for Parnell. Another statue reference. The base of Parnell's monument was erected 8 October 1899; the statue itself would only be added in 1911. Anyone making it this far into Ulysses without knowing Parnell's history should really stop now and do some independent research. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:37 view
92 Foundation stone for Parnell. Another statue reference. The base of Parnell's monument was erected 8 October 1899; the statue itself would only be added in 1911. Anyone making it this far into Ulysses without knowing Parnell's history should really stop now and do some independent research. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:37 view
92 The best death An unpopular opinion among his Catholic companions, for a sudden death precludes administration of the last rites. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:31 view
92 The best death An unpopular opinion among his Catholic companions, for a sudden death precludes administration of the last rites. bbogle 2015-05-21 18:31 view
92 Nelson’s pillar Another prominent statue. Easiest to quote Gifford directly: In the middle of Sackville (now O'Connell) Street, a column 121 feet tall, surmounted by a thirteen-foot statue of Admiral Lord Nelson (1758-1805). In the early twentieth century most of the electric trams that served Dublin and its suburbs started from Nelson's Pillar. The monument was rather ineptly destroyed by Irish patriots in 1966 on the fiftieth anniversary of the Easter 1916 Uprising. bbogle 2015-05-21 17:55 view
92 Nelson’s pillar Another prominent statue. Easiest to quote Gifford directly: In the middle of Sackville (now O'Connell) Street, a column 121 feet tall, surmounted by a thirteen-foot statue of Admiral Lord Nelson (1758-1805). In the early twentieth century most of the electric trams that served Dublin and its suburbs started from Nelson's Pillar. The monument was rather ineptly destroyed by Irish patriots in 1966 on the fiftieth anniversary of the Easter 1916 Uprising. bbogle 2015-05-21 17:55 view
134 pour From Hamlet pbohan 2015-05-21 11:57 view
134 Childs Discussed in Hades as the carriage passed the house in Glasnevin pbohan 2015-05-21 11:56 view
50 Shells Comparing his teeth to shells connects them to the many other mentions of shells in this episode, affiliated with the seaside as well as to Deasy's preoccupation with money in Nestor. bbogle 2015-05-20 23:15 view
50 Shells Comparing his teeth to shells connects them to the many other mentions of shells in this episode, affiliated with the seaside as well as to Deasy's preoccupation with money in Nestor. bbogle 2015-05-20 23:15 view
37 Signatures of all things I am here to read Jakob Boehme: http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sat/index.htm bbogle 2015-05-20 23:07 view
37 Signatures of all things I am here to read Jakob Boehme: http://www.sacred-texts.com/eso/sat/index.htm bbogle 2015-05-20 23:07 view
44 A bloated carcase of a dog "Dogsbody" physicalized. bbogle 2015-05-20 22:47 view
44 A bloated carcase of a dog "Dogsbody" physicalized. bbogle 2015-05-20 22:47 view
122 cretic A poetic foot which scans long-short-long, or ‘O-hi-O’ – rather than the expected ‘o-HI-o’ of standard pronunciation: http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-allusions/ohio-1 pbohan 2015-05-20 07:17 view
221 Ned Lambert I have trouble keeping Tom Kernan and Ned Lambert separate (is that just me?) Tim Finnegan 2015-05-19 14:27 view
240 Metropolitan Joyce's error, Merrion hall Tim Finnegan 2015-05-19 12:30 view
240 behind him but heading in the opposite direction, toward the Ormond hotel to tune their piano Tim Finnegan 2015-05-19 12:29 view
240 cottage fruit cake what is this? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-19 12:20 view
117 See his phiz then. Bloom shows esprit d'escalier thinking about John Henry Menton. pbohan 2015-05-19 11:56 view
115 M. A. P. Mainly About People: a gossipy weekly publication founded in 1898 by journalist and M.P. Thomas Power O'Connor pbohan 2015-05-19 11:22 view
216 white careworn JJOM's complexion is both pale and ruddy, in an unhealthy way. Bloom in Eolus explains he's lost his promising legal career due to drink. Tim Finnegan 2015-05-17 05:29 view
216 bated what is Joyce up to here? it seems to suggest an ongoing conspiracy, with Corny as equal or superior in rank Tim Finnegan 2015-05-17 05:00 view
243 Henry, dernier cri James it's very unlikely Joyce was lowering himself to make fun of (or even salute) Henry James here Tim Finnegan 2015-05-16 03:50 view
218 crinkled what's crinkled (besides the tissuepaper)? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 18:43 view
25 Ethel, Nurse Callan seems a bit old for these boys to be whispering about, methinks. So perhaps is Lily. Hm. bbogle 2015-05-15 08:36 view
25 Ethel, Nurse Callan seems a bit old for these boys to be whispering about, methinks. So perhaps is Lily. Hm. bbogle 2015-05-15 08:36 view
242 unsaluted Joyce uses the word 'salute' everywhere very loosely, and in the Conmee section everyone salutes everyone, but here it seems more freighted? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 08:35 view
238 leaders in section 19 these are described as having "skyblue frontlets and high action" but here they seem to be horses? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 08:30 view
54 green stones Where have I seen this before? http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/19 bbogle 2015-05-15 08:15 view
54 green stones Where have I seen this before? http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/19 bbogle 2015-05-15 08:15 view
237 twirling the peak of his beard he does this in Hades too Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:39 view
237 their different parties? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:37 view
237 marshal John Howard Parnell is a block south in the DBC playing chess Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:36 view
237 corns One suspects a hidden symmetry here, eg p96 "On the curbstone before Jimmy Geary the sexton's an old tramp sat, grumbling, emptying the dirt and stones out of his huge dustbrown yawning boot. After life's journey." Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:27 view
237 ascending towards This image is weird, unless the ceiling was mirrored??? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:22 view
233 having read his little hours He was reading Nones when he encountered Lynch and Kitty, just a few moments earlier? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:09 view
233 Dilly She parted from Simon as the cavalcade left the Park, and will see it pass from Fownes street, four blocks south of here, a mile and a half (15min?) from the Park, having crossed the river and bought a book. So maybe this scene is later??? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-15 07:04 view
227 Those lovely curtains It sounds like her thought, but she's not expecting the profit-- are they being sold by a Dedalus creditor? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-14 14:12 view
25 Ethel, Conjecture: Women named Edith & Gerty appear in Nausicaa; a girl named Lily appeared in Telemachus, the Carlisle girl. There is none named Ethel in Ulysses, unless that may be nurse Callan's name (as in Ithaca, it is noted her first name is unknown). I don't mean the boys are whispering about these particular women or girls: Rather I take it that the reader is to puzzle together these names with those recited in Ithaca: "a nurse, Miss Callan (Christian name unknown), a maid, Gertrude (Gerty, family name unknown)." The reader knows Gerty's family name from the Narrator. Note too these four names echo the four names (of the patron saints of the then United Kingdom) in Circe: "Patrick, Andrew, David, George, be thou anointed!" Four women's names in a boys school in Stephen's head; four saint's names in a brothel in Bloom's head.. wvarga7a1 2015-05-14 07:19 view
731 yes Why “yes” so many times? The series may be interpreted as Molly “is coming,” she is masturbating at the end of her monologue, Penelope, and thus, she fulfills the phrophecy made by Malachi Mulligan in Scylla & Charybdis: the novel has become “a national immorality in three orgasms.” Part I of Ulysses ends with Stephen about to masturbate at the conclusion of his monologue, Proteus: he will come (future) just off scene. Part II shows Bloom has masturbated (past), he has come, by when the reader recognizes him in Nausicaa after which Bloom continues with his monologue. Part III concludes with Molly masturbating (present) before the reader, she is coming. See Fionnula Flanagan, 1985 Joyce's Women (9:33, nudity, masturbation mature video) at: http://tu.tv/videos/molly-bloom-s-soliloquy-ulysses-fionn wvarga7a1 2015-05-14 06:26 view
91 I wish to Christ The Christian sentiment expressed here is doubtful. bbogle 2015-05-13 22:54 view
91 I wish to Christ The Christian sentiment expressed here is doubtful. bbogle 2015-05-13 22:54 view
91 Gray’s statue Another haunting by Irish ghosts. Sir John Gray (1816-75), Protestant, patriot, owner/editor of the Freeman's Journal, advocated disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, land reform, free denominational education. bbogle 2015-05-13 22:33 view
91 Gray’s statue Another haunting by Irish ghosts. Sir John Gray (1816-75), Protestant, patriot, owner/editor of the Freeman's Journal, advocated disestablishment of the Church of Ireland, land reform, free denominational education. bbogle 2015-05-13 22:33 view
22 go to God Interpretation: Why does Joyce have Mulligan exclaim "Go to God"? We might expect "Go to Hell." This exclamation appears to be the first instance of Joyce throwing the reader a clue as to his method: Take something familiar (from Homer, Dante, or Shakespeare) and invert it. Joseph Campbell writes (Mythic Worlds, Modern Words, pg. 15), "Dante depicts Florence as Hell. Joyce reverses this idea: he depicts hell as Dublin." Hence "Go to God" that reverses "Go to Hell" indicates the reader is "not in Kansas anymore." wvarga7a1 2015-05-13 22:27 view
4 to shave Why does Joyce have Mulligan shave? Mulligan's whiskers begin the pattern of excretions/secretions that will follow: everything the human body can excrete/secrete, will be in Ulysses. wvarga7a1 2015-05-13 22:10 view
731 Mr Stanhope Why does Joyce have Molly think of Mr Stanhope? Because the reader has learned that "fathers friend Mrs Stanhope sent [Molly that lovely frock] from the B Marche paris." Plainly, Major Tweedy had been doing to the Mrs what Boylan willl have done to Molly come this day in her marriage: before she accepted Bloom’s marriage proposal she thought of the cuckold, Mr Stanhope. wvarga7a1 2015-05-13 21:53 view
223 Dan Lowry’s ie, the Empire Tim Finnegan 2015-05-13 17:37 view
222 Mary’s abbey here, a streetname Tim Finnegan 2015-05-13 14:29 view
220 capital esses any guesses? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-13 12:03 view
218 chip anyone know etymology/size? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-13 10:42 view
219 Dalkey Is it possible SD has told AA his job is now open, and AA is going to apply??? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-13 10:39 view
7 aproned The garb of a craftsman, one who creates, an artist. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:39 view
7 aproned The garb of a craftsman, one who creates, an artist. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:39 view
7 watching narrowly Watching narrowly....Could this be another of Stephen's contemplations on the God of Creation who has refined Himself out of His Work, watching narrowly from the sidelines? A deaf gardener mowing down the grass stems: that would be an interesting metaphor. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:38 view
7 watching narrowly Watching narrowly....Could this be another of Stephen's contemplations on the God of Creation who has refined Himself out of His Work, watching narrowly from the sidelines? A deaf gardener mowing down the grass stems: that would be an interesting metaphor. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:38 view
7 Shouts from the open window Compare to schoolyard shouts heard outside the window in Nestor, and Stephen's famous declaration that "God is a shout in the street." bbogle 2015-05-12 21:35 view
7 Shouts from the open window Compare to schoolyard shouts heard outside the window in Nestor, and Stephen's famous declaration that "God is a shout in the street." bbogle 2015-05-12 21:35 view
7 ox This bovine ceremony, rife with ritual violence, suggests foreshadowing of the Nestor episode, as well as Oxen of the Sun. We may also consider that Leopold Bloom has been psychically gelded. This little imagining of Stephen's probably bears more weight than is superficially apparent. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:30 view
7 ox This bovine ceremony, rife with ritual violence, suggests foreshadowing of the Nestor episode, as well as Oxen of the Sun. We may also consider that Leopold Bloom has been psychically gelded. This little imagining of Stephen's probably bears more weight than is superficially apparent. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:30 view
7 gilded Debagged: to remove the trousers; in this context a more intimate amputation is implied, and there's probable wordplay at work here involving gilded/gelded. Don't be steered wrong. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:20 view
7 gilded Debagged: to remove the trousers; in this context a more intimate amputation is implied, and there's probable wordplay at work here involving gilded/gelded. Don't be steered wrong. bbogle 2015-05-12 21:20 view
7 Young shouts of moneyed voices in Clive Kempthorpe's rooms. Here Buck professes a readiness to abuse Haines if it will please Stephen. Stephen never went to Oxford and never met Clive Kempthorpe, but Buck did. Earlier Buck flattered Stephen, speaking from experience: "You have the real Oxford manner." Buck and Haines likely met at Oxford. Buck has previously told Stephen the story of Clive Kempthorpe's brutal hazing there, and he may well have participated in that ugly event. Stephen's ability to visualize the story he's heard second- or third-hand, populating it with rich detail ― including the presence of a deaf gardener outside (probably his Matthew Arnold face is intended to help fix the scene at Oxford) ― is remarkable. (Note that Arnold's 1860 work, On Translating Homer, might alone boost his significance to Joyce.) bbogle 2015-05-12 21:09 view
7 Young shouts of moneyed voices in Clive Kempthorpe's rooms. Here Buck professes a readiness to abuse Haines if it will please Stephen. Stephen never went to Oxford and never met Clive Kempthorpe, but Buck did. Earlier Buck flattered Stephen, speaking from experience: "You have the real Oxford manner." Buck and Haines likely met at Oxford. Buck has previously told Stephen the story of Clive Kempthorpe's brutal hazing there, and he may well have participated in that ugly event. Stephen's ability to visualize the story he's heard second- or third-hand, populating it with rich detail ― including the presence of a deaf gardener outside (probably his Matthew Arnold face is intended to help fix the scene at Oxford) ― is remarkable. (Note that Arnold's 1860 work, On Translating Homer, might alone boost his significance to Joyce.) bbogle 2015-05-12 21:09 view
7 they This puzzled me for a long time. Who are "they?" See comments in following paragraphs. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:39 view
7 they This puzzled me for a long time. Who are "they?" See comments in following paragraphs. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:39 view
42 their mouths yellowed An echo of the Chrysostomos material of Telemachus. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:31 view
42 their mouths yellowed An echo of the Chrysostomos material of Telemachus. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:31 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Vinegar is a dilution of acetic acid, if that helps. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:26 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Vinegar is a dilution of acetic acid, if that helps. bbogle 2015-05-12 20:26 view
90 Elvery’s elephant house Sellers of waterproof cloaks, etc. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:54 view
90 Elvery’s elephant house Sellers of waterproof cloaks, etc. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:54 view
90 the hugecloaked Liberator’s form Statue of Daniel O'Connell (1775-1847) at O'Connell Bridge. Fought for and won Catholic representation in the British Parliament. Arrested and imprisoned for sedition and conspiracy. Alleged cousin of John O'Connell, great grandfather of James Joyce. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:52 view
90 the hugecloaked Liberator’s form Statue of Daniel O'Connell (1775-1847) at O'Connell Bridge. Fought for and won Catholic representation in the British Parliament. Arrested and imprisoned for sedition and conspiracy. Alleged cousin of John O'Connell, great grandfather of James Joyce. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:52 view
90 Moira Moira Hotel. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:45 view
90 Moira Moira Hotel. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:45 view
90 Jury’s Jury's Commercial and Family Hotel. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:45 view
90 Jury’s Jury's Commercial and Family Hotel. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:45 view
90 bringing her a pound of rumpsteak Hmmm.... bbogle 2015-05-07 19:44 view
90 bringing her a pound of rumpsteak Hmmm.... bbogle 2015-05-07 19:44 view
90 Crofton Reticent character in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room," fat, conservative, inclined to take a superior attitude toward his fellow Dubliners; said to be too reserved and therefore not much of a canvasser. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:43 view
90 Crofton Reticent character in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room," fat, conservative, inclined to take a superior attitude toward his fellow Dubliners; said to be too reserved and therefore not much of a canvasser. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:43 view
90 Mrs Fleming Housekeeper for the Bloom homestead. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:34 view
90 Mrs Fleming Housekeeper for the Bloom homestead. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:34 view
90 O’Callaghan Gifford: either a disbarred attorney now selling bootlaces or (maybe more probably) an elaborate dramatic embodiment of "a brief and once-popular two-act farce" called "His Last Legs.: bbogle 2015-05-07 19:32 view
90 O’Callaghan Gifford: either a disbarred attorney now selling bootlaces or (maybe more probably) an elaborate dramatic embodiment of "a brief and once-popular two-act farce" called "His Last Legs.: bbogle 2015-05-07 19:32 view
90 Kicked about like snuff at a wake. I.e., in order to mask the odor of death. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:26 view
90 Kicked about like snuff at a wake. I.e., in order to mask the odor of death. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:26 view
90 Smith O’Brien Gifford: They pass a statue of William Smith O'Brien at the intersection of Westmoreland and D'Olier streets. Formed the Irish Confederation in 1847. Attempted to raise the country during the famine in 1848. Found guilty of high treason after attacking a police garrison. His death sentence later commuted to penal servitude. Released in 1854, pardoned in 1856. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:24 view
90 Smith O’Brien Gifford: They pass a statue of William Smith O'Brien at the intersection of Westmoreland and D'Olier streets. Formed the Irish Confederation in 1847. Attempted to raise the country during the famine in 1848. Found guilty of high treason after attacking a police garrison. His death sentence later commuted to penal servitude. Released in 1854, pardoned in 1856. bbogle 2015-05-07 19:24 view
90 Mary Anderson As per Gifford: "the World-Renowned Actress, Miss Mary Anderson (Madame de Marano) in the Balcony Scene from 'Romeo and Juliet,' etc. etc." bbogle 2015-05-07 18:53 view
90 Mary Anderson As per Gifford: "the World-Renowned Actress, Miss Mary Anderson (Madame de Marano) in the Balcony Scene from 'Romeo and Juliet,' etc. etc." bbogle 2015-05-07 18:53 view
90 J. C. Doyle and John MacCormack Gifford identifies them "as among the cream of contemporary Irish musicians in the early twentieth century." bbogle 2015-05-07 18:51 view
90 J. C. Doyle and John MacCormack Gifford identifies them "as among the cream of contemporary Irish musicians in the early twentieth century." bbogle 2015-05-07 18:51 view
243 flagon rare definition, or Joyce's neologism? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 08:30 view
243 Dilly Dedalus Is this before or after she sees Stephen? She parted from Simon as the cavalcade left the Park. If she crossed by O'Connell bridge (free) it would take her five minutes to reach Stephen and a few more to get to Fownes. If she paid the halfpenny toll it would be a little faster. Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 08:27 view
243 stop in front of her she's more forgiving than Bloom was in episode 5 Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:53 view
242 Catesby’s cork lino a brand of floor covering Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:52 view
242 mindful he's an enthusiast of the past, as Haines is of Irish culture, and Conmee of his barony Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:48 view
242 greenhouse urinal Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:46 view
242 surprise why? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:46 view
242 him if the viceroy, why surprised? if Dudley White, surprised he didn't salute?? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:45 view
241 the drunk Bob Doran Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:29 view
240 God’s curse Escalating negativity Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:27 view
240 Coactus volui loosely, I'm doing it against my will Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:26 view
240 shunned the lamp his OCD/paranoia makes him walk outside streetlamps Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:24 view
239 in ten years 'Dubliners' could have been published much earlier, and 'Portrait' took a little longer, but Joyce was pretty accurate about how slowly he wrote Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:20 view
239 deftly So the melange is made with whipped cream, but still not sweet enough for Haines-- so how do the sugarcubes dissolve? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 07:16 view
239 strange he was trained by priests! Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:58 view
239 The joy of creation Mulligan embraces spontaneity in a way Stephen doesn't Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:57 view
239 He will never capture the Attic note How did Joyce rate his own poems? They do seem to lack something Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:55 view
238 D. B. C. Dublin Bakery Company Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:50 view
238 butter and some cakes Mulligan indulges shamelessly at Haines' expense Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:49 view
238 mélange fruits in cream Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:48 view
238 O, but Does the joke remind him? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:47 view
238 Buck Mulligan he was in the Library with Stephen in the last chapter Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:46 view
238 he Haines' artificial value system Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:44 view
236 our friend does this hint at some brotherhood like the Masons? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:35 view
236 Jack Mooney’s brother-in-law Bob Doran, on a bender Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:34 view
236 castle car this seems to be a carriage with driver for the exclusive use of Castle officials (eg Cunningham) Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:31 view
236 list of donors to a fund to help the Dignms Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:29 view
236 Boyd Protestant head of YMCA Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:28 view
236 Ormond hotel Just three blocks north, across the river Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:26 view
235 The landlord has the prior claim Reuben Dodd can't seize Cowley's property because Hugh Love has first claim Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 06:21 view
233 Don’t let see. She'd wonder why he was looking at love spells Tim Finnegan 2015-05-04 05:57 view
233 Maggy probably the oldest, trying to play May's role (cf 20yo Margaret Joyce) Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 14:31 view
233 the other cart in Merchant's arch?? When Lenehan sees Bloom, the cavalcade hasn't yet left the Park, so Dilly is still with Simon (so if she crossed the river by the Halfpenny bridge and visited that bookcart, Bloom should have been long gone) Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 14:29 view
233 Donnycarney This is north of the O'Brien Institute, so Conmee must be going to Artane itself, and it's after Kitty's twig, so after 3:30pm Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 14:23 view
230 westward The throwaway is flowing east, downstream, so it's the hulls and anchorchains that are sailing west Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 14:15 view
229 From the sundial Based solely on the intrusions in the previous section, this has to be before the cavalcade leaves the park, so about 3:25pm Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 14:09 view
215 twig cf "Lizzie Twigg" and her saggy stockings in episode 8 Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 13:58 view
229 out of Parkgate the cavalcade shouldn't take more than 10 minutes to exit the Park, if it started at 3:15, so this seems belated Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 13:12 view
229 from Jack Power did Simon beg? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 13:04 view
229 twopence a shilling is 12p, so Simon keeps 8p Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 13:04 view
227 Dilly the Joyce sisters in 1904 were 20, 15, 13, 12 and 11. If Maggy Dedalus is Margaret Joyce, Dilly is probably 15yo Eileen. Bloom saw her here already 2 hours ago, maybe hoping to catch Simon after the funeral. Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:59 view
228 uncle John the cornetplayer see episode 3: Richie Goulding's brother Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:55 view
227 halfmile the halfmile race will be followed by a quartermile one Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:49 view
227 Barang! This intruded into the Dedalus girls' section after Conmee's ankles, which ought to put it around 3:30pm, but it's followed here by the cavalcade leaving the Park, which ought to be earlier. Could more time invisibly pass between Conmee's ankles and Kitty's twig? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:49 view
226 O’Connell bridge Maginni could have walked from Dignam's court (where we saw him at 3pm) in ten minutes, so this might not be under the arch Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:42 view
226 behind the dingy curtain apparently he knows Bloom likes the ones he dare not put out for display. Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:19 view
225 artist surprisingly thoughtful Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:16 view
225 cubit about 18 inches Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:14 view
225 I was with the wife what does this say about Bloom's relationship with Molly then? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:13 view
224 Master Patrick he'll see Boylan on Grafton street with the red carnation in a moment Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:10 view
224 two bob about $13 today Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:08 view
224 darkbacked figure This image intrudes on Boylan shortly before his phonecall to Miss Dunne whose section had just been intruded on by Rochford's invention, but the timing here seems much much longer than the brief moment there. Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 12:07 view
221 refined accent Reverend Love Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 11:23 view
221 tiny torch a"vesta" was just a small wooden match, so "torch" is poetic Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 11:14 view
220 four 30-40 minutes from now Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 10:31 view
220 them several mysterious hints about Boylan's business Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 10:30 view
220 The disk This intrusion from Lenehan's section establishes the timing as before the cavalcade leaves the Park Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 10:23 view
219 stone metal Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 10:21 view
219 Human eyes cf Bloom with Martin Cunningham in episode 6 Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 10:19 view
215 Mr Kelleher subservient? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 07:35 view
215 detached synchronised by intrusions with Ned Lambert and Mulligan Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:28 view
215 tickled synchronised by intrusion to the Dedalus girls arriving home Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:18 view
214 showed the field is fenced in a way that blocks his view? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:15 view
214 which were not our ways still wrestling with doubts? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:12 view
214 not startled when an otter plunged is this Conmee's poetic image, or borrowed from somewhere? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:08 view
214 lost a self-serving Catholic doctrine that makes priests essential Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:05 view
214 j surely Conmee himself would have capitalised this word?! Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 06:03 view
213 stepped on to a cascade of unrelated events can be synchronised to this: Molly and the sailor (via Corny), the start of the cavalcade via a Lenahan intrusion, which is itself framed by Rochford's invention and Bloom-at-the-bookcart, which align (via intrusions) with Miss Dunne and Boylan's phonecall Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:54 view
214 that not even 'who'? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:29 view
213 old woman compassionate Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:27 view
213 placed Conmee's memories are framed by Joyce like the 'intrusions' from other subsections Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:25 view
213 glasses it's quite likely Joyce is challenging us here to find this couple with serious business on their minds elsewhere in the book Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:23 view
213 kid glove despite the heat? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:20 view
213 dingy unlike Stephen who got his boots muddy in episode 3 Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:19 view
213 poor people Conmee's making a virtue of necessity Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:15 view
212 pig’s puddings a kind of sausage Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:12 view
212 on his beat he'll visit Corny in a moment Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:10 view
212 unlabouring a polite way to say lazy? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:09 view
212 catastrophe Kernan will also contemplate this from a businessman's perspective Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:08 view
212 but occasionally like Bloom he considers both sides Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:06 view
212 more than once expressing patience and predictability? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:05 view
211 most respectfully like Conmee? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:03 view
211 sixeyed they aren't individuals yet? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 05:01 view
211 The little house supposedly a house next door to the main school building, for younger students Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:56 view
210 probably if he gets permission from his father provincial? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:55 view
211 That letter maybe asking permission to go to Buxton Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:53 view
211 cleaned his teeth unspiritual self-advertisement? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:52 view
210 Father Bernard Vaughan is it realistic the Sheehys went to see him? or did Joyce have other reasons here? Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:50 view
210 at Belvedere they'd graduated five years ago Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:47 view
210 M. P. the year before, Sheehy beat Parnell's brother (as noted by Bloom in episode 8). Parnell's brother appears near the end of this episode Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:46 view
210 Dignam Master Patrick Dignam will get the next-to-last subsection of this episode Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:31 view
210 reset meaning 'replaced' not 'adjusted the time' Tim Finnegan 2015-05-02 04:29 view
210 Cunningham Martin Cunningham's letter is mentioned in his section 15 below Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 16:03 view
210 Five to three One of the rare statements of an exact time Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 16:02 view
211 Dignam’s court several blocks south, so not visible to Conmee Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 16:02 view
212 tramline cf Bloom in episode 6 Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:58 view
213 niggerlips a white entertainer in blackface Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:58 view
213 awkward man who? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:57 view
213 explaining something solemn? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:57 view
213 thrown away cf Stephen in Paris, episode 3 Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:56 view
213 ticket fare one penny Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:56 view
213 Mud Island now reclaimed as Fairview Park, never really an island Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:55 view
214 ceiled fancy plaster Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:54 view
214 Old Times in the Barony 36 pages, c1900. the barony was Athlone Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:53 view
215 rededged the closed book shows rededged paper Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:51 view
215 Rathcoffey This is part of the Clongowes reminiscence Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:49 view
214 Howth road stop how does he get to Malahide road from here? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:48 view
215 stepped could Corny have seen this? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:47 view
215 young woman Kitty Ricketts, a prostitute Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:47 view
215 flushed young man Vincent Lynch, see episode 14 Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:46 view
216 yellowslobbered was some licorice yellow? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:45 view
216 stout lady Maybe Molly's housekeeper, Mrs Fleming?? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:44 view
216 J. J. O’Molloy’s it's unclear how long before Lambert's section 8 this occurs-- logically it could be just a few minutes, but the current consensus says 15-20min Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:44 view
216 past Katey and Boody Dedalus in 15min they'll be home, 7 St Peter's terrace, Cabra, but it's unclear where they're coming from and what direction they're currently going Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:42 view
216 onelegged sailor we saw him greet Conmee at 2:55pm so he's taken 15min to get here, coming from the northeast Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:40 view
216 generous white arm Molly intruding from the following section, c3:15pm Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:37 view
216 that particular party who? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:36 view
217 The An intrusion from Dilly and Simon Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:36 view
217 Sister Mary Patrick probably the convent across from the pawnshop Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:35 view
217 her big face Conmee awarded her "queenly mien" Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:34 view
217 Clongowes Conmee's old memory intruding via Conmee's section c3:30pm Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:34 view
217 Boody So it was Maggy, not Katey and Boody, who was trying to pawn them Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:33 view
218 A darkbacked figure Bloom, intruding from section 9 (Lenehan) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:31 view
218 H. E. L. Y’ S. Bloom has seen them around 1pm by the ballast office, and guessed they weren't Boylan's employees Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:30 view
218 jar what? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:30 view
218 bottle champagne for Molly? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:29 view
218 throwaway Bloom's discard from the bridge around 1pm Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:29 view
219 band playing for the bike race, factual; the cavalcade will hear them as it passes. they were announced for 3pm so either they're late or this section is pre-3pm Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:28 view
220 stared at the large poster Maybe Boylan is promoting her and has a copy in the office? Or maybe she can see one outside? Maybe even the one on the Empire, or the one Master Dignam sees? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:25 view
220 Monypeny’s corner just south of Thornton's Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:24 view
220 gaudy notepaper who is she writing to? not one of Boylan's customers!? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:20 view
220 barekneed bagpipe band wearing kilts Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:19 view
222 top disk anachronism from years later Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:17 view
222 The young woman An intrusion from Conmee's section, around 3:30pm Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:16 view
223 for Jervis street headed west-- but was Jervis the only possibility in that direction? or was it named on the car? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:15 view
223 down a manhole true, but years later Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:14 view
223 turn One of the acts in a variety show Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:13 view
223 elderly female reminiscent of the characters in Stephen's Parable of the Plums Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:12 view
223 Lawyers An intrusion from Four Courts to Crampton court, but with no source subsection Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:10 view
224 reappeared Perhaps some longer time after it fell Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:09 view
224 in there Has Lyons waited five hours to lay the bet? Is this the only place for it? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:07 view
226 counter Bloom is in a shop now, not at a cart outside. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 15:02 view
227 having heard these were the real cases heard that day; she was probably just curious/bored. when we saw her last on p223 she had one more session to visit, but the conventional timeline allows her only 5 minutes there before Lenehan spots Bloom. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 14:58 view
230 Palmoil. No one knew yet that the inspector had been bribed to ignore faulty firehoses Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 14:53 view
3 gunrest The stairs did have a sort of 'handrail' but it was just a straight metal pole, not something round you could mount. The roof was designed for one cannon on wheels linked to the central axis, which is the raised round central platform Joyce is referring to. (It's unlikely the builders called it that.) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-30 14:38 view
3 Chrysostomos S. Bazargan suggests that this is a reference to Stephen or Joyce himself. See http://goo.gl/Vxt51u amWard 2015-04-30 00:23 view
232 bookcart Bloom's cart in Merchant's Arch is two blocks west Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:48 view
233 To learn French Heartwrenchingly, she admires Stephen and hopes to follow him in some way Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:45 view
233 penny out of the 14p Simon gave her (1p then was worth about 50 cents today) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:44 view
236 five shillings about $30 today Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:38 view
236 wrote motivating Conmee's trek in section 1 Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:36 view
241 No Sandymount tram It would save him lots of walking, following the path the funeral cortege took, and it normally passes every ten minutes, so perhaps it's out of commission for repairs? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:14 view
241 toff Boylan Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:12 view
241 image of Marie Kendall not the one on the Empire, but maybe the one Miss Dunne also sees? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:11 view
242 Wood Joyce errs or more likely distorts the truth Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:08 view
243 poster The same one Lenehan passed earlier on the Empire Palace Theatre, but maybe not the same Miss Dunne sees Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:06 view
244 Royal Apparently Joyce's error for Grand Canal bridge Tim Finnegan 2015-04-29 15:04 view
358 See ourselves as others see us. Quoting/paraphrasing a line from the last stanza of Robert Burns. (https://goo.gl/3WZRER). The expression is used by Stephen in Telemachus, and by Bloom in Lestrygonians and Nausicca. bbogle 2015-04-27 22:07 view
358 See ourselves as others see us. Quoting/paraphrasing a line from the last stanza of Robert Burns. (https://goo.gl/3WZRER). The expression is used by Stephen in Telemachus, and by Bloom in Lestrygonians and Nausicca. bbogle 2015-04-27 22:07 view
50 My teeth are very bad. Why, I wonder? Feel. That one is going too. Shells. After all that business about chrysostomos in Telemachus it's only now, in the third episode, that we discover that Joyce (and Stephen) was setting up this dichotomy; that is, it is in part because of Stephen's bad teeth that he was sensitive to Buck's golden teeth, even, white and glittering. Stephen was not only describing but contrasting, presumably reflecting on the injustice of the situation. Thus at this line about Stephen's teeth, so far removed from the original observation, we suddenly have a new interpretation, or way of understanding, what had been informing Stephen's thoughts much earlier. How we understood at least one part of Telemachus is subtly altered. Of course by widely distributing meanings and interpretations throughout the entire text of Ulysses Joyce insures that our understanding of the whole is constantly being challenged. This technique makes the book more life-like and keeps us coming back to it as we slowly fall under, and eventually fully succumb to, the spell which Joyce weaves. bbogle 2015-04-27 21:20 view
50 My teeth are very bad. Why, I wonder? Feel. That one is going too. Shells. After all that business about chrysostomos in Telemachus it's only now, in the third episode, that we discover that Joyce (and Stephen) was setting up this dichotomy; that is, it is in part because of Stephen's bad teeth that he was sensitive to Buck's golden teeth, even, white and glittering. Stephen was not only describing but contrasting, presumably reflecting on the injustice of the situation. Thus at this line about Stephen's teeth, so far removed from the original observation, we suddenly have a new interpretation, or way of understanding, what had been informing Stephen's thoughts much earlier. How we understood at least one part of Telemachus is subtly altered. Of course by widely distributing meanings and interpretations throughout the entire text of Ulysses Joyce insures that our understanding of the whole is constantly being challenged. This technique makes the book more life-like and keeps us coming back to it as we slowly fall under, and eventually fully succumb to, the spell which Joyce weaves. bbogle 2015-04-27 21:20 view
202 touched the foil probably an allusion to fencing, ie accepting a challenge Tim Finnegan 2015-04-24 04:54 view
203 Esau In myth, the lapwing is to Icarus as Jacob is to Esau: less favored by Daedalus by prevailing by stealth. Stephen may be debating which of the two he'll turn out to be-- in Finnegans Wake, he definitely sides with Jacob-Shem Tim Finnegan 2015-04-24 04:25 view
197 gorbellied cf p24 above, "the gorescarred book" Tim Finnegan 2015-04-23 12:06 view
196 Shakespeare and company One wants to see a tribute to Sylvia Beach's bookstore, but the phrase was drafted in Dec 1918, the bookstore was founded a year later in Nov 1919, and SB's offer to publish Ulysses wasn't until Apr 1921. (Isn't it likelier she took the name from here?) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-23 11:31 view
194 Charenton This reference is such a nonsequitur one suspects a riddle: could Joyce's personal association be homosexual? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-23 11:15 view
295 Gladiolus Cruentus South African blood-red sword lily Tim Finnegan 2015-04-22 05:02 view
89 Mr Bloom reviewed the nails of his left hand, then those of his right hand. The nails, yes. During this brief exchange Bloom wishes he could refine himself out of existence. See this passage of Stephen's from Portrait: "...The dramatic form is reached when the vitality which has flowed and eddied round each person fills every person with such vital force that he or she assumes a proper and intangible esthetic life. The personality of the artist, at first a cry or a cadence or a mood and then a fluid and lambent narrative, finally refines itself out of existence, impersonalizes itself, so to speak. The esthetic image in the dramatic form is life purified in and reprojected from the human imagination. The mystery of esthetic, like that of material creation, is accomplished. The artist, like the God of creation, remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails." bbogle 2015-04-21 16:39 view
89 Mr Bloom reviewed the nails of his left hand, then those of his right hand. The nails, yes. During this brief exchange Bloom wishes he could refine himself out of existence. See this passage of Stephen's from Portrait: "...The dramatic form is reached when the vitality which has flowed and eddied round each person fills every person with such vital force that he or she assumes a proper and intangible esthetic life. The personality of the artist, at first a cry or a cadence or a mood and then a fluid and lambent narrative, finally refines itself out of existence, impersonalizes itself, so to speak. The esthetic image in the dramatic form is life purified in and reprojected from the human imagination. The mystery of esthetic, like that of material creation, is accomplished. The artist, like the God of creation, remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails." bbogle 2015-04-21 16:39 view
89 He’s coming in the afternoon. Blazes Boylan. Why Bloom will lack the strength to return home too early this night. bbogle 2015-04-21 16:29 view
89 He’s coming in the afternoon. Blazes Boylan. Why Bloom will lack the strength to return home too early this night. bbogle 2015-04-21 16:29 view
89 I said I. That is, not "we"; not himself with Molly. He recognizes here -- as we saw with Stephen, who thought along the same lines at the end of Telemachus -- home [also] I cannot go. bbogle 2015-04-21 16:26 view
89 I said I. That is, not "we"; not himself with Molly. He recognizes here -- as we saw with Stephen, who thought along the same lines at the end of Telemachus -- home [also] I cannot go. bbogle 2015-04-21 16:26 view
59 Sandow’s exercises Eugen Sandow is considered the first modern bodybuilder, and he published fitness magazines and books in which he outlines his personal strength-building regimen. We see Sandow's Strength and How to Obtain It on Bloom's bookshelf in "Ithaca." Apathetic Star 2015-04-21 13:39 view
113 Co-ome From Flotow's opera 'Martha' pbohan 2015-04-21 11:20 view
18 these cliffs The path they're walking on is at the edge of a 30 foot drop Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:08 view
17 Did you bring the key? Mulligan is hinting he wants it, he can't really think Stephen left it in the lock Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:06 view
16 I see little hope Around this time Joyce hoped for a singing career Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:04 view
3 in rapt attention He knows the mailboat's outgoing routine, and plays on it Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 09:00 view
4 twenty quid about $2000 today Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:56 view
5 I must teach you Joyce had chosen to study Italian in school instead of Greek Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:54 view
6 g. p. i. Dementia from syphilis Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:52 view
6 He kills his mother Mulligan here is needling Stephen's greatest vulnerability, the conflict between art and duty Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:50 view
7 Bray Head apparently Joyce's error-- Howth might have been visible but not Bray Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:45 view
7 debagged Joyce's notes suggest Stephen is falsely 'remembering' Oxford where he's never been, confusing words like 'debagged' and 'gilded' Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:44 view
8 Yes Mulligan is fearless, anyway Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:39 view
9 rashers. sausages, cf Bloom's cooking for himself and Molly Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:36 view
10 Liliata rutilantium te confessorum turma circumdet; iubilantium te virginum chorus excipiat. Stephen seems genuinely upset, and may use this cheerful Latin formula to soothe his nerves Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:34 view
10 blood of squashed lice Supposedly the color 'puce' (see Mulligan's gloves below) was favored to conceal lousebloodstains Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:33 view
11 domed designed to support the weight of a cannon Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:30 view
11 O, wont we have a merry time,Drinking whisky, beer and wine,On coronation Coronation day?O, wont we have a merry timeOn coronation day? to the tune of 'O, Dem Golden Slippers' Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:29 view
11 I get paid Unlike Mulligan, Stephen seems reluctant to beg when he has an alternative Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:28 view
12 that subject masturbation Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:25 view
13 prepuces. pronounced PREP-yooces (cf puce gloves) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:24 view
13 Five lines of text and ten pages of notes Joyce very self-consciously packed every sentence with nuances that would require explication, but even Finnegans Wake seems to require less than one page per line Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:21 view
16 your 'your' must mean 'you Irish folk's' since Haines has shown no special respect for Stephen Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:16 view
16 Would I make money by it? Stephen/Joyce had been selling his writing for years so this seems a reasonable question, though the answer is pretty obviously no. Haines seems to feel Stephen is a peasant who should be grateful just to be noticed Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 08:14 view
17 ladder Historically there had been a ladder that could be pulled up, but it's inconceivable the milkwoman climbed a ladder carrying her can, so this must be the later immovable iron staircase Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:57 view
19 fortyfoot hole Probably not named for its depth, maybe for its association with the 42nd Highland Regiment of Foot Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:53 view
19 tinderbox Self-consciously retro Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:48 view
21 piously A mocking gesture to warn them it's a priest Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:45 view
23 a seal's is this Mulligan or a real seal? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:33 view
23 Liliata rutilantium.Turma circumdet.Jubilantium te virginum. Does Stephen find these words soothing? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:31 view
36 path It seems significant that in the first three chapters Stephen never walks on a named road, while Bloom never does anything else Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:28 view
31 five weeks' board Was this where he was living before the Tower? If he'd been paid twice while living there, why didn't he pay her? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-21 07:18 view
88 Crosbie and Alleyne Mr Alleyne is a prominent supporting character in Counterparts in Dubliners. Crosbie and Alleyne's is a firm of solicitors. bbogle 2015-04-20 18:23 view
88 Crosbie and Alleyne Mr Alleyne is a prominent supporting character in Counterparts in Dubliners. Crosbie and Alleyne's is a firm of solicitors. bbogle 2015-04-20 18:23 view
88 Peake The following sentence from Counterparts, in Dubliners: <<He could remember the way in which Mr. Alleyne had hounded little Peake out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew.>> So obviously Bloom is familiar with the story of that Peake's downfall. bbogle 2015-04-20 18:21 view
88 Peake The following sentence from Counterparts, in Dubliners: <<He could remember the way in which Mr. Alleyne had hounded little Peake out of the office in order to make room for his own nephew.>> So obviously Bloom is familiar with the story of that Peake's downfall. bbogle 2015-04-20 18:21 view
187 Said that. His performance is so superhuman this lapse is surprising. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 18:15 view
185 Blushing Stephen has perhaps been violently snubbed by AE, perhaps historically provoking the Holy Office rant. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 18:11 view
180 ghoststory The boys in episode two wanted a ghoststory Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 18:04 view
178 I couldn’t bring him in to hear the discussion. This is the Hamlet-theory Mulligan touted to Haines, but Haines has lost interest Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 18:01 view
177 He holds my follies hostage. Stephen is embarrassed by some of his his past excesses, here something Eglinton witnessed and still teases him about Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:58 view
158 Her stockings are loose over her ankles Padraic Colum guessed the loose-stockings woman would more likely have been Susan Langstaff Mitchell Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:47 view
151 U. P. : up This ambiguity has been argued to imply the card had four characters: "U P UP" but just two characters is more plausible Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:34 view
141 Been walking in muck somewhere. Does Bloom notice this now, or in episode six by Watery Lane? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:28 view
136 Mr chairman A recording exists of Joyce reading this speech Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:25 view
119 I could go home still Bloom hasn't completely resigned himself to cuckoldry Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:16 view
113 through the printing works The Evening Telegraph was in the south half of the building, the Freeman's Journal the north, with the printers shared Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:09 view
109 gramophone Bloom anticipates future media Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 17:05 view
98 whispered No longer Bloom's point of view Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:59 view
89 From the door of the Red Bank A restaurant on their right Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:49 view
88 by Mr Bloom’s window A clue to their seating arrangement: if the 'standard' is in the middle of Gt Brunswick, Bloom is on the right; if it's in Westland Row he's on the left Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:48 view
83 broke a window Anticipating Stephen's song in episode 17 Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:39 view
83 How do you do From the punctuation this is just imaginary dialog Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:38 view
83 Hornblower Maybe his real name, maybe just Bloom's nickname Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:38 view
79 Footdrill Probably just restless foot tapping Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:33 view
74 Cumberland street Very narrow, like an alley: http://bit.ly/1eHOpRh Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:24 view
73 Think he’s that way inclined a bit. Against my grain somehow. Maybe homosexuality Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 16:22 view
88 Paddy Leonard Another character from Dubliners, where he had a bit role in Counterparts. bbogle 2015-04-20 16:15 view
88 Paddy Leonard Another character from Dubliners, where he had a bit role in Counterparts. bbogle 2015-04-20 16:15 view
87 Hynes Joe Hynes appeared in Ivy Day in the Committee Room in Dubliners. In Ulysses he is apparently writing for the Freeman's Journal. bbogle 2015-04-20 16:09 view
87 Hynes Joe Hynes appeared in Ivy Day in the Committee Room in Dubliners. In Ulysses he is apparently writing for the Freeman's Journal. bbogle 2015-04-20 16:09 view
65 opened it There's a door between the kitchen and the stairs, that also gives access to the back door. Bloom expects the cat will want the back door opened too, but it chooses the stairs instead. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:46 view
65 Hope no ape comes knocking So the outhouse is shared with neighbors? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:41 view
62 having wiped her fingertips smartly on the blanket Hilarious and eloquent Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:34 view
60 ringwise Why? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:29 view
59 Mrs Marion Boylan's bad manners: it should say "Mrs Leopold" Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:25 view
59 Why is that? Bloom fights depression by mental exercises Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:23 view
58 A cloud began to cover the sun wholly slowly wholly. Though Joyce might have thought it could be the same cloud as in episode one, the geometry is impossible Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:22 view
57 to the right Implying the butcher shop is on the east side of Dorset street Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:19 view
57 Eccles' Lane On old maps this is where St Joseph's Parade was in 1904 (not to be confused with Eccles Street or Eccles Place) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 15:18 view
57 Woods his name is. Wonder what he does. Wife is oldish. According to the 1901 census he was a 'carrier' aged 50, his wife aged 40, both illiterate. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:59 view
56 Dlugacz’s window Apparently he's crossed Dorset street, because when he sees his neighbor leave she turns right Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:55 view
55 Well, meet him. Ambiguous-- maybe 'embrace the risks' Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:52 view
55 Plasto’s Cheaply made Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:49 view
55 officers are in the swim Echoes the swimmers in episode one Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:48 view
54 Tweedy Penelope's father was Icarius, Calypso's was probably Atlas Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:47 view
54 Still perhaps : once in a way. A difficult sentence Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:42 view
54 milkman It seems likelier the milkman visited before the episode starts, than that Bloom has already ventured out once to Hanlon's shop. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:40 view
53 Wonder what I look like to her. Bloom shows vast empathy Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:37 view
53 tower Paralleling episode one Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:36 view
53 The cat Never named Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:35 view
53 writingtable In episode 17 (p662ff) we'll see Bloom writing at a table with two drawers in the center of the livingroom, but that seems like the place for their dining table, not his writingtable. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 14:02 view
48 What she? He's choosing a female to fantasize about Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:46 view
47 trudges, schlepps, trains, drags, trascines Searching for the best synonym Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:42 view
42 a saucer of acetic acid Any guesses what this was for? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:34 view
41 Ring-send A village he may be walking towards Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:31 view
40 what else were they invented for? Biologically, it's more accurate to say women invented men for sex Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:28 view
38 Am I going to Aunt Sara's or not? A mysterious clue correlated somehow to a sighting near the start of episode six Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:23 view
38 the liberties A slum south of the Liffey, associated for both Stephen and Bloom with prostitution Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:20 view
38 the steps from Leahy's terrace We know exactly where these were, one of the very few fixed landmarks in the episode. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:18 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. [spoiler] Foreshadows a later anecdote of Deasy's disagreeable wife throwing soup at a waiter Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 13:14 view
659 ritirando The expected term would be "ritardando" Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 08:02 view
688 westward Actually eastward Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:59 view
683 some crumbs Echoing the funeral carriage in episode six Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:54 view
682 to the foot The consensus is he habitually sleeps this way because he's obsessed with Molly's arse Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:53 view
682 perceived Molly left a light on in the bedroom Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:51 view
681 timber Not majolicacovered? Or both timber and inlay? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:49 view
680 before rising From the table? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:47 view
675 2nd drawer Maybe no lock, maybe just unopened Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:45 view
673 unlocked All these meditations have flashed through his mind as he sits at the table with the statue. (Maybe it was the key to the drawer he hid among the books?) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:40 view
666 carbon monoxide There's no explanation for this except to suggest Bloom is suicidally upset by whatever he'd hidden among the books. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:32 view
665 ultimate ambition Bloom may be soothing his anxiety by this habitual fantasy Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:31 view
663 10 October 1903 The last time he wore funeral clothes Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:28 view
663 sitting A moment ago he was standing in front of the fireplace, then he straightened the books on their shelves, now he's sitting at a "central" table with a statue and two drawers-- presumably the table he called "my writingtable" on page 53. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:26 view
662 the insecurity of hiding any secret document behind, beneath or between the pages of a book Bloom had hidden something, not anticipating anyone would move the books; now he's heartsick to think what he hid was found by Molly and Boylan. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:23 view
662 closestool This enclosed chamberpot could not have been present in the livingroom, so neither are the apple and umbrella Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:22 view
661 gilt Scintillating? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:20 view
660 inverted volumes improperly arranged By Molly or Boylan or the movers, maybe to make moving the bookshelves easier, maybe by Boylan making fun of Bloom, maybe by Molly looking something up? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:17 view
660 in the order of their common letters Alphabetical? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:15 view
660 scintillating Gold-colored? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:14 view
660 the two bookshelves opposite Between the piano and the windows? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:12 view
659 homothetic Maybe: implying a microcosm? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 07:02 view
659 mantelpiece He can reach both table and mantel Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:46 view
659 pleasant diffusion of gradual discolouration So he's relieved to see evidence she cheated Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:43 view
659 discoloured Lipstick? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:39 view
658 similitude Is Bloom thinking the easychair resembles Molly while the cane chair resembles Boylan (thus mistaking their real positions)? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:38 view
658 directly opposite Probably Molly was sitting here before she moved onto Boylan's knee Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:32 view
658 a centralised diffusing and diminishing discolouration Molly's interior monolog will explain she had Boylan sit here, and he took off his pants without asking, and she sat on his knee while "he was so busy where he oughtnt to be". But if this is a wet spot still drying hours later was it just their juices, or did something else spill? Maybe she tried to wash some evidence away? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:28 view
658 inlaid majolicatopped Expensive, but unlikely to have lockable drawers? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:21 view
658 the position originally occupied Mysteriously unspecified! Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:19 view
658 more advantageous Why? Closer to the dining table? More visible to guests? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:19 view
658 the door of the front room Which way it opened is unclear Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:18 view
658 hallfloor The upper floors wouldn't need halls (the hall is so residents of the upper floors can reach the front door without disturbing the residents of the hallfloor) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:16 view
658 beside the door On the left as you enter Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:13 view
658 table In a moment Bloom will sit down at "the central table" which has two drawers, at least one of which is lockable. So either "central" and "opposite the door" are compatible descriptions, or there's a second table in the middle of this extremely cramped room. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 06:10 view
658 opposite the door To the right of the fireplace? Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 05:55 view
658 ingleside More usually a capitalised placename than (as here) an apparent synonym for fireside or inglenook. The fireplace would have been somewhere along the northwest wall, apparently closer to the southwest end by the windows. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 05:49 view
658 alterations effected Barger suggests Boylan arrived with a rented piano (so Molly directed Boylan and the deliverymen how to clear a space for it by the door) Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 05:48 view
658 right temporal lobe Just above his right ear Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 05:45 view
658 a solid timber angle The upper right corner of a tall walnut sideboard for dishes Tim Finnegan 2015-04-20 05:45 view
86 crust-crumbs Crumbs left scattered at the scene in flagrante delicto, prefiguring the flecks of Plumtree's Potted Meat which eventually will be found to festoon Molly's bed. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:36 view
86 crust-crumbs Crumbs left scattered at the scene in flagrante delicto, prefiguring the flecks of Plumtree's Potted Meat which eventually will be found to festoon Molly's bed. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:36 view
86 Noisy selfwilled man. Full of his son. He is right. Simon Dedalus' protective response to a perceived threat or accosting of his son triggers parallel (if truncated and wistful) feelings in Bloom, which he'll subsequently revisit throughout the day. This linkage, established by Simon Dedalus' words here, will allow for Bloom to gradually transfer his emotion from Rudy to Stephen Dedalus: note that Bloom first judges Simon as a "noisy selfwilled man," which will help Bloom, in a psychological sense, to be dismissive of Simon's effective role in providing adequate paternalism and so open the door for Bloom to enter in and play that role. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:25 view
86 Noisy selfwilled man. Full of his son. He is right. Simon Dedalus' protective response to a perceived threat or accosting of his son triggers parallel (if truncated and wistful) feelings in Bloom, which he'll subsequently revisit throughout the day. This linkage, established by Simon Dedalus' words here, will allow for Bloom to gradually transfer his emotion from Rudy to Stephen Dedalus: note that Bloom first judges Simon as a "noisy selfwilled man," which will help Bloom, in a psychological sense, to be dismissive of Simon's effective role in providing adequate paternalism and so open the door for Bloom to enter in and play that role. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:25 view
75 he read the letter again Note that Bloom reads and re-reads as a deliberate means of memorizing text; the same behavior we saw with the Milly letter in Calypso. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:07 view
75 he read the letter again Note that Bloom reads and re-reads as a deliberate means of memorizing text; the same behavior we saw with the Milly letter in Calypso. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:07 view
64 Then he read the letter again : twice. Note that Bloom reads and re-reads as a deliberate means of memorizing text; the same behavior will be repeated with the Martha Clifford letter in Lotus Eaters. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:03 view
64 Then he read the letter again : twice. Note that Bloom reads and re-reads as a deliberate means of memorizing text; the same behavior will be repeated with the Martha Clifford letter in Lotus Eaters. bbogle 2015-04-17 12:03 view
62 Some people believe, he said, that we go on on living in another body after death, that we lived before. They call it reincarnation. Reincarnation isn't the same as metempsychosis. The former requires death to move into a different form, the latter doesn't Apathetic Star 2015-04-16 10:36 view
37 iambs Stephen has made a mistake. The syllables are trochees (stressed syllable, unstressed syllable), not iambs (unstressed syllable, stressed syllable, made famous by Shakespearean verse). Despite his intellectualism, Stephen DOES make mistakes Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 21:29 view
3 faced about "to turn and face in the opposite direction" (Macmillan Dictionary) grf 2015-04-15 19:11 view
85 Ignatius Gallaher Successful Irish expat, a journalist, come back to Dublin in "A Little Cloud" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 18:12 view
85 Ignatius Gallaher Successful Irish expat, a journalist, come back to Dublin in "A Little Cloud" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 18:12 view
84 Mr Power It was Jack Power who rescued Tom Kernan from an unfortunate brush with the law in "Grace" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 17:47 view
84 Mr Power It was Jack Power who rescued Tom Kernan from an unfortunate brush with the law in "Grace" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 17:47 view
82 Bantam Lyons He is mentioned as a tenant in "The Boarding House" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 17:03 view
82 Bantam Lyons He is mentioned as a tenant in "The Boarding House" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-04-15 17:03 view
80 candles melting Recall Buck Mulligan's abortive joke about the melting candle in Telemachus: the cause of the blushes she might wish to hide. bbogle 2015-04-15 16:44 view
80 candles melting Recall Buck Mulligan's abortive joke about the melting candle in Telemachus: the cause of the blushes she might wish to hide. bbogle 2015-04-15 16:44 view
279 Prrprr.      Must be the bur.      Fff. Oo. Rrpr.      Nations of the earth. No-one behind. She’s passed. Then and not till then. Tram. Kran, kran, kran. Good oppor. Coming. Krandlkrankran. I’m sure it’s the burgund. Yes. One, two. Let my epitaph be. Kraaaaaaaa. Written. I have. Pprrpffrrppfff.      Done This narrates Bloom farting just a little bit ("Pprrp. Fff. Oo."), making sure the lady behind him didn't hear, and deciding to hold it in until the "Kran kran kran" of the upcoming tram offers "a good oppor"[tunity] to cover it with a loud noise. When it brakes ("Krraaaaaaa") he lets loose ("PPrrrpprrfffprrff"). This chapter, "Sirens," is the music chapter, so ending it with Bloom's windy instrument is not only funny but thematically appropriate. Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 14:21 view
74 world See page 152 for explication Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 13:03 view
152 called you naughty darling because I do not like that other world Bloom quoting Martha's letter from earlier. Note the misspelling of "word" as "world" - whoever Martha is, she is not a very good typist, even though she responded to Bloom's ad in the hopes of employment as one Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 13:02 view
152 Wanted smart lady typist to aid gentleman in literary work. References an ad Bloom placed in the Irish Times. Martha responds to help him with his "literary work" Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 12:58 view
74 I do wish I could punish you for that. I called you naughty boy Bloom enjoys the "D" and "S" of BDSM - discipline and submission. See "Circe" for an extended scene. Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 12:55 view
75 MARTHA Considering that Bloom's wife is named "Marion" and his mistress is named "Martha," one could consider Bloom as either a Christ figure (in the home of Mary and Martha) or as Lazarus, the brother, or potentially both - Bloom as resurrector and resurrected. See next chapter for explicit references to Lazarus and resurrection Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 12:51 view
61 A strip of torn envelope peeped from under the dimpled pillow. In the act of going he stayed to straighten the bedspread.      — Who was the letter from? he asked.      Bold hand. Marion.      — O, Boylan, she said [Spoiler Alert] We later learn that Blazes Boylan is a man with whom Molly is having an affair, hence the attempt to hide the letter out of sight and brush it off as a work-related matter - even though Bloom already knows about the extra-marital relations. He himself is also engaged in a (solely) epistolary affair with a woman named Martha Clifford, whose letter to Bloom we see in the next chapter. This marks an instance that slips by, but it actually contains a lot of information on the upcoming narrative and insight into the Blooms' marriage. Apathetic Star 2015-04-15 12:25 view
77 Martin Cunningham Appears in "Grace" in Dubliners. Resembles William Shakespeare in countenance. A good-souled man married to a tosspot harridan. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:56 view
77 Martin Cunningham Appears in "Grace" in Dubliners. Resembles William Shakespeare in countenance. A good-souled man married to a tosspot harridan. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:56 view
77 the very reverend John Conmee S. J. Rector of Clongowes Wood College when Stephen Dedalus attended; later, prefect of studies at Belvedere College when Stephen attended there. Prominent figure in the Wandering Rocks episode. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:47 view
77 the very reverend John Conmee S. J. Rector of Clongowes Wood College when Stephen Dedalus attended; later, prefect of studies at Belvedere College when Stephen attended there. Prominent figure in the Wandering Rocks episode. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:47 view
75 meaning of that word As Molly had asked him for the meaning of the word metempsychosis: consulting Bloom the lexicologist. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:20 view
75 meaning of that word As Molly had asked him for the meaning of the word metempsychosis: consulting Bloom the lexicologist. bbogle 2015-04-14 15:20 view
73 Bob Cowley About him Gifford says: "A 'spoiled priest,' that is, a priest who has drifted out of his calling but not flamboyantly enough to be unfrocked by the Church and not courageously enough to request that he be released from his vows. Cowley appears later in the novel." bbogle 2015-04-14 15:00 view
73 Bob Cowley About him Gifford says: "A 'spoiled priest,' that is, a priest who has drifted out of his calling but not flamboyantly enough to be unfrocked by the Church and not courageously enough to request that he be released from his vows. Cowley appears later in the novel." bbogle 2015-04-14 15:00 view
77 Damn it. In chapter four, Bloom could not remember removing his hat-probably because of the tension caused by Boylan's letter- but now he makes an association with Milly's letter. pbohan 2015-04-10 11:02 view
67 Poor Dignam! When we catch up with Bloom next, he is already on the other side of the city so it is reasonable to assume that there is a farewell conversation with Molly outside the narrative when she confirms the time she expects Boylan and Bloom indicates he will not interrupt them. pbohan 2015-04-10 10:40 view
67 Ponchielli’s dance of the hours From the opera La Gioconda: it represents the passing of one day through dance and music. A possible inspiration for the structure of Ulysses. pbohan 2015-04-10 10:36 view
63 student Bannon: mentioned by Mulligan in chapter one. pbohan 2015-04-10 10:31 view
73 papa Rudolph Bloom was a suicide so Leopold's mind makes the association. pbohan 2015-04-10 10:27 view
72 body This is the drowning that occupied Stephen's thoughts in chapter one. pbohan 2015-04-10 10:22 view
55 felt in his hip pocket for the latchkey Missing key Manek 2015-04-05 21:26 view
55 White slip of paper. Card with the name Henry Flowers on it. Manek 2015-04-05 21:25 view
54 the loose brass quoits of the bedstead jingled Repeating motif, foreshadows the coming adultery Manek 2015-04-05 21:17 view
75 the Coombe The Coombe is a street in a poor neighborhood called the Liberties. Joyce hints that it was similar to Nighttown in offering prostitution. Tim Finnegan 2015-04-02 03:19 view
82 risk Lyons will try a bet on this other outsider. pbohan 2015-03-30 15:39 view
53 my There are many deliberate ambivalences in this chapter. This 'my' could be Bloom thinking or even an intromission by Joyce. Later, 'she' might refer to either Molly or the cat. Molly is both Calypso and Penelope. Unlike Stephen who insists on 'only one sense of the word', Bloom is associated with many senses. pbohan 2015-03-30 15:04 view
70 outsider A type of jaunting car but also suggesting Bloom's status and anticipating the Throwaway bet. pbohan 2015-03-30 14:59 view
72 Who’s getting it up? The first inadvertent taunting of L Bloom. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:58 view
72 Who’s getting it up? The first inadvertent taunting of L Bloom. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:58 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. Going completely subjective: simply a lovely sentence. Notice how the episode ends, regardless, with one last grace note ringing a major motif of this episode: coins. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:49 view
36 On his wise shoulders through the checkerwork of leaves the sun flung spangles, dancing coins. Going completely subjective: simply a lovely sentence. Notice how the episode ends, regardless, with one last grace note ringing a major motif of this episode: coins. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:49 view
442 gauntlets with braided drums Probably the braids on the back of her gloves. See: http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/drums. Within Ulysses, see also, in Lotus-Eaters: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/71 bbogle 2015-03-30 05:35 view
442 gauntlets with braided drums Probably the braids on the back of her gloves. See: http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/drums. Within Ulysses, see also, in Lotus-Eaters: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/71 bbogle 2015-03-30 05:35 view
71 braided drums Probably the braids on the back of her gloves. See: http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/drums. Within Ulysses, see also, in Circe: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/442 bbogle 2015-03-30 05:34 view
71 braided drums Probably the braids on the back of her gloves. See: http://www.jjon.org/joyce-s-words/drums. Within Ulysses, see also, in Circe: http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/442 bbogle 2015-03-30 05:34 view
71 vailed Lowered in submission or feigned respect. See: http://goo.gl/4EMFCj bbogle 2015-03-30 05:26 view
71 vailed Lowered in submission or feigned respect. See: http://goo.gl/4EMFCj bbogle 2015-03-30 05:26 view
71 Brutus is an honourable man Julius Caeser allusion. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:18 view
71 Brutus is an honourable man Julius Caeser allusion. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:18 view
70 Holohan. You know Hoppy? Hoppy Holohan appears in "A Mother" in Dubliners: <<MR HOLOHAN, assistant secretary of the Eire Abu Society, had been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his hands and pockets full of dirty pieces of paper, arranging about the series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called him Hoppy Holohan. He walked up and down constantly, stood by the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in the end it was Mrs. Kearney who arranged everything.>> bbogle 2015-03-30 05:17 view
70 Holohan. You know Hoppy? Hoppy Holohan appears in "A Mother" in Dubliners: <<MR HOLOHAN, assistant secretary of the Eire Abu Society, had been walking up and down Dublin for nearly a month, with his hands and pockets full of dirty pieces of paper, arranging about the series of concerts. He had a game leg and for this his friends called him Hoppy Holohan. He walked up and down constantly, stood by the hour at street corners arguing the point and made notes; but in the end it was Mrs. Kearney who arranged everything.>> bbogle 2015-03-30 05:17 view
70 M’Coy Appears in "Grace" in Dubliners., where it is said of him: <<Mr. M'Coy had been at one time a tenor of some reputation. His wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play the piano at low terms. His line of life had not been the shortest distance between two points and for short periods he had been driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland Railway, a canvasser for advertisements for The Irish Times and for The Freeman's Journal, a town traveller for a coal firm on commission, a private inquiry agent, a clerk in the office of the Sub-Sheriff, and he had recently become secretary to the City Coroner. His new office made him professionally interested in Mr. Kernan's case.>> bbogle 2015-03-30 05:11 view
70 M’Coy Appears in "Grace" in Dubliners., where it is said of him: <<Mr. M'Coy had been at one time a tenor of some reputation. His wife, who had been a soprano, still taught young children to play the piano at low terms. His line of life had not been the shortest distance between two points and for short periods he had been driven to live by his wits. He had been a clerk in the Midland Railway, a canvasser for advertisements for The Irish Times and for The Freeman's Journal, a town traveller for a coal firm on commission, a private inquiry agent, a clerk in the office of the Sub-Sheriff, and he had recently become secretary to the City Coroner. His new office made him professionally interested in Mr. Kernan's case.>> bbogle 2015-03-30 05:11 view
71 Bantam Lyons Appears as "Mr Lyons" in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:08 view
71 Bantam Lyons Appears as "Mr Lyons" in "Ivy Day in the Committee Room" in Dubliners. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:08 view
71 Bob Doran Character appearing in "The Boarding House" in Dubliners, where he is trapped in a marriage. Later in Cyclops we'll see him rip-roaring drunk. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:03 view
71 Bob Doran Character appearing in "The Boarding House" in Dubliners, where he is trapped in a marriage. Later in Cyclops we'll see him rip-roaring drunk. bbogle 2015-03-30 05:03 view
53 O Contrast Bloom's "O" with Molly's first syllable to come. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 18:06 view
705 come "Come" is the essential pun in Ulysses: a noun, a verb: not only motion, but also orgasm and semen. This is the last instance of "come" used for orgasm, although there are eight more instances to come in the Penelope episode. Recognition of Joyce's pun is part of the fun in the novel. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 17:52 view
65 Come, come, pussy. Come These are (arguably) Molly's last audible words in the novel, as (arguably) the words in the Penelope episode are thought, not spoken aloud, by Molly. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 14:52 view
54 milkman There's no need for a "milkman" to come to 7 Eccles Street as there was for a "milkwoman" to come to the Martello Tower in the Telemachus episode. wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 14:47 view
42 Mother Later editions correct "Mother dying" to "Nother dyng" hence being a "curiosity." See Ellmann in NYT: https://goo.gl/b2TFtd wvarga7a1 2015-03-29 14:28 view
69 Sleep six months out of twelve. The intrusive indolence of the land of the lotus-eaters begins to settle into this episode already. bbogle 2015-03-29 05:38 view
69 Sleep six months out of twelve. The intrusive indolence of the land of the lotus-eaters begins to settle into this episode already. bbogle 2015-03-29 05:38 view
9 a bowl of bitter waters. A reference to the bile of Stephen's mother and, by extension, his own act of insubordination by not praying for her. indigoecho 2015-03-27 06:40 view
38 Hello. Kinch here. Put me on to Edenville. Aleph, alpha: nought, nought, one. Here Stephen is comparing the umbilical cord to telephone lines. He imitates a phone call to Adam and Eve in the biblical Eden, demonstrating both the interconnected nature of human existence (paralleling how all humans are derived from Adam and Eve with the contemporary connections made through the telephone) and the extent of Stephen's creative imagination. indigoecho 2015-03-27 06:25 view
5 hyperborean By using "hyperborean" in the sense of "disbeliever", Mulligan is alluding to the introduction of Nietzsche's "Antichrist", which was a very new book at that time. He will allude to Nietzsche once more at the end of the chapter. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-26 17:35 view
32 foot and mouth disease Gilbert (pp 112-3) purports that Deasy's interest in cattle relates to the association between the home of Nestor near the River Alpheus, commonly associated with oxen. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:51 view
32 foot and mouth disease Gilbert (pp 112-3) purports that Deasy's interest in cattle relates to the association between the home of Nestor near the River Alpheus, commonly associated with oxen. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:51 view
29 Mr Deasy A venerated geezer at the time of the Trojan War and a legendary horseman from days of yore, Nestor (Deasy) was a sort of Polonious-type, better known for dispensing outmoded advice than for achievements won in the execution thereof. Too old to fight at Troy himself, this master of war never failed to urge young men to do so. In seeking Odysseus, Telemachus (Stephen) first visited Nestor, where he heard a wealth of opinion and learned little information of use. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:22 view
29 Mr Deasy A venerated geezer at the time of the Trojan War and a legendary horseman from days of yore, Nestor (Deasy) was a sort of Polonious-type, better known for dispensing outmoded advice than for achievements won in the execution thereof. Too old to fight at Troy himself, this master of war never failed to urge young men to do so. In seeking Odysseus, Telemachus (Stephen) first visited Nestor, where he heard a wealth of opinion and learned little information of use. bbogle 2015-03-26 13:22 view
29 illdyed Illdyed ≈ Iliad? bbogle 2015-03-26 13:07 view
29 illdyed Illdyed ≈ Iliad? bbogle 2015-03-26 13:07 view
27 Sargent Gifford finds no source for the name Sargent. Perhaps it continues the military theme (i.e., "sergeant") begun in the history of Pyrrhus and echoing on in the battle-cries erupting from the hockey field as this episode plays out. bbogle 2015-03-26 12:11 view
27 Sargent Gifford finds no source for the name Sargent. Perhaps it continues the military theme (i.e., "sergeant") begun in the history of Pyrrhus and echoing on in the battle-cries erupting from the hockey field as this episode plays out. bbogle 2015-03-26 12:11 view
24 Vico Road Actual road, but also an allusion to Giambattista Vico who elaborated a cyclical view of history. See all of Finnegans Wake for more information. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:55 view
24 Vico Road Actual road, but also an allusion to Giambattista Vico who elaborated a cyclical view of history. See all of Finnegans Wake for more information. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:55 view
24 gorescarred That is, gorescarred precisely because it is a book of history, a parade of wars and crimes. At least, the word gorescarred signals to us Stephen's perspective. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:40 view
24 gorescarred That is, gorescarred precisely because it is a book of history, a parade of wars and crimes. At least, the word gorescarred signals to us Stephen's perspective. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:40 view
24 — You, Cochrane, what city sent for him? It seems history, we've already seen, is to blame; here, Stephen is obliged to teach history, toward which he holds a certain aversion, as will soon be established. A widespread re-evaluation of history and its significance concerned many modernist artists, including James Joyce. History therefore becomes an important motif in Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:37 view
24 — You, Cochrane, what city sent for him? It seems history, we've already seen, is to blame; here, Stephen is obliged to teach history, toward which he holds a certain aversion, as will soon be established. A widespread re-evaluation of history and its significance concerned many modernist artists, including James Joyce. History therefore becomes an important motif in Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-26 11:37 view
18 Japhet in search of a father! Japhet: son of Noah and progenitor of European nations. But also Telemachus (Stephen) in search of Odysseus (Bloom). Why should Mulligan compare Stephen to Japhet? Perhaps because Stephen had once declared his intention "to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." bbogle 2015-03-26 08:21 view
18 Japhet in search of a father! Japhet: son of Noah and progenitor of European nations. But also Telemachus (Stephen) in search of Odysseus (Bloom). Why should Mulligan compare Stephen to Japhet? Perhaps because Stephen had once declared his intention "to forge in the smithy of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race." bbogle 2015-03-26 08:21 view
18 a sail tacking by the Muglins I can't help thinking this is also a reference to the perils of being caught between the Scylla and Charybdis; rather, the risk of tacking too close to Mulligan. bbogle 2015-03-26 08:16 view
18 a sail tacking by the Muglins I can't help thinking this is also a reference to the perils of being caught between the Scylla and Charybdis; rather, the risk of tacking too close to Mulligan. bbogle 2015-03-26 08:16 view
18 The Father and the Son idea. The Son striving to be atoned with the Father. Also an allusion to the Odyssean thrust of this episode: that the son Telemachus (Stephen) seeks atonement with Odysseus (Bloom). bbogle 2015-03-26 08:09 view
18 The Father and the Son idea. The Son striving to be atoned with the Father. Also an allusion to the Odyssean thrust of this episode: that the son Telemachus (Stephen) seeks atonement with Odysseus (Bloom). bbogle 2015-03-26 08:09 view
14 maybe a messenger E.g., as Athena was wont to come in disguise to goad mortals into action, as she encouraged Telemachus to depart his home in Ithaca in search of his long-lost father, Odysseus. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:56 view
14 maybe a messenger E.g., as Athena was wont to come in disguise to goad mortals into action, as she encouraged Telemachus to depart his home in Ithaca in search of his long-lost father, Odysseus. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:56 view
23 I will not sleep here tonight. Like Telemachus, Stephen (alternatively Hamlet/Shakespeare/Telemachus) has been thrust from his home and into his quest, thus initiating the dynamic action of the drama; unlike Telemachus, Stephen is not consciously aware that the object of his quest is a father-figure. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:47 view
23 I will not sleep here tonight. Like Telemachus, Stephen (alternatively Hamlet/Shakespeare/Telemachus) has been thrust from his home and into his quest, thus initiating the dynamic action of the drama; unlike Telemachus, Stephen is not consciously aware that the object of his quest is a father-figure. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:47 view
7 Cough it up. In keeping with the motif of phlegm and expectoration persistent in this episode. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:28 view
7 Cough it up. In keeping with the motif of phlegm and expectoration persistent in this episode. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:28 view
5 The bard Referring to Stephen's literary interest and talents, but also linking Stephen to Shakespeare. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:23 view
5 The bard Referring to Stephen's literary interest and talents, but also linking Stephen to Shakespeare. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:23 view
3 the tower As in Hamlet, the action commences as characters move among castle turrets, or their counterpart. Soon, as we shall see, thoughts of a ghost will preoccupy Stephen Dedalus, our broody prince. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:20 view
3 the tower As in Hamlet, the action commences as characters move among castle turrets, or their counterpart. Soon, as we shall see, thoughts of a ghost will preoccupy Stephen Dedalus, our broody prince. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:20 view
3 untonsured That is, Buck Mulligan is not very monk-like. In "The Dead," the Protestant Mr Browne is bewildered by the expressions of piety engaged in by the monks at the Mount Melleray monastery. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:09 view
3 untonsured That is, Buck Mulligan is not very monk-like. In "The Dead," the Protestant Mr Browne is bewildered by the expressions of piety engaged in by the monks at the Mount Melleray monastery. bbogle 2015-03-26 07:09 view
28 subjective and objective genitive. The ambiguous grammar can mean either a mother's love for a child, or a child's love for the mother Tim Finnegan 2015-03-26 04:38 view
34 A shout in the street Rather than an almighty judge, Stephen suggests 'God' might be just one more random set of opinions Tim Finnegan 2015-03-26 04:33 view
67 Gretta Conroy Character in Joyce's story "The Dead." bbogle 2015-03-24 17:08 view
67 Gretta Conroy Character in Joyce's story "The Dead." bbogle 2015-03-24 17:08 view
53 : Note how marked colonicity informs this episode. bbogle 2015-03-24 16:10 view
53 : Note how marked colonicity informs this episode. bbogle 2015-03-24 16:10 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly The same cloud observed by Bloom in Calypso (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/58)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:55 view
9 A cloud began to cover the sun slowly The same cloud observed by Bloom in Calypso (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/58)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:55 view
58 A cloud began to cover the sun wholly slowly wholly. The same cloud observed by Stephen in Telemachus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/9)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:54 view
58 A cloud began to cover the sun wholly slowly wholly. The same cloud observed by Stephen in Telemachus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/9)., synchronizing the Telemachiad with the Wanderings of Ulysses. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:54 view
56 Mine. Slieve Bloom. "My" geography, "Slieve Bloom" being an Irish mountain range. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:17 view
56 Mine. Slieve Bloom. "My" geography, "Slieve Bloom" being an Irish mountain range. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:17 view
56 joggerfry. I.e., geography. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:13 view
56 joggerfry. I.e., geography. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:13 view
56 Ahbeesee defeegee kelomen opeecue rustyouvee double you. I.e., Abc dfg klomn opq rstouv w. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:12 view
56 Ahbeesee defeegee kelomen opeecue rustyouvee double you. I.e., Abc dfg klomn opq rstouv w. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:12 view
55 But I couldn’t go in that light suit. Parallelism with Stephen, who can't wear gray. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:07 view
55 But I couldn’t go in that light suit. Parallelism with Stephen, who can't wear gray. bbogle 2015-03-24 15:07 view
53 with relish With zest, or the condiment? bbogle 2015-03-24 14:30 view
53 with relish With zest, or the condiment? bbogle 2015-03-24 14:30 view
6 Lead him not into temptation. A reference to the Pater Noster, the original line reading 'lead us not into temptation'. Here it has potentially licentious connotations referring to how the aunt (apparently) seeks to keep Buck away from attractive women, and therefore continues his mocking of religious ritual. indigoecho 2015-03-24 07:30 view
50 Moving through the air high spars of a threemaster, her sails brailed up on the crosstrees, homing, upstream, silently moving, a silent ship. Joyce revisits the crosstrees in Stephen's internal mocking of the Apostles' Creed in Scylla and Charybdis (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/189), and this silent ship, the threemaster Rosevean from Bridgwater with bricks, is mentioned at various times as well, including in Eumaeus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/580). bbogle 2015-03-23 19:09 view
50 Moving through the air high spars of a threemaster, her sails brailed up on the crosstrees, homing, upstream, silently moving, a silent ship. Joyce revisits the crosstrees in Stephen's internal mocking of the Apostles' Creed in Scylla and Charybdis (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/189), and this silent ship, the threemaster Rosevean from Bridgwater with bricks, is mentioned at various times as well, including in Eumaeus (http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/580). bbogle 2015-03-23 19:09 view
48 O, touch me soon, now. See also Hades, when Bloom recalls probable occasion of conception of Rudy. http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/86 bbogle 2015-03-23 18:43 view
48 O, touch me soon, now. See also Hades, when Bloom recalls probable occasion of conception of Rudy. http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/86 bbogle 2015-03-23 18:43 view
48 That's twice I forgot to take slips from the library counter. As Leopold Bloom forgets his key. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:33 view
48 That's twice I forgot to take slips from the library counter. As Leopold Bloom forgets his key. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:33 view
46 vulturing Or a vulture. In any event, quite mutable, this dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:26 view
46 vulturing Or a vulture. In any event, quite mutable, this dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:26 view
46 panther Very much like a panther. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:25 view
46 panther Very much like a panther. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:25 view
46 calf Somewhat bovine as well. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 calf Somewhat bovine as well. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 wolf Or mayhap a wolf... bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 wolf Or mayhap a wolf... bbogle 2015-03-23 18:19 view
46 bearish No,'tis like unto a bear. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:18 view
46 bearish No,'tis like unto a bear. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:18 view
46 a buck Or no; how like unto a buck. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:17 view
46 a buck Or no; how like unto a buck. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:17 view
46 like a bounding hare How like a hare this dog has become. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:16 view
46 like a bounding hare How like a hare this dog has become. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:16 view
45 dog Enter the protean dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:11 view
45 dog Enter the protean dog. bbogle 2015-03-23 18:11 view
38 hushed in ruddy wool Molly knit a woolen jacket or sweater in which Rudy was buried. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:27 view
38 hushed in ruddy wool Molly knit a woolen jacket or sweater in which Rudy was buried. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:27 view
37 nacheinander Nacheinander is associated with the sequentiality of time, while nebeneiander is associated with parallel paths through space; furthermore, Stephen associates time with hearing, because we hear one sound after another, and space with seeing, because we see in many directions at once. Working out these associations is one of the keys to unlocking Proteus. See also A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, p 212. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:13 view
37 nacheinander Nacheinander is associated with the sequentiality of time, while nebeneiander is associated with parallel paths through space; furthermore, Stephen associates time with hearing, because we hear one sound after another, and space with seeing, because we see in many directions at once. Working out these associations is one of the keys to unlocking Proteus. See also A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, p 212. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:13 view
37 If I fell over a cliff that beetles o'er his base Shakespeare, with allusion to both Hamlet and King Lear. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:06 view
37 If I fell over a cliff that beetles o'er his base Shakespeare, with allusion to both Hamlet and King Lear. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:06 view
29 It is very simple Stephen struggled with sums when he was Sargent's age, as shown in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:00 view
29 It is very simple Stephen struggled with sums when he was Sargent's age, as shown in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. bbogle 2015-03-23 17:00 view
3 Chrysostomos chrys[o] = (Greek) gold, golden, golden yellow; + -ostome = (Greek) mouth, orifice; therefore, goldenmouth. Suggests Buck's lofty rhetoric is ornamentation lavished to conceal a plainer soul. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:49 view
3 Chrysostomos chrys[o] = (Greek) gold, golden, golden yellow; + -ostome = (Greek) mouth, orifice; therefore, goldenmouth. Suggests Buck's lofty rhetoric is ornamentation lavished to conceal a plainer soul. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:49 view
27 riddle The mystification of the pupils at Stephen's riddle reminds one of the riddle that Athy did not quite share with young Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, thereby bewildering that other once-upon-a-time young pupil. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:01 view
27 riddle The mystification of the pupils at Stephen's riddle reminds one of the riddle that Athy did not quite share with young Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, thereby bewildering that other once-upon-a-time young pupil. bbogle 2015-03-23 16:01 view
542 Time’s livid final flame leaps and, in the following darkness, ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
542 Time’s livid final flame leaps and, in the following darkness, ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry. Compare this Blakean passage to Nestor, http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/24 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
24 I hear the ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry, and time one livid final flame. A Blakean vision destined to recur in Stephen's day, here in apocalyptic combination with the fall of Troy and of local autonomy to the encroaching Roman Empire (e.g., Pyrrhus). See also passage in Proteus http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/43 and, most dramatically, in Circe http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/542 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
24 I hear the ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry, and time one livid final flame. A Blakean vision destined to recur in Stephen's day, here in apocalyptic combination with the fall of Troy and of local autonomy to the encroaching Roman Empire (e.g., Pyrrhus). See also passage in Proteus http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/43 and, most dramatically, in Circe http://www.infiniteulysses.com/ulysses/542 bbogle 2015-03-23 15:36 view
31 put on his topboots to ride to Dublin This is one of the best in-jokes in the book. The actual MP, Sir John Blackwood reportedly *died* in the act of putting on his boots to go to vote *against* the act of Union. (see Jeri Johnson, p. 779) Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 08:03 view
6 g. p. i. "General paralysis of the insane" was a form of madness specifically related to syphilis at that time. This discussion (whether Joyce/Stephen had syphilis) is continuing even today: http://goo.gl/1SWMAO Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:44 view
20 It is mine, I paid the rent. One of the tricky points. The common interpretation is Stephen paid the rent to the tower, and Mulligan is "usurping" the tower from him by taking the key. In real life, it was Gogarty who paid the rent; perhaps Joyce was taking some kind of revenge by reversing the situation. An alternative explanation is that it is Mulligan who paid the rent, and what we read here is Mulligan's voice ringing in Stephen's mind. This would square better with the real-life situation, and the later revelation of Stephen's debt of nine pounds (more than twice his salary) to Mulligan. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:30 view
31 guinea A guinea was an old gold coin, worth slightly more than one pound sterling (21 shillings - 1.05 pound). The coin itself was not in circulation at that time but it was still used as a unit in betting on horses and in "aristocratic" contracts. Joyce himself made a point of borrowing in gentlemanly guineas, and so does Stephen. The subtlety of a contract in guineas being more upper class is also present in "A Mother" in Dubliners. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-22 07:23 view
11 Janey Mack Mulligan is repeatedly taking pains not to"swear" (by mentioning the name of Jesus) in the presence of Haines. It is more a question of polite manners than avoiding blasphemy, since he is extremely blasphemous throughout the book. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:11 view
10 dancecards A dancecard was a card used in a ball with a list of dance partners. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:09 view
9 holding down the long dark chords Was he playing the guitar or the piano? Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:08 view
7 jalap to Zulus Mulligan is alliterating again. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:07 view
7 To ourselves "To ourselves" is the English translation of the slogan "Sinn Fein". Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 14:06 view
4 jejune jesuit Mulligan is alliterating as well. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:44 view
4 Malachi Mulligan Gogarty commented that Joyce made him into a "stage Irish" as Malachi Mulligan. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:40 view
14 Is there Gaelic on you One of the examples of Gaelic grammar seeping into English. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:28 view
13 collector I interpret the sense of "collector" as the "tax collector" here - the Jewish god demands payment of prepuces. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:27 view
11 Cockney accent In "Circe", the King himself (Edward VII) sings this song, presumably without the Cockney accent. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:26 view
20 brazen Of bronze and insolent. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:23 view
20 brazen Of bronze and insolent. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:23 view
3 Thanks, old chap, he cried briskly. That will do nicely. Switch off the current, will you? Jorn Barger's interpretation: Mulligan is thanking God ("old chap") for the miracle of the shrill whistles answering from nowhere just in time for his Mass parody. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:22 view
3 Chrysostomos. Here's a picture of Chrysostomos (from Hagia Sophia in Istanbul): http://goo.gl/V30Bw5 Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:20 view
20 It seems history is to blame. Haines' and Stephen's views of history are vastly different. See also the divergent philosophies of history spelled out in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:16 view
20 It seems history is to blame. Haines' and Stephen's views of history are vastly different. See also the divergent philosophies of history spelled out in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 12:16 view
158 the vegetarian I suspect that Bloom's ideas about consequences of vegetarian eating in this paragraph has to do with "Hiltl" in Zürich, "Europe's oldest vegetarian restaurant". Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:10 view
3 fearful "fearful": Gifford reads this as "frightening" (people, including Mulligan, were afraid of the erudition of Jesuits), Thornton as "afraid" (with reference to Romeo and Juliet:``Romeo, come forth, come forth thou fearful man"). `"Afraid" is more in the spirit of other lines of Mulligan. Yet, in the French translation approved by Joyce it is "abominable" and it is unlikely that Joyce would miss something like that in the first page. Perhaps the double meaning was intentional. Armagan Ekici 2015-03-21 12:00 view
34 History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake. Depicted herein is the clash between visions of a theory, or philosophy, of progressive history and a Modernist conception of a more chaotic theory of history. See, for example, the ninth thesis of Walter Benjamin's "Theses on the Philosophy of History," which may be found here: http://pages.ucsd.edu/~rfrank/class_web/ES-200A/Week%202/benjamin_ps.pdf Here, at the critical crystallization of Stephen's thoughts on the matter, it's worth recalling that it was Haines' casual comment that "it seems history is to blame" has triggered most of Stephen's thinking in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 10:47 view
34 History, Stephen said, is a nightmare from which I am trying to awake. Depicted herein is the clash between visions of a theory, or philosophy, of progressive history and a Modernist conception of a more chaotic theory of history. See, for example, the ninth thesis of Walter Benjamin's "Theses on the Philosophy of History," which may be found here: http://pages.ucsd.edu/~rfrank/class_web/ES-200A/Week%202/benjamin_ps.pdf Here, at the critical crystallization of Stephen's thoughts on the matter, it's worth recalling that it was Haines' casual comment that "it seems history is to blame" has triggered most of Stephen's thinking in Nestor. bbogle 2015-03-21 10:47 view
24 Cochrane Based on Ellmann's evidence, the boys are about 14 years old. Tim Finnegan 2015-03-19 04:11 view
79 fifty pounds a year Salary, not body weight Amanda Visconti 2015-03-18 09:57 view
79 fifty pounds a year Salary, not body weight Amanda Visconti 2015-03-18 09:57 view
79 fifty pounds a year Salary, not body weight Amanda Visconti 2015-03-18 09:57 view
85 That’s a fine old custom In his 'Muddest Thick' vignette for Finnegans Wake, Joyce hints that the custom is lifted hats: http://goo.gl/rXpGva Tim Finnegan 2015-03-17 18:53 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... The centering with left-alignment, and lines not followed by periods here are from the first printing of the novel, viewable at http://goo.gl/P0uKtj Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:43 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... The centering with left-alignment, and lines not followed by periods here are from the first printing of the novel, viewable at http://goo.gl/P0uKtj Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:43 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... The centering with left-alignment, and lines not followed by periods here are from the first printing of the novel, viewable at http://goo.gl/P0uKtj Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:43 view
684 ? The original printing of Ulysses on which this digital edition is based uses spaces between the ends of sentences and question marks in this episode. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:41 view
684 ? The original printing of Ulysses on which this digital edition is based uses spaces between the ends of sentences and question marks in this episode. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:41 view
684 ? The original printing of Ulysses on which this digital edition is based uses spaces between the ends of sentences and question marks in this episode. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:41 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... Centered text (e.g. lyrics) throughout the book should be centered but with left-alignment within centering, like this. The Modenist Versions Project doesn't include this typographical choice, so I'll be manually fixing these as I progress through the book (see the news section on the front page to know which chapters have been fixed.) Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:39 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... Centered text (e.g. lyrics) throughout the book should be centered but with left-alignment within centering, like this. The Modenist Versions Project doesn't include this typographical choice, so I'll be manually fixing these as I progress through the book (see the news section on the front page to know which chapters have been fixed.) Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:39 view
72 Love's                                        Old                                        Sweet                                        Song                                        Comes lo-ve’s old... Centered text (e.g. lyrics) throughout the book should be centered but with left-alignment within centering, like this. The Modenist Versions Project doesn't include this typographical choice, so I'll be manually fixing these as I progress through the book (see the news section on the front page to know which chapters have been fixed.) Amanda Visconti 2015-03-17 11:39 view
3 Buck Mulligan Buck Mulligan plays off the same rhythm of the name Oliver Gogarty. healeywi 2015-03-12 09:18 view
5 Thalatta! Thalatta! In Xenophon's Anabasis,'Thalatta! Thalatta!' (The sea! The sea!') is the cry of ecstasy uttered by the 10,000 Greeks upon summitting Mount Theches and seeing the Black Sea. The army had just come from Cyrus the Young's failed march on the Persian Empire. bekconn 2015-03-09 19:00 view
3 Two strong shrill whistles answered through the calm. The incoming mailboat hugo truyens 2015-03-09 17:04 view
3 untonsured So this is a nice touch to signal the absence of an absence hugo truyens 2015-03-09 16:54 view
4 two dactyls. A dactyl is a set of three syllables, where the first one is stressed, and the other two unstressed: MAL-a-chi, MULL-i-gan. 'Century', 'customer', 'devastate' etc are all dactyls: it's a way of describing stress and rhythm in poetry, especially classical verse. HCE 2015-03-09 16:54 view
3 Stately Some ingenious critics have shown how the first sentence begins with the state and ends with a cross, highlighting the tension between nationality and religion Stephen has trying to escape since A Portrait... Also, the first and last letters here are inverted in the last word of the book (don't worry, no spoilers!). Also, in the Random House edition of the book, the first letters of each of the three parts of the book were printed in huge font, drawing speculation that they stood for the most important person in the life of the main character in that section ('S' here is for narcissistic Stephen, M (in 'Mr Leopold Bloom ate with relish...') for Bloom's love of Molly, and, P (in 'Preparatory to anything else...') for Molly's pet name for husband, Poldy). HCE 2015-03-09 16:47 view
3 Two strong shrill whistles answered through the calm. Who is whistling back here? HCE 2015-03-09 16:37 view
3 the dark winding stairs Takes place at the Martello tower in Sandycove (outside of Dublin). Joyce briefly lived there with a friend, medical student Oliver St. John Gogarty) after whom Mulligan is modeled. In Dublin's Temple Bar district, there is a pub called the Oliver St. John Gogarty, and a statue of Joyce and Gogarty is outside of it commemorating their relationship. This particular stairway in the tower is an extremely narrow, dark, spiral staircase, that leads to the top of the tower. The view from the top overlooks the coastline and the town of Sandycove with Dublin in the distance. Martello towers were used for spotting incoming attacks; there are about 50 along Ireland's coast, many of which are used as locations in works of fiction. The Sandycove tower is now a museum called the James Joyce Tower. laurapavlo 2015-03-09 12:52 view
15 Bill, sir? she said, halting. Well, it's seven mornings a pint at two pence is seven twos is a shilling and twopence over and these three mornings a quart at fourpence is three quarts is a shilling and one and two is two and two, sir. Despite being characterized by the men that receive her as lowly, pedestrian, or unrefined, she is able to deftly perform complex computations. A statement, perhaps, on the capabilities of subject peoples underestimated by the more refined oppressors? joseph.koivisto 2015-03-08 21:39 view
37 nebeneinander German for "side-by-side" KC 2015-03-08 19:48 view
37 nebeneinander German for "side-by-side" KC 2015-03-08 19:48 view
37 nacheinander. German for "in succession" KC 2015-03-08 19:47 view
37 nacheinander. German for "in succession" KC 2015-03-08 19:47 view
37 Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. Here Stephen is contemplating Aristotle's theory of light and colour, which is found in two of Aristotle's works: On the Soul and Sense and Sensibilia. KC 2015-03-08 19:45 view
37 Limit of the diaphane in. Why in? Diaphane, adiaphane. Here Stephen is contemplating Aristotle's theory of light and colour, which is found in two of Aristotle's works: On the Soul and Sense and Sensibilia. KC 2015-03-08 19:45 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:130-131), meaning “master of those that know.” "Vidi il Maestro di color che sanno | Seder tra filosofica famiglia" - "I saw the master of those that know, | seated amid the philosophic family" Dante frequently acknowledges his debt to Aristotle whom he calls Maestro / Master and from whose writings and teachings Dante has based much of his works on. http://goo.gl/tGq4OB It is said that the play on the Italian use of ‘color’ and the English ‘colour’, is a connection that Joyce intended. KC 2015-03-08 11:58 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:130-131), meaning “master of those that know.” "Vidi il Maestro di color che sanno | Seder tra filosofica famiglia" - "I saw the master of those that know, | seated amid the philosophic family" Dante frequently acknowledges his debt to Aristotle whom he calls Maestro / Master and from whose writings and teachings Dante has based much of his works on. http://goo.gl/tGq4OB It is said that the play on the Italian use of ‘color’ and the English ‘colour’, is a connection that Joyce intended. KC 2015-03-08 11:58 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:131), meaning “master of those that know.” KC 2015-03-08 11:38 view
37 maestro di color che sanno From Dante’s Inferno (4:131), meaning “master of those that know.” KC 2015-03-08 11:38 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
37 Ineluctable This entire episode (Episode 3, "Proteus") is the inner monologue of Stephen Dedalus as he walks along a beach. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:44 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
37 Ineluctable Unescapable Amanda Visconti 2015-03-05 09:41 view
3 a razor lay crossed Cross imagery? drlilithsternin 2015-03-05 03:59 view
4 absurd Why absurd? lewpot 2015-03-05 02:35 view
3 Introibo ad altare Dei Translates to : I will go to the altar of G CarTay 2015-03-04 20:22 view
84 Simon Simon Dedalus, who is Stephen Dedalus' father Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 20:15 view
84 Simon Simon Dedalus, who is Stephen Dedalus' father Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 20:15 view
84 Simon Simon Dedalus, who is Stephen Dedalus' father Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 20:15 view
245 Rebound of garter. Simply a cool way of saying re-dressing, or ending a sexual/seductive situation.. perhaps not actually re-dressing but the garter snapping back in place implies an ending of sexual possibility, the garter is back and not to be seen/removed ariadne89 2015-03-04 19:49 view
245 A jumping rose on satiny breasts of satin, A very sort of classic, traditional, stereotypical way of describing the female body/female love interest.. think love sonnets etc. This is interesting. Really clashes with the other language here about the sirens? Horrid, picking nails etc (not exactly soft and beautiful) What is the meaning of this contrast? Surely it is intentional... ariadne89 2015-03-04 19:48 view
177 whether Hamlet is Shakespeare Theories that Shakespeare was really some other known writer have been drifting around since the 1800s. Here he's jokingly extending those theories to apply to Hamlet as well. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 14:19 view
177 whether Hamlet is Shakespeare Theories that Shakespeare was really some other known writer have been drifting around since the 1800s. Here he's jokingly extending those theories to apply to Hamlet as well. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 14:19 view
177 whether Hamlet is Shakespeare Theories that Shakespeare was really some other known writer have been drifting around since the 1800s. Here he's jokingly extending those theories to apply to Hamlet as well. Amanda Visconti 2015-03-04 14:19 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
4 a black panther I don't think that the two exactly map; Bloom is alluded to with a variety of metaphors that suggest what a dark horse is (unexpected winner, no one bets on him) as well as an outsider or shadow (metaphors for darkness, dwelling on the outskirts of things). Amanda Visconti 2015-03-02 14:12 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
19 ballad of Joking Jesu These lyrics are directly taken from a longer poem by Oliver St-John Gogarty, the real-life basis for Mulligan. You can read the whole poem at http://goo.gl/Leylio Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:27 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
18 Elsinore. That beetles o'er his base into the sea Description of the main setting of Shakespeare's play Hamlet, the castle Elsinore. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 12:09 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
17 omphalos "Navel" in Greek. In Greek myth, the omphalos was the center of the world as determined by Zeus sending two birds to fly in separate directions until they met again. The word can also mean a place that feels like the center of the universe because of its power. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 10:05 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 play them as I do Mulligan is comfortable with playing to those with power; Stephen isn't. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:40 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
16 blow him out Mulligan says he's been singing Stephen's praises to Haines. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-23 09:22 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 Yet here's a spot A reference to a scene in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, where Lady Macbeth has gone mad from guilt and obsessively washes her hands. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:34 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
16 gulfstream an ocean current (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_Stream) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 15:18 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
15 visit your national library See the Scylla and Charybdis episode Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 13:29 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
13 He watched her pour The following passage are Stephen's thoughts as he watches the milkwoman—note how his mind turns to historical and literary references Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:48 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 Sandycove A seaside area of Dublin Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:32 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
12 valise suitcase Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:30 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
11 tall figure Haines, the lodger who Stephen and Mulligan discussed earlier Amanda Visconti 2015-02-22 12:25 view
49 diebus ac noctibus iniurias patiens ingemiscit Latin for "All creation (sc. omnis creatura) groans enduring hardships days and nights". From St. Ambrose's commentary on St. Paul's Letter to the Romans, on verse 8:22 ("scimus enim quod omnis creatura ingemescit et parturit usque adhuc"). diyclassics 2015-02-17 18:40 view
49 diebus ac noctibus iniurias patiens ingemiscit Latin for "All creation (sc. omnis creatura) groans enduring hardships days and nights". From St. Ambrose's commentary on St. Paul's Letter to the Romans, on verse 8:22 ("scimus enim quod omnis creatura ingemescit et parturit usque adhuc"). diyclassics 2015-02-17 18:40 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
11 sovereigns a unit of money Amanda Visconti 2015-02-16 19:58 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 secondleg As they're on their second owner's legs, not hands Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:58 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
6 breeks breeches (pants) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-15 10:57 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
37 maestro di color che sanno Could someone translate this and tag it with the name of the language (Italian?) Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 13:18 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
4 his watcher Stephen Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:38 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 looked coldly Stephen and Mulligan are friends, yet there's a tension between them. Stephen is an aspiring writer, while Mulligan is a medical student who also writes (mostly humorous works, it seems; he's modeled on Joyce's acquaintance Oliver St. John Gogarty, an actual Irish poet). There's tension between the two over their acceptance into Dublin's literary circle, in part because Stephen sees Mulligan as betraying Ireland by playing to what the English want. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:37 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Dedalus Stephen's last name is similar to Daedalus, the architect of the minotaur's labyrinth in Greek myth. Ovid tells a story in which Daedalus is imprisoned by the king to prevent him from sharing the secrets of his labyrinth with anyone else. To escape, Daedalus fashions wings out of feathers and wax for himself and his son Icarus. During their escape flight Icarus becomes too excited about flying and soars high nearer the sun, which melts the wax in his wings and causes him to fall to his death. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:33 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 Stephen Dedalus Stephen Dedalus was the central character in an earlier book by James Joyce (his first novel, actually!), A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. In Portrait, Stephen follows a close parallel to Joyce's own youth. In Ulysses, Stephen still represents Joyce's youth, but it feels like Joyce has matured and distanced himself from Stephen since the previous novel and is now able treat the character more critically. Amanda Visconti 2015-02-14 11:29 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak The oak is also a symbol of England. ghostprof 2015-02-05 19:05 view
3 grained and hued like pale oak The oak is also a symbol of England. ghostprof 2015-02-05 19:05 view
3 bearing a bowl it may also indicate the holy grail, the chalice in which Jesus' blood was supposedly caught by Joseph of Arimethea so that the prophecy could be fulfilled, "Not a drop of his blood shall touch the ground." This would set Buck up as aligned with the feminine, and invoke Stephen/Jesus against the mother figure that will haunt in coming passages. ghostprof 2015-02-05 18:58 view
3 bearing a bowl